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I'm attempting to guess and prove the Big O for:

f(n) = n^3 - 7n^2 + nlg(n) + 10

I guess that big O is n^3 as it is the term with the largest order of growth

However, I'm having trouble proving it. My unsuccesful attempt follows:

f(n) <= cg(n)
f(n) <= n^3 - 7n^2 + nlg(n) + 10 <= cn^3 
f(n) <= n^3 + (n^3)*lg(n) + 10n^3 <= cn^3
f(n) <= N^3(11 + lg(n)) <= cn^3

so 11 + lg(n) = c

But this can't be right because c must be constant. What am I doing wrong?

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This might be a good question for Math Overflow - mathoverflow.net –  Ryan Thames Mar 19 '10 at 17:10
3  
@Ryan, as I was informed recently, mathoverflow is interested only in research level math questions. It's probably not good for us to keep sending them simple problems. –  Carl Norum Mar 19 '10 at 17:13
1  
this might be a bad question for math overflow: (from the FAQ) "MathOverflow's primary goal is for users to ask and answer research level math questions, the sorts of questions you come across when you're writing or reading articles or graduate level books. " –  Jimmy Mar 19 '10 at 17:13
    
MathOverflow is not for undergraduate-level questions. –  user287792 Mar 19 '10 at 17:14
    
@Carl Ahh, good point. –  Ryan Thames Mar 19 '10 at 17:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

For any base b, we know that there always exists an n0 > 0 such that

log(n)/log(b) < n whenever n >= n0

Thus,

n^3 - 7n^2 + nlg(n) + 10 < n^3 - 7n^2 + n^2 + 10 when n >= n0.

You can solve from there.

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Nice and simple. +1. –  danben Mar 19 '10 at 17:21
    
Thanks, that was the missing link in my understanding. –  halohunter Mar 19 '10 at 17:37

For your question, the proof of O(n^3) should look something like this:

f(n) <= n^3 + 7n^2 + nlg(n) + 10 for (n > 0)
f(n) <= n^3 + 7n^3 + nlg(n) + 10 for (n > 0)
f(n) <= n^3 + 7n^3 + n*n^2 + 10  for (n > 2)
f(n) <= n^3 + 7n^3 + n^3 + 10  for (n > 2)
f(n) <= n^3 + 7n^3 + n^3 + n^3 for (n > 3)
f(n) <= 10n^3 for (n > 3)

Therefore f(n) is O(n^3) for n > 3 and k = 10.

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2  
Solving problems that are likely homework is generally discouraged. –  danben Mar 19 '10 at 17:28
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@danben: I don't think so. Even though many think it should be, there are also many who take the view that questions should just be answered, not ifs and buts. –  Svante Mar 19 '10 at 17:57
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It is fine to answer a question, rather than hinting at the solution, but the answer should further the OP's understanding of the problem domain. This answer doesn't help the OP at all, short of cut and pasting it into his or her homework assignment. –  rjh Mar 19 '10 at 19:16
    
@Svante - Here is a link to the guidelines (that are in turn linked by the faq): meta.stackexchange.com/questions/10811/… –  danben Mar 19 '10 at 19:47
    
@danben: that answer is neither official nor binding. I just don't see the "generally". Sure, I usually would not completely solve homework for others either, but I will definitely not downvote correct answers. –  Svante Mar 19 '10 at 20:36

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