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A specially constructed string is printed differently when I use

print $b;

or

print for split //, $b;

A minimal example is:

#!perl
use warnings;
use strict;

use Encode;

my $b = decode 'utf8', "\x{C3}\x{A1}\x{E2}\x{80}\x{93}\x{C3}\x{A1}"; # 'á–á' in Unicode;

print $b, "\n";
print for split //, $b

The output on the console screen (I think I use cp860) is:

Wide character in print at xx.pl line 9.
├íÔÇô├í
Wide character in print at xx.pl line 10.
ßÔÇôß

or in hex:

C3 A1 E2 80 93 C3 A1 
E1 E2 80 93 E1

(separated by 0D 0A of course, i.e., \r\n).

The question is WHY is the character rendered differently?

Surprisingly, the effect disappears without the em-dash. The effect is seen for longer strings, as the following example shows.

For the string 'Él es mi tío Toño –Antonio Pérez' (typed as Unicode in the program; note that the two lines are different!):

Wide character in print at xx.pl line 14.
├ël es mi t├¡o To├▒o ÔÇôAntonio P├®rez
Wide character in print at xx.pl line 15.
╔l es mi tÝo To±o ÔÇôAntonio PÚrez

However, for the string 'Él es mi tío Toño, Antonio Pérez':

╔l es mi tÝo To±o, Antonio PÚrez
╔l es mi tÝo To±o, Antonio PÚrez

nothing bad happens, and the two lines are rendered in the same way. The only difference is the presence of an en-dash , i.e., '\x{E2}\x{80}\x{93}'!

Also, print join '', split //, $b; gives the same result as print $b; but different from print for split //, $b;.

If I add binmode STDOUT, 'utf8';, then both outputs are ÔÇô├í = E2 80 93 C3 A1.

So my question is not exactly about how to avoid it, but about why this happens: why does the same string behave differently when split?

Apparently in both cases the utf8 flag is on. Here is a more detailed program that shows more information about both strings: $a before decode and $b after decode:

#!perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use 5.010;

use Encode;

my $a = "\x{C3}\x{A1}\x{E2}\x{80}\x{93}\x{C3}\x{A1}"; # 'á–á' in Unicode;
my $b = decode 'utf8', $a;

say '------- length and utf8 ---------';
say "Length (a)=", length $a, ", is_uft8(a)=", (Encode::is_utf8 ($a) // 'no'), ".";
say "Length (b)=", length $b, ", is_uft8(b)=", (Encode::is_utf8 ($b) // 'no'), ".";
say '------- as a variable---------';
say "a: $a";
say "b: $b", ' <== *** WHY?! ***';
say '------- split ---------';
print "a: "; print for split //, $a; say '';
print "b: "; print for split //, $b; say ' <== *** DIFFERENT! ***';
say '------- split with spaces ---------';
print "a: "; print "[$_] " for split //, $a; say '';
print "b: "; print "[$_] " for split //, $b; say '';
say '------- split with properties ---------';
print "a: "; print "[$_ is_utf=" . Encode::is_utf8 ($_) . " length=" . length ($_) . "] " for split //, $a; say '';
print "b: "; print "[$_ is_utf=" . Encode::is_utf8 ($_) . " length=" . length ($_) . "] " for split //, $b; say '';
say '------- ord() ---------';
print "a: "; print ord, " " for split //, $a; say '';
print "b: "; print ord, " " for split //, $b; say '';

and here is its output on the console:

