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I'm doing a message inspector in WCF:

public class LogMessageInspector :
    IDispatchMessageInspector, IClientMessageInspector

which implements the method:

public object AfterReceiveRequest(ref Message request,
    IClientChannel channel, InstanceContext instanceContext)

I can get the name of the invoked service with:

instanceContext.GetServiceInstance().GetType().Name

But how do I get the name of the invoked operation?

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It's not pretty, but this is what I did to get the operation name:

var action = OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageHeaders.Action;
var operationName = action.Substring(action.LastIndexOf("/", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) + 1);
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Thank you for your answer. It works like a charm. – user297332 Mar 22 '10 at 10:42
var operationName = OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageProperties["HttpOperationName"] as string;
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This approach is similar to others presented here, but uses Path.GetFileName:

Path.GetFileName(OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageHeaders.Action);

The return value of this method and the format of the path string work quite harmoniously in this scenario:

The characters after the last directory character in path. If the last character of path is a directory or volume separator character, this method returns String.Empty. If path is null, this method returns null.

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Came up as an empty string for me, while Michael's answer worked. – jk7 Jan 29 at 1:24
    
@jk7: That is due to the fact that you are making RESTful requests (using WebHttpBinding of WCF). The solution above will work for SOAP requests (any standard bindings besides WebHttpBinding) while @Michael's solution will work for RESTful requests. – Derek W Jan 29 at 13:22
    
Related question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/852860/… – Derek W Jan 29 at 13:27
    
Good to know, thanks Derek. – jk7 Jan 29 at 18:36
OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageHeaders.Action.Split('/').ToList().Last();
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1  
The ToList() isn't necessary, is it? – Nuzzolilo Jul 12 '14 at 7:25
    
@Nuzzolilo, Not Required. – Prasad Kanaparthi Jul 17 '14 at 10:21

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