Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I changed the info.plist file in Boot Camp package to make it support making USB installing drives on my Mac, but on Mac OS X Mavericks the app crashed before I signed the new file. I use the following code in terminal to sign it.

sudo codesign -fs - /Applications/Utilities/Boot\ Camp\ Assistant.app

After signing the code, the app ran successfully. The whole tutorial is here: Enable Bootcamp to install from usb for OSX 10.9

BUT I am wondering why I can sign the code so easily, without any formal certificate. I think code signature is a security feature. Only developers with certificates can sign their codes and distribute them, and Apple only allow these signed programs to run: About Code Signing I am a beginner on this topic; can someone explain the process a little bit? Does this means that hackers can sign whatever codes they want (maybe malicious ones) and run them AS LONG AS they get the password for root account?


Then I changed back to the original info.plist and wanted to remove the signature for the file that I created. How do I do this?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
If a hacker has root access, they could do much worse. – Alexander O'Mara Jul 16 '14 at 3:25

The reason is because you are signing the package with a local certificate. When Apple sign the package, it will run on any Mac, as their root certificate is trusted in the base OS. If you transferred your locally signed package to another mac, you would find that it crashes, because it was signed with a certificate from another machine.

Hope this clears it up.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.