------- length and utf8 ---------
Length (a)=7, is_uft8(a)=.
Length (b)=3, is_uft8(b)=1.
------- as a variable---------
a: ├íÔÇô├í
Wide character in say at x.pl line 16.
b: ├íÔÇô├í <== *** WHY?! ***
------- split ---------
a: ├íÔÇô├í
Wide character in print at x.pl line 19.
b: ßÔÇôß <== *** DIFFERENT! ***
------- split with spaces ---------
a: [├] [í] [Ô] [Ç] [ô] [├] [í]
Wide character in print at x.pl line 22.
b: [ß] [ÔÇô] [ß]
------- split with properties ---------
a: [├ is_utf= length=1] [í is_utf= length=1] [Ô is_utf= length=1] [Ç is_utf= length=1] [ô is_utf= length=1] [├ is_utf= length=1] [í is_utf= length=1]
Wide character in print at x.pl line 25.
b: [ß is_utf=1 length=1] [ÔÇô is_utf=1 length=1] [ß is_utf=1 length=1]
------- ord() ---------
a: 195 161 226 128 147 195 161
b: 225 8211 225
share|improve this question
1  
Please avoid using my $a and my $b. It can mess up sort and some commonly used library subs. – ikegami Jul 17 '14 at 2:12
    
Yes, right! I used them just for ease of reading :-) In a real program must not be used. – Alexander Gelbukh Jul 17 '14 at 2:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The difference is whether the string being printed contains any characters >255. print only knows you did something wrong in that situation[1].


Given a handle with no :encoding, print expects a string of bytes (string of characters ≤255).

When it doesn't receive bytes (the string contains characters >255), it notifies you of the error ("wide character") and guesses that you meant to encode the string using UTF-8.

You can think of print on a handle with no :encoding as doing the following:

if ($s =~ /[^\x00-\xFF]/) {
   warn("Wide character");
   utf8::encode($s);
}

my $b = decode 'utf8', "\x{C3}\x{A1}\x{E2}\x{80}\x{93}\x{C3}\x{A1}";

is the same as

my $b = "\xE1\x{2013}\xE1";

As such, you are doing

print "\xE1\x{2013}\xE1";
print "\xE1";
print "\x{2013}";
print "\xE1";
  1. print "\xE1\x{2013}\xE1";   # Wide char! C3 A1 E2 80 93 C3 A1
    

    Perl notices you forgot to encode, warns you, and prints the string encoded using UTF-8.

  2. print "\xE1";               # E1
    

    Perl has no way of knowing you forgot to encode, so it prints what you asked it to print.

  3. print "\x{2013}";           # Wide char! E2 80 93
    

    Perl notices you forgot to encode, warns you, and prints the string encoded using UTF-8.


Footnotes

  1. The choice of storage format (as returned by is_utf8) should never have an effect. print is correctly unaffected by it.

    utf8::downgrade( my $d = chr(0xE1) );  print($d);  # UTF8=0 prints E1
    utf8::upgrade(   my $u = chr(0xE1) );  print($u);  # UTF8=1 prints E1
    
share|improve this answer
    
Aha, now I understand! Very simple: print interprets the entire string as utf8 if the string contains at least one character above the ASCII range. When I split the string, then print interprets as utf8 only those individual characters (1-character strings) that are above the ASCII range and leaves others interpreted as ASCII. – Alexander Gelbukh Jul 17 '14 at 2:52
1  
print interprets the whole string as Unicode Code Points needing encoding if the string contains at least one character above 255. (UTF-8 is what it ends with; not what it starts with. The ASCII encodings only have 128 characters, and print doesn't assume the characters are text like the mention of ASCII suggests.) – ikegami Jul 17 '14 at 3:42
    
Had to read this a few 100 times before I understood what you meant. By default, perl won't print out any code points > 255, so it converts the entire string BACK into bytes (code points <= 255) that it CAN print. I think it would make sense to just print the code points as they are. In the example, he knows he decoded the bytes already, yet perl assumes the exact opposite? Either printing ?s or error out and refusing to print anything I think would be better. "Your string contains chars that I can't print so I cannot process the request". I dont see where that auto-encoding would be useful. – Despertar Jul 18 '14 at 1:33
    
Re "By default, perl won't print out any code points > 255", Correct. It can't. Files can only contain bytes. Anything other than bytes needs to be converted to byte. :encoding tells Perl how to do that. – ikegami Jul 18 '14 at 3:56
    
Re "I think it would make sense to just print the code points as they are." That makes no sense. 0x2660 cannot be placed in a file. – ikegami Jul 18 '14 at 3:57

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