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I have a array containing japanese caracters as well as "normal". How do I align the printout of these?

#!/usr/bin/python
# coding=utf-8

a1=['する', 'します', 'trazan', 'した', 'しました']
a2=['dipsy', 'laa-laa', 'banarne', 'po', 'tinky winky']

for i,j in zip(a1,a2):
    print i.ljust(12),':',j

print '-'*8

for i,j in zip(a1,a2):
    print i,len(i)
    print j,len(j)

Output:

する       : dipsy
します    : laa-laa
trazan       : banarne
した       : po
しました : tinky winky
--------
する 6
dipsy 5
します 9
laa-laa 7
trazan 6
banarne 7
した 6
po 2
しました 12
tinky winky 11

thanks, //Fredrik

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I think to people in Japan, you have a mix of "normal" and Romanji. And to people in Thailand.... –  MtnViewMark Mar 19 '10 at 15:19
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using the unicodedata.east_asian_width function, keep track of which characters are narrow and wide when computing the length of the string.

#!/usr/bin/python
# coding=utf-8

import sys
import codecs
import unicodedata

out = codecs.getwriter('utf-8')(sys.stdout)

def width(string):
    return sum(1+(unicodedata.east_asian_width(c) in "WF")
        for c in string)

a1=[u'する', u'します', u'trazan', u'した', u'しました']
a2=[u'dipsy', u'laa-laa', u'banarne', u'po', u'tinky winky']

for i,j in zip(a1,a2):
    out.write('%s %s: %s\n' % (i, ' '*(12-width(i)), j))

Outputs:

する          : dipsy
します        : laa-laa
trazan        : banarne
した          : po
しました      : tinky winky

It doesn’t look right in some web browser fonts, but in a terminal window they line up properly.

share|improve this answer
    
tab is not a solution, what I'm really are doing is generating sphinx-tables containing japanese verb conjugations. I'll check the east_asian_width function... –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '10 at 12:24
    
perfect, just what I was looking for in theory at least. Trying to run it though gives me this: $ ./try.py Traceback (most recent call last): File "./try.py", line 12, in <module> print i,' '*(12-width(i)),':',j UnicodeEncodeError: 'latin-1' codec can't encode characters in position 0-1: ordinal not in range(256) –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '10 at 12:34
    
@Fredrick Ouch, you might need to look at sys.setdefaultencoding. blog.ianbicking.org/illusive-setdefaultencoding.html –  Josh Lee Mar 19 '10 at 12:37
    
extremely annoying, cant get it to work... >>> import sys >>> sys.getdefaultencoding() 'utf-8' can you pls post the complete code? –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '10 at 13:15
    
Ok, I think the correct solution is to not use the default encoding, but to explicitly encode every unicode string into the codec you want. See this question (stackoverflow.com/questions/492483/…). OS X appears to have customized this problem away... –  Josh Lee Mar 19 '10 at 13:55
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Use unicode objects instead of byte strings:

#!/usr/bin/python
# coding=utf-8

a1=[u'する', u'します', u'trazan', u'した', u'しました']
a2=[u'dipsy', u'laa-laa', u'banarne', u'po', u'tinky winky']

for i,j in zip(a1,a2):
    print i.ljust(12),':',j

print '-'*8

for i,j in zip(a1,a2):
    print i,len(i)
    print j,len(j)

Unicode objects deal with characters directly.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn’t solve the problem. –  Josh Lee Mar 19 '10 at 12:16
    
using u'string' I get UnicodeEncodeError: 'latin-1' codec can't encode characters in position 0-1: ordinal not in range(256) solved by doing a print j.encoding('utf-8') but that seems extremely awkward... –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '10 at 12:21
    
@jleedev—My console says otherwise. Can you be more specific? What results are you getting? @Fredrik—Sounds like your terminal wants to use Latin-1 encoding. You'll have to find a way to convince it to use UTF-8, or write your output to a file instead of printing (I recommend import codecs; f = codecs.open('output.txt', encoding='utf-8')). Good luck! –  jcdyer Mar 19 '10 at 15:08
    
@jleedev—Ah. I see what's going on. It depends on your font, to some extent, and there's nothing python can do about that, but it does fix the issue with the character counts in the second for loop. –  jcdyer Mar 19 '10 at 15:12
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