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Experiencing some unexpected performance from Microsoft ImmutableList from NuGet package Microsoft.Bcl.Immutable version 1.0.34 and also 1.1.22-beta

When removing items from the immutable list the performance is very slow. For an ImmutableList containing 20000 integer values (1...20000) if starting to remove from value 20000 to 1 it takes about 52 seconds to remove all items from the list. If I do the same with a generic List<T> where I create a copy of the list after each remove operation it takes about 500 ms.

I was a bit surprised by these results since I thought the ImmutableList would be faster than copying a generic List<T>, but perhaps this is to be expected?

Example Code

// Generic List Test
var genericList = new List<int>();

var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
for (int i = 0; i < 20000; i++)
{
    genericList.Add(i);
    genericList = new List<int>(genericList);
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("Add duration for List<T>: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
IList<int> completeList = new List<int>(genericList);

sw.Restart();

// Remove from 20000 -> 0.
for (int i = completeList.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    genericList.Remove(completeList[i]);
    genericList = new List<int>(genericList);
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("Remove duration for List<T>: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
Console.WriteLine("Items after remove for List<T>: " + genericList.Count);


// ImmutableList Test
var immutableList = ImmutableList<int>.Empty;

sw.Restart();
for (int i = 0; i < 20000; i++)
{
    immutableList = immutableList.Add(i);
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("Add duration for ImmutableList<T>: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

sw.Restart();

// Remove from 20000 -> 0.
for (int i = completeList.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    immutableList = immutableList.Remove(completeList[i]);
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("Remove duration for ImmutableList<T>: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
Console.WriteLine("Items after remove for ImmutableList<T>: " + immutableList.Count);

Update

If removing items from the start of the ImmutableList, like with a normal foreach loop, then performance is a lot better. Removing all items then takes less than 100 ms. This is not something you can do in all scenarios, but can be good to know.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried using the RemoveAt method? See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn456151.aspx – Kris Vandermotten Jul 16 '14 at 16:39
    
I've deleted, now, 2 answers because I mis-understood the above code and the implementation of ImmutableList. @Servy had some useful comments on the nature of ImmutableList - "It's implemented as a binary search tree", which are lost in my deleted posts. – antiduh Jul 16 '14 at 16:56
    
Have not tried RemoveAt @KrisVandermotten because it is not useful in my real world scenario. Will probably stick to the old List<T> and do a combination of locking and snapshots instead of using the ImmutableList<T>. – Thomas Jul 17 '14 at 12:21
    
If RemoveAt is not useful in your real world scenario, then this test is not representative for your real world scenario either. You are removing at the end of the list, which is a special case that happens to be fast on a mutable list. – Kris Vandermotten Jul 18 '14 at 15:32
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The Remove method has to scan the entire list to find the element to remove. The removal itself is O(1) because only the last element needs to be popped off. Both algorithms have quadratic performance.

Why the enormous difference in run time? Probably, because ImmutableList is a tree structure internally. This means that to scan the list there are high amounts of pointer dereferencing and unpredictable branches and memory accesses. That is very slow.

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