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I need to declare a global variable (it is that variable that you declare on top of a certain class right?) but the problem is, C# prohibits me to declare it as "var" type. so I've got a trouble making it dynamically accept different kinds and types of constructors. I'm using C# & WPF.

var itemObject; //error, I can't declare it as var

    public void LoadGridview(string Moder)
    {
        if (Moder == "Persons")
        {
            itemObject = PersonsMgr();
        }`enter code here`
        else if (Moder == "Car")
        {
            itemObject = CarsMgr();
        }

    }
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Is there anything in commong among the classes that you want to assign to itemObject properties methods etc? –  Mike Hixson Jul 16 '14 at 2:31
    
Well, you could do object itemObject;. But I have a sneaking suspicion that you're trying to do something that has a better solution. What is the larger problem you're trying to solve? –  Jim Mischel Jul 16 '14 at 2:33
    
they have common methods but different signatures, Is that still doable? ex public class PersonMgr : ISelectable<Person, PersonParams>, IManipulatable<Person> public class CarMgr : ISelectable<Car, CarParams>, IManipulatable<Car> //sample method public Car Retrieve(CarParams parameters) { return _db.Retrieve(parameters); } public Person Retrieve(PersonParams parameters) { return _db.Retrieve(parameters); } –  Kokombads Jul 16 '14 at 2:44
    
@JimMischel, Im trying to have a single variable that will accept those Mgr classes and put it in the wpf datagrid. If the Moder is "Persons", then it will retrieve all records of the Persons table in my database, if it is Cars, then Cars records in Cars table will be loaded in wpf Datagrid, saves me multiple forms if I solve this –  Kokombads Jul 16 '14 at 2:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

S McCrohan is correct, if you have something common in both classes then you should have created a base class or interface containing those common members. But due to any reason if you haven't implemented any base class or interface then there is another solution if you are using .Net Framework 4.0 or greater:

dynamic itemObject; //Now you can declare the variable which will accept any constructor
public void LoadGridview(string Moder)
{
    if (Moder == "Persons")
    {
        itemObject = PersonsMgr();
    }
    else if (Moder == "Car")
    {
        itemObject = CarsMgr();
    }
}

The only problem with this approach is that intellisence won't display the list of properties or methods after placing a dot after object name. You will have to explicitly write the name of any property or method you want to use. It won't give any compile time error but if that property or method won't be resolved at runtime it will throw an error.

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I would look into C# generics. It's a way to use make your objects flexible when it comes to types.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/512aeb7t.aspx

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Trying to do this only makes sense if the PersonsMgr and CarsMgr classes have some members or methods in common, which you're expecting to access later. Create a parent class for them both to extend, or an interface for them both to implement, and declare itemObject using that.

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yup, they have common fields like Id, CreatedBy, CreatedOn, ModifiedBy, ModifiedOn regarding the Interface, this is the problem, ISelectable<Car, CarParams>, IManipulatable<Car> each of those Mgr has two separate Interfaces with ankle brakets here is the whole interface classes namespace NeoClinic.Interfaces { public interface ISelectable<T, TParams> where TParams : Parameters { #region T Retrieve(TParams parameters); List<T> RetrieveMany(TParams parameters); #endregion } } –  Kokombads Jul 16 '14 at 2:38

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