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I stumbled upon this code on internet

public class Test {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int i = (byte) + (char) - (int) + (long) - 1;
        System.out.println(i);

    }

}

It prints 1.

Can i know why ?

Here is the source --> http://www.javacodegeeks.com/2011/10/weird-funny-java.html

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marked as duplicate by David Wallace Jul 16 '14 at 13:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Can i know why the downvote ? –  Abhishek Singh Jul 16 '14 at 13:23
    
Break the line yup and look at the values –  Mark Jul 16 '14 at 13:24
1  
These are all unary operators and casts. –  blgt Jul 16 '14 at 13:24
    
-1 Because it is copy question; link shows it isn't... so LMGTFY –  ST3 Jul 23 '14 at 6:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
int i = (byte) + (char) - (int) + (long) - 1;
            ^-------^--------^-------^ Type casting

+ - + - are assigning the sign (Unary Operators) to the number, so - then + then - and finally + gives you 1.

If we just ignore the type casts we have (+(-(+(-(1)))))=1

Equivalent code:

long a = (long) - 1;
int b = (int) + a;
char c = (char) - b;
int finalAns = (byte) + c;
System.out.println(finalAns); // gives 1
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Because after operator precedence rules are applied it becomes equivalent to:

int i = (byte) ((char) -((int) ((long) -1)));

which evaluates to -(-1) which is 1.

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Due to type casting it's equivalent to

public class Test {

/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    long a1 = -1;
    int a2 = a1; //still -1
    char a3 = -a2; // 1
    byte a4 = a3; // 1
    int i = a4; // 1
    System.out.println(i);

}

}
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