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Considering that I have a matrix (mXn) like this:

0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 1 | 2 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 4 | 9 | 4 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
1 | 2 | 9 | # | 9 | 2 | 1 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 4 | 9 | 4 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 1 | 2 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0

Where there is a spot # randomly set. The values near that, are affected in a form of wave. The closer to that spot, closer the value gets to 10.

Which algorithm would work well on finding #, assuming it will be used on larger scales?

EDIT: I am more interested on how to find the the first non-zero number, than find # itself, which is the purpose, but not the real problem. Imagine a huge matrix full of zero and somewhere that # is hiding. The exhaustive part of the algorithm is to find the first non-zero.

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Is the matrix assumed to be stored as a double[][], or what is the data type? –  Vulcan Jul 17 at 1:44
    
How big is the wave of non-zero values (as a percentage of the entire matrix)? For example if you start in the middle, are you likely to be in or very near the wave, or is it going to be tiny in a sea of zeroes? –  lc. Jul 17 at 1:44
    
@Vulcan The example I had was on double, assuming that would be possible to the radius be more precise. But there is no really need for. –  Patrick Bard Jul 17 at 1:45
    
@lc I don't really know how to answer this. The radius of the wave represent always the same distance, regardless the matrix size. –  Patrick Bard Jul 17 at 1:51
1  
This isn't exactly an answer, and I guess theoretically it doesn't improve the complexity down from normal O(n^2), but it should provide a significant speedup: Boundary cases aside, you can traverse the search for a non-zero number by skipping 7 entries (or however many boxes to the sides of the # will be filled) to the right and to the bottom. After finding a non-zero number just track it as others have mentioned in below answers. –  Jimmy Jul 17 at 2:19

14 Answers 14

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Finding the first non-zero value only works when the signal is symmetric and contain no rotation. Consider the following example borrowed from Internet (zero = blue, max = red), note the first-non-zero value is somewhere by the top right corner:

enter image description here

You might want to have a look at gradient descent. The general algorithm is defined for continuous functions (yours is discrete), but you can still use it.

It basically gets initialized somewhere in your matrix, looks for the gradient at that point and moves in that direction, then repeat until it converges. You can initialize it by sampling randomly (pick a random cell until you get to a non-zero value, you could expect this to be faster than traversing and finding a non zero value in average, naturally depending on your matrix and signal size)

Some properties:

  • Generally faster than an exhaustive search (iterating whole matrix)
  • The bigger the search space gets (matrix) the faster it is comparatively with an exhaustive search.
  • You are still fine even when the signal is not symmetric and centred (first non-zero aligned with the maximum value), can handle more complex signals!
  • The same method can be used for 1 dimensional signals or scale to n-dimensions (which is kind-of cool if you think about it, and quite useful too :] )

Limitations:

  • It can oscillate forever without converge to a value, specially on a discrete function, you need to handle this case in your code.
  • You are not guaranteed to find the global maximum (can get caught in a local one, there are methods to overcome this)
  • You need to either interpolate your function (not all, just a few cells, not a difficult thing to do, I wouldn't use linear interpolation) or make some adaptations to the algorithm (calculating the gradient in a discrete function vs. a continuous one, not difficult)

This might be an overkill for you, it might be appropriate, I don't know, you don't provide more detail but it might be worth it to have a look at it. Note that there's a whole family of algorithms, with many variations and optimizations. Have a look at the Wikipedia article first ;)

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I don't think gradient descent is going to work well here because of the particular properties of this problem. The gradient will be 0 everywhere except near the wave at which point (depending on the radius) the problem is solved. –  waTeim Jul 17 at 10:03
    
It works on a more general case where the "shape" of the wave is unknown or rotated (in the example seems to be a 2D gaussian? but not specified if that's always the case). Naturally, in any case you need to find the signal first, if the signal is relatively large you have good odds of finding it "sampling randomly" faster than exhaustively, but it doesn't matter. The point is that you can go faster with GD when the signal form is unknown and it pays off when the search space is large. –  Xocoatzin Jul 17 at 10:54
2  
You're right, it does cover a larger set of problems and OP hasn't specified. If the wave is large then gradient descent could be much faster finding # than brute force. A super cool result would be determining how big must the radius be before the extra cost of calculating the partial derivatives is paid back by the search efficiency. –  waTeim Jul 17 at 11:40
    
@Xocoatzin I personally find this really interesting. True, that I didn't give to many information, giving just a simple example. However you did great looking for something different like this. I actually need this ability to find on a non-symmetric wave (imagine a wave with a "bitten part" or even worse scenarios), but I thought to start with and ask about a basic example, as