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I'm using C++ with libcurl to do SFTP/FTPS transfers. Before uploading a file, I need to check if the file exists without actually downloading it.

If the file doesn't exist, I run into the following problems:

//set up curlhandle for the public/private keys and whatever else first.
curl_easy_setopt(CurlHandle, CURLOPT_URL, "sftp://user@pass:host/nonexistent-file");
curl_easy_setopt(CurlHandle, CURLOPT_NOBODY, 1);
curl_easy_setopt(CurlHandle, CURLOPT_FILETIME, 1);
int result = curl_easy_perform(CurlHandle); 
//result is CURLE_OK, not CURLE_REMOTE_FILE_NOT_FOUND
//using curl_easy_getinfo to get the file time will return -1 for filetime, regardless
//if the file is there or not.

If I don't use CURLOPT_NOBODY, it works, I get CURLE_REMOTE_FILE_NOT_FOUND.

However, if the file does exist, it gets downloaded, which wastes time for me, since I just want to know if it's there or not.

Any other techniques/options I'm missing? Note that it should work for ftps as well.


Edit: This error occurs with sftp. With FTPS/FTP I get CURLE_FTP_COULDNT_RETR_FILE, which I can work with.

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Did you ever solve this problem? I'm having the same issue. – Lextar Feb 10 '11 at 19:47

Tested this in libcurl 7.38.0

curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_NOBODY, 1L);
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_HEADER, 1L);

CURLcode iRc = curl_easy_perform(curl);

if (iRc == CURLE_REMOTE_FILE_NOT_FOUND)
  // File doesn't exist
else if (iRc == CURLE_OK)
  // File exists

However, CURLOPT_NOBODY and CURLOPT_HEADER for SFTP doesn't return an error if file doesn't exist in some previous versions of libcurl. An alternative solution to resolve this:

// Ask for the first byte
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_RANGE,
    (const char *)"0-0");

CURLcode iRc = curl_easy_perform(curl);

if (iRc == CURLE_REMOTE_FILE_NOT_FOUND)
  // File doesn't exist
else if (iRc == CURLE_OK || iRc == CURLE_BAD_DOWNLOAD_RESUME)
  // File exists
share|improve this answer
    
Why ask for 10 bytes instead of 1 byte? – Remy Lebeau May 21 '15 at 18:13
    
@RemyLebeau: That is immaterial. The aim is to download only as much to know if the file exists. 1 byte or 10 bytes over a network doesn't practically make any difference. – Mukul Gupta May 21 '15 at 18:16
    
@RemyLebeau: Indeed, the alternative solution in its present form is flawed. If it is a 0-byte remote file, the error returned is CURLE_BAD_DOWNLOAD_RESUME since the offset specified is greater than the expected size. Editing my answer. – Mukul Gupta May 23 '15 at 8:20

Looks like I simply can't make this work with sftp:

http://curl.haxx.se/mail/lib-2009-09/0255.html

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I found a way to make this work. The basic concept is to attempt to read the file, then abort the read operation if the file exists, to avoid downloading the whole file. So it will either get a returned error from cURL for "file doesn't exist", or "error writing data":

static size_t abort_read(void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, void *data)
{
  (void)ptr;
  (void)data;
  /* we are not interested in the data itself,
     so we abort operation ... */ 
  return (size_t)(-1); // produces CURLE_WRITE_ERROR
}
....
curl_easy_setopt(curl,CURLOPT_URL, url);
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_VERBOSE, 1L);
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEDATA, NULL);
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, abort_read);
CURLcode res = curl_easy_perform(curl);
/* restore options */
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, NULL);
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEDATA, NULL);
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_URL, NULL);
return (res==CURLE_WRITE_ERROR);
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