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The data I'm reading from a serialport (in Qt, using QtSerialPort/QSerialPort) is separated by the newline '\n' and return '\r' characters, which is the way I intend to look at it for parsing. The line length may very, but it is very easy to extract the data from the format of each line.

//signal/slot connection on readyRead() is as follows:
connect(serial, SIGNAL(readyRead()), this, SLOT(readData()));

where readData() is defined as:

void MainWindow::readData()
{
   //As mentioned below, which I will reiterate, I have already tried the addition of 
   // canReadLine():
   if (serial->canReadLine()){
     QByteArray data = serial->readLine();
     //QByteArray allData = serial->readAll();
     parseSerialBytes(data);
     //console->putData(data);
     //console->putData(alldata);
   }
}

However, the QIODevice::readLine() function is extremely slow, and clearly blocking data from being received at full frequency compared to QIODevice::readAll()

Can someone please explain how to properly use the readLine() function so I don't have to loop through readAll() into the QByteArray to parse each line? I used the "terminal" Qt Widgets example to create this asynchronous serialport read functionality.

Thanks in advance - this seems to be a common problem I have not yet seen answered here.

share|improve this question
    
as a comment, I'd like to add that I did enclose my serial->readLine() statement with if (serial->canReadLine()) with no obvious change in data reading frequency. I also noticed that this is almost identical to a question asked by a VB in Visual Studio user like this one, among others in other IDEs and languages who asked this question with no resolve. Very odd. –  Rachael Jul 15 '14 at 22:22
    
Also note that a lot of Qt example code does not demonstrate how to structure and design a large application, just as most of my examples don't do that (nobody would have time to read it). Qt examples are usually a means to an end of demonstrating a limited set of features. Admittedly, many of them are rather crusty and not very good anymore. –  Kuba Ober Jul 16 '14 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a common error. The readData is called only once per a chunk of data, not necessarily once per line.

You need to keep reading lines as long as data is available. It is also a bad design to have serial line reading in a widget class. Move it to a separate object.

class Receiver : public QObject {
  Q_OBJECT
  QSerialPort m_port;
  QByteArray m_buffer;
  void processLine(const QByteArray & line) {
    ...
  }
  Q_SLOT void readData() {
    // IMPORTANT: That's a *while*, not an *if*!
    while (m_port.canReadLine()) processLine(m_port.readLine());
  }
public:
  Receiver(QObject * receiver = 0) : QObject(parent) {
    connect(&m_port, &QIODevice::readyRead, this, &Receiver::readData);
    ...
  }
}

Your error was to implement readData as shown below. Such code reads only one line no matter how many lines are available to be read. It'll appear "slow" since on each invocation there's more and more accumulated data that's left behind unread. Eventually it'll run out of heap.

void readData() {
  // WRONG!
  if (m_port.canReadLine()) processLine(m_port.readLine());
}
share|improve this answer
    
AH! Thank you!! I cannot believe I didn't catch that I used "if." Thanks for all the code written otherwise. I couldn't figure out what your comment above (while != if) was referring to. Now I'm mad at myself, but regardless, this seems to be a common usage error I'm seeing, so, my error may now help people. Really great help, thank you. –  Rachael Jul 17 '14 at 21:01

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