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I forgot how to reference another function into a function in C++? In python it is declare as a class so that I can use it.

double footInches(double foot)
{
 double inches = (1.0/12.00) * foot;
 return inches;
}

double inchMeter(double inch)
{
 double meter = 39.37 * (footInches(inch));
 return meter;
}

I want to reference footInches in inchMeter.

edited

here is the main program

int main()
{
 double feet, inch, meter, x = 0;

 cout << "Enter distance in feet to convert it to meter: " << endl;
 cin >> x;

 cout << inchMeter(x);

 return 0;

i think the last line is not correct. i want to get the x in footInches first, then go to inchMeter, and then return the answer from inchMeter.

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3  
I think you mean inch instead of inches in that call to footInches. –  Eric Mar 19 '10 at 15:44
    
Once you correct the misspelling of inches (should be inch), your code should run fine. If you get any error, please provide us with the exact commands you are using and with the full output of the error. –  Francesco Mar 19 '10 at 15:49
3  
Also, there are 12 inches to the foot, not the other way round. And 39.37 US inches in a metre, so you don't need to call footInches from inchMeter at all. –  Mike Seymour Mar 19 '10 at 15:51
    
Your main problem then is conversion to inches from feet. –  Billy ONeal Mar 19 '10 at 15:56
    
Just a heads-up, your declaration of feet, inch, meter in main is pointless and accomplishes nothing. If you're expecting these variables to be manipulated by your functions, you are mistaken. The variables being used in the functions are in a different scope, so they are distinct from the ones in main. –  Eric Mar 19 '10 at 15:59
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2 Answers 2

By reference do you mean call?
You are calling the function correctly in your example, but you don't need the surrounding parenthesis.

So simply like this:

double inchMeter(double inch)
{
 double meter = 39.3700787 * footInches(inch);
 return meter;
}

If your functions exist in different .cpp files, or you need to reference a function that is defined later you can use a forward declaration.

Example:

a.cpp:

double footInches(double foot)
{
 double inches = foot * 12.0;
 return inches;
}

b.cpp:

double footInches(double foot); //This is a forward declaration

double inchMeter(double inch)
{
 double meter = 39.3700787 * footInches(inch);
 return meter;
}
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hi, thanks. just edited my post. there is another prlbme –  CppLearner Mar 19 '10 at 15:52
    
If it's easier for you, simply call footInches function, store the result then call the next inchMeters. Or combine the 2 calls like so: inchMeters(footInches(foot)) –  Brian R. Bondy Mar 19 '10 at 15:58
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The traditional way to "reference" an arbitrary function in C is to use a function pointer. You really don't need it here because you're not going to change the implementation of the toinches function at runtime, but if you need a "reference to a function" you do it like this:

//Declare a function type that does what you want.
typedef double (*inch_converter_t)(double foot)

double footInches(double foot)
{
 double inches = (1.0/12.00) * foot;
 return inches;
};

//Pass a function pointer to another function for use.
double inchMeter(double inch, inch_converter_t converter)
{
 double meter = 39.37 * (converter(inch)); //Making a function call with the pointer.
 return meter;
}

int main()
{
    inch_converter_t myConverter = footInches;
    doube result = inchMeter(42, myConverter); //Call with function pointer.
}
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