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I'm really new to programming, and just started making a rock, paper, scissors game. But I'm hung up on assigning randint to an object, I made a bold comment where I'm having the problem. I'm assuming when I keep calling computer = randint(0,2) it will change computer each time, so how can I fix that? Sorry if this is a silly question.

import random
from random import randint
import time
import sys

def choice():
    print("Rock, paper, scissors, or quit?")
    answer = input('> ').lower()

    if answer in('rock'):
        print("\nYou have chosen {}".format(answer))

    elif answer in('paper'):
        print("\nYou have chosen {}".format(answer))

    elif answer in('scissors'):
        print("\nYou have chosen {}".format(answer))

    elif answer in('quit'):
        sys.exit(0)
    else:
        print("Could not recognize your answer. Please try again.")
        choice()

    print("Rock")
    time.sleep(0.5)
    print("Paper")
    time.sleep(0.5)
    print("Scissors")
    time.sleep(0.5)

    options = ('Rock', 'Paper', 'Scissors')*3
    print("\nI have chosen: " + random.choice(options))
    print('\n')

    new_answer = answer
    #THIS IS WHERE IM HAVING TROUBLE ASSIGNING OBJECT TO THE RANDINT
    computer = randint(0,2)

    if new_answer == 'rock':
        if computer == 0: #paper
            print("1")
        elif computer == 1: #scissors
            print("2")
        elif computer == 2: #
            print("3")
    if new_answer == 'paper':
        if computer == 0: #
            print("Paper covers rock. You win.")
        elif computer == 1:
            print("It's a draw. We suck.")
        elif computer == 2:
            print("Scissors cuts paper. I win")
    if new_answer == 'scissors':
        if computer == 0:
            print("Rock crushes scissors. I win.")
        if computer == 1:
            print("Scissors cut paper. You win.")
        if computer == 2:
            print("It's a draw. We suck.")
share|improve this question
    
What trouble are you having? Throw some prints in there and show us the actual output compared to what you'd expect. Also include any relevant error messages you're recieving –  wnnmaw Jul 16 '14 at 14:48
1  
Also, there is no reason to import random, then from random import randint. You can either do the first and refer to the function as random.randint or the second and refer to it as just randint. But this isn't a huge deal –  wnnmaw Jul 16 '14 at 14:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
print("\nI have chosen: " + random.choice(options))
#...
computer = randint(0,2)

You are making the computer choose twice. You should choose (randomly) once, assign the result to a variable, and then print it.

As soon as you assign the value of the function call to a variable (as in computer = randint(0,2)), the value of the variable (computer) does not change, unless you assign to it again.

A couple more remarks:

  • As wnnmaw mentioned, you don't need to import random
  • You don't need to import exit from sys, it's natively available
  • You can import time.sleep directly
  • You should keep the association between numbers and choices (rock,paper,scissor) only once in your code, to prevent errors, and use apropriate list functions to get them (suc h as list.index
  • You were using in innapropriately in place of the == operator
  • Once you keep the associations in one place, you don't need to test them individually: use in
  • ('Rock', 'Paper', 'Scissors')*3: This creates a tuple with 9 elements, which is probably not what you wanted
  • the new_answer variable seems redundant
  • The function is becoming very long, so you can refactor parts of it to new functions, so it becomes more readable
  • Be carefull calling a function inside the function itself. Generally, you should prefer to use a cycle (lookup "recursion" and "stack overflow")
  • You can use the order of the choices (rock, paper, scissors) to check the outcome of the match elegantly, as each choice wins when up agains the choice immediatelly before it . You can do this using the modulus operator (%)

Here's a rewritten version taking these tips into consideration:

from random import choice
from time import sleep

CHOICES=('rock','paper','scissors')

def print_animation():
    print("Rock")
    sleep(0.5)
    print("Paper")
    sleep(0.5)
    print("Scissors")
    sleep(0.5)


def rock_paper_scissors():
    while(True):
        print("Rock, paper, scissors, or quit?")
        answer = input('> ').lower()
        if answer in CHOICES:
            print("\nYou have chosen {}\n".format(answer))
            break
        elif answer=='quit':
            sys.exit(0)
        else:
            print("Could not recognize your answer. Please try again.")

    print_animation()

    computer= choice(CHOICES)
    print("\nI have chosen: " + computer + "\n")

    player_answer_index= CHOICES.index(answer)
    computer_answer_index= CHOICES.index(computer)

    if player_answer_index==computer_answer_index:
        print("draw")
    elif (player_answer_index+1)%3==computer_answer_index:
        print("computer wins")
    else:
        print("player wins")


rock_paper_scissors()
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I know, a lot of the redundancy and inefficiencies in the code are from previous changes or variations I tried, such as 'in' and new_answer. I appreciate the revision, as it makes things a lot more clear. I'll definitely use the order of choices more, as it makes the most sense. –  MoawingWizard Jul 16 '14 at 15:53

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