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I want to calculate functions based on rows, not on columns as with mutate(). For example, with

library(dplyr)

set.seed(1)
dfx <- data.frame(
    date = rep(seq(1,5),3),
    type = c(rep('A', 5), rep('B1', 5), rep('B2', 5)),
    value = runif(n = 15, min = 0, max = 20)
    )

which results in the data frame

#    date type     value
# 1     1    A  5.310173
# 2     2    A  7.442478
# 3     3    A 11.457067
# 4     4    A 18.164156
# 5     5    A  4.033639
# 6     1   B1 17.967794
# 7     2   B1 18.893505
# 8     3   B1 13.215956
# 9     4   B1 12.582281
# 10    5   B1  1.235725
# 11    1   B2  4.119491
# 12    2   B2  3.531135
# 13    3   B2 13.740457
# 14    4   B2  7.682074
# 15    5   B2 15.396828

I want to calculate the differences A-B1 and A-B2 of the corresponding values for every date. While

library(reshape2)
dfx %>%
    dcast(date~type) %>%
    group_by(date) %>%
    summarise(a1=A-B1, a2=A-B2)

works, the reshaping seems to be a bit ugly. As far as I understood the concept of tidy data, the data structure should not be adapted to the tools once it is in tidy form but the tools should just work with the tidy data format. But maybe it's just me and the reshaping is fine...

share|improve this question
    
The reshaping step seems totally logical to me.... –  Ananda Mahto Jul 16 at 14:39
1  
Quoting chapter and verse from the Book of Wickham: " A general rule of thumb is that it is easier to describe functional relationships between variables [...] than between rows, and it is easier to make comparisons between groups of observations [...] than between groups of columns." vita.had.co.nz/papers/tidy-data.pdf –  AndrewMacDonald Jul 16 at 16:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the question is how to use the tidyr package here then we can replace dcast with spread like this:

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

dfx %>% 
    spread(type, value) %>% 
    group_by(date) %>% 
    summarise(a1 = A-B1, a2 = A-B2)

giving:

Source: local data frame [5 x 3]

  date         a1         a2
1    1 -12.657620   1.190682
2    2 -11.451027   3.911343
3    3  -1.758889  -2.283390
4    4   5.581875  10.482081
5    5   2.797913 -11.363190

Note

1) It is true, at least in this case, that once we have done dfx %>% spread(type,value) that the rest of the computation does not further involve tidyr.

2) If you want to avoid the long-to-wide transformation entirely it could be done like this:

dfx %>% 
    group_by(date) %>% 
    summarize(a1 = value[type=="A"]-value[type=="B1"], 
              a2 = value[type=="A"]-value[type=="B2"])

or assuming the sort order shown in the question:

dfx %>% 
    group_by(date) %>% 
    summarize(a1 = value[1]-value[2], a2 = value[1]-value[3])

Both these give the same answer as the the one shown in the first solution.

Added Two notes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. Other seem to agree that the reshaping is fine so I'll stick to that. –  sebschub Jul 17 at 7:09

A non-reshaping solution is possible, but that'd have to go through do(.) in dplyr (especially if you've more groups to subtract from group A), as summarise errors if the length of output for any group exceeds 1.

dfx %>% group_by(date) %>% do(data.frame(ans=tail(.$value[1]-.$value, -1L)))
# Source: local data frame [10 x 2]
# Groups: date

#    date        ans
# 1     1 -12.657620
# 2     1   1.190682
# 3     2 -11.451027
# 4     2   3.911343
# 5     3  -1.758889
# 6     3  -2.283390
# 7     4   5.581875
# 8     4  10.482081
# 9     5   2.797913
# 10    5 -11.363190

But probably this is inefficient compared to the reshaping answers (due to data.frame(.) on each group).

PS: Note that in your dcast answer or in the other answers, there's no need to group_by(date) after casting.


To answer @Gabor's comment:

I'd do something like:

dfx %>% spread(type, value) %>% 
        do(data.frame(date=.$date, a1=.$A-.$B1, a2=.$A-.$B2))

Grouping is unnecessary and making use of it for compactness here is not a good compromise (imagine 100,000 groups or more).

Using mutate, we'd want to replace all B* columns with the respective differences, which'd only result in having to remove the A column. I think this is doable using dplyr, but I'm not proficient enough to get there.

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding the PS, if one did not use group_by(date) one would need mutate rather than summarise and so would need to remove the unwanted variables that group_by eliminates so dropping group_by would not result in a more compact solution. –  G. Grothendieck Jul 17 at 11:13

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