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I have an abstract base class that has some virtual methods and a virtual destructor. I want to make the copy constructor and the assignment operator of the base class (and the derived class) as private so I can hide them and the static analysis tool (klockwork) cannot flag it. This is my code snippet:

class Parent: public mainParentClassIDontCareAbout
{
 public:
         Parent (int a);
         virtual ~Parent ();
 protected:
         void doSomething(); 
      .
      .
 private:
          // Hide assignment operator and copy constructor
         Parent (const Parent&) {};
         Parent operator= (const Parent&) {return *this;};

 } // end of parent class definition

class Child : public Parent
{
 public:
         Child (void *x, int y, bool z);
         ~Child ();
 protected:
           .
           .
           .
 private:
          // Hide assignment operator and copy constructor
         Child (const Child&) {};
         Child operator= (const Child&) {return *this;};

 } // end of parent class definition

However, I get a compile time error as:

invalid abstract return type for member function ‘Lib::Parent Lib::Parent::operator=(const Lib::Parent&)’

I want to hide the assignment operator and copy constructor. Is this not a valid behavior when we have a virtual destructor or are there any solutions if I want to have the same scenario ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The assignment operator should return a reference:

Parent & operator= (const Parent&) {return *this;}
       ^

and likewise for Child. Alternatively, they could return nothing, if you don't care about chaining assignments.

Yours tries to return a copy of the object which, in the case of Parent is impossible because Parent is abstract and can't be instantiated.

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Should that be true for the copy constructor as well ? Parent & (cosnt Parent&) {}; ? –  noobcoder Jul 16 '14 at 15:20
    
@noobcoder: No, constructors don't return anything. They're declared as if they have the same name as the class they construct. –  Mike Seymour Jul 16 '14 at 15:21
1  
+1 There is an issue though, the code won't compile as it is (after you add the reference to the return type of operator=), because there is no default ctor for Parent, and the copy ctor of Child will fail (it doesn't know how to instantiate the Parent part of the object). So do something like Parent (int a=0){...}; or call the base ctor in Child as Child (const Child&): Parent(value){...} –  vsoftco Jul 16 '14 at 15:30
    
@Mike: Great that worked for the assignment operator. But I do get the error in the Child class for copy constructor as: error: no matching function for call to ‘Lib::Parent::Parent()’ –  noobcoder Jul 16 '14 at 15:31
1  
@noobcoder, see my comment above –  vsoftco Jul 16 '14 at 15:32

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