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I have a generic Collection and am trying to work out how I can sort the items contained within it. Ive tried a few things but I cant get any of them working.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Collections by themselves do not have a predefined order, therefore you must convert them to a java.util.List. Then you can use one form of java.util.Collections.sort

Collection< T > collection = ...;

List< T > list = new ArrayList< T >( collection );

Collections.sort( list );
 // or
Collections.sort( list, new Comparator< T >( ){...} );

// list now is sorted
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Although this solves the problem, this will not be the fastest way to do this, unless the collection itself is already a List. –  Fortega Mar 19 '10 at 13:28
1  
@Fortega: Then enlighten me what IS the fastest way to sort a general Collection while retaining all of its elements. BTW, this is exactly the method used by Google Collections Ordering.sortedCopy. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Mar 19 '10 at 14:27
    
It depends on the type of the collection. For collections of which the toArray() method (called in constructor of ArrayList) needs iteration over all the elements (for example: a Set), sorting might need an extra loop over all elements. You could use google collections TreeMultiset, which allows duplicates. Although the differences will probably be not very big and in the same order of magnitude. –  Fortega Mar 19 '10 at 16:04

A Collection does not have an ordering, so wanting to sort it does not make sense. You can sort List instances and arrays, and the methods to do that are Collections.sort() and Arrays.sort()

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You can't if T is all you get. You have to have the it injected by the provider via:

Collection<T extends Comparable>

or pass in the Comparator via the Collections.sort(...) method

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If your collections object is a list, I would use the sort method, as proposed in the other answers.

However, if it is not a list, and you don't really care about what type of Collection object is returned, I think it is faster to create a TreeSet instead of a List:

TreeSet sortedSet = new TreeSet(myComparator);
sortedSet.addAll(myCollectionToBeSorted);
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TreeSet requires Comparable to be implemented, if you want the set sorted. This is what I usually do when I need a sorted Collection. TreeSet will also throw away duplicates. –  David Mar 19 '10 at 13:37
1  
TreeSet does not require Comparable to be implemented if you use a Comparator. However, you are right about the duplicates. –  Fortega Mar 19 '10 at 13:52
    
OOPS- missed the comparator sitting in there. I always implement Comparable, so I missed it completely. –  David Mar 19 '10 at 13:57
1  
Note that a TreeSet is feasible only when the collection does not contain duplicates. Also, populating an ArrayList and then sorting it is faster than populating a TreeSet. Though both approaches are O(N log N), a TreeSet has a higher constant factor because of the red-black tree manipulations and the larger number of memory allocations. Still, I sometimes use a TreeSet to make my code more concise, even though that's slower than using an ArrayList. –  Jared Levy Apr 4 '10 at 1:23

Here is an example - [i am using CompareToBuilder class from Apache for convenience, although this can be done without using it]

import java.util.ArrayList; import java.util.Calendar; import java.util.Collections; import java.util.Comparator; import java.util.Date; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.List; import org.apache.commons.lang.builder.CompareToBuilder; public class Tester { boolean ascending = true ;

public static void main(String args[]) {
    Tester tester = new Tester() ;
    tester.printValues() ;
}

public void printValues ()
{

    List<HashMap<String,Object>> list = new ArrayList<HashMap<String,Object>>() ;
    HashMap<String,Object> map = new HashMap<String,Object>();

    map.put("actionId", new Integer(1234)) ;
    map.put("eventId", new Integer(21)) ;
    map.put("fromDate", getDate(1) ) ;
    map.put("toDate", getDate(7) ) ;
    list.add(map);

    map = new HashMap<String,Object>();
    map.put("actionId", new Integer(456)) ;
    map.put("eventId", new Integer(11)) ;
    map.put("fromDate", getDate(1)) ;
    map.put("toDate", getDate(1) ) ;
    list.add(map);


    map = new HashMap<String,Object>();
    map.put("actionId", new Integer(1234)) ;
    map.put("eventId", new Integer(20)) ;
    map.put("fromDate", getDate(4) ) ;
    map.put("toDate", getDate(16) ) ;
    list.add(map);

    map = new HashMap<String,Object>();
    map.put("actionId", new Integer(1234)) ;
    map.put("eventId", new Integer(22)) ;
    map.put("fromDate",getDate(8) ) ;
    map.put("toDate", getDate(11)) ;
    list.add(map);


    map = new HashMap<String,Object>();
    map.put("actionId", new Integer(1234)) ;
    map.put("eventId", new Integer(11)) ;
    map.put("fromDate",getDate(1) ) ;
    map.put("toDate", getDate(10) ) ;
    list.add(map);

    map = new HashMap<String,Object>();
    map.put("actionId", new Integer(1234)) ;
    map.put("eventId", new Integer(11)) ;
    map.put("fromDate",getDate(4) ) ;
    map.put("toDate", getDate(15) ) ;
    list.add(map);


    map = new HashMap<String,Object>();
    map.put("actionId", new Integer(567)) ;
    map.put("eventId", new Integer(12)) ;
    map.put("fromDate", getDate(-1) ) ;
    map.put("toDate",getDate(1)) ;
    list.add(map);


    System.out.println("\n Before Sorting \n ");
    for(int j = 0 ; j < list.size() ; j ++ ) 
        System.out.println(list.get(j));    

    Collections.sort ( list , new HashMapComparator2 () ) ;

    System.out.println("\n After Sorting \n ");
    for(int j = 0 ; j < list.size() ; j ++ ) 
        System.out.println(list.get(j));

}


public static Date getDate(int days) {

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.setTime(new Date());
    cal.add(Calendar.DATE, days);
    return cal.getTime() ;        

}

public class HashMapComparator2 implements Comparator
{
    public int compare ( Object object1 , Object object2 )
    {
        if ( ascending == true )
        {
            return new CompareToBuilder()
            .append(( ( HashMap ) object1 ).get ( "actionId" ), ( ( HashMap ) object2 ).get ( "actionId" ))
            .append(( ( HashMap ) object2 ).get ( "eventId" ), ( ( HashMap ) object1 ).get ( "eventId" ))
            .toComparison();
        }
        else
        {
            return new CompareToBuilder()
            .append(( ( HashMap ) object2 ).get ( "actionId" ), ( ( HashMap ) object1 ).get ( "actionId" ))
            .append(( ( HashMap ) object2 ).get ( "eventId" ), ( ( HashMap ) object1 ).get ( "eventId" ))
            .toComparison();
        }
    }
}

}

If you have a specific code that you are working on and are having issues, you can post your pseudo code and we can try to help you out!

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Thx for your reply but i have a generic Collection this example not work for me –  Mercer Mar 19 '10 at 12:42

You have two basic options provided by java.util.Collections:

Depending on what the Collection is, you can also look at SortedSet or SortedMap.

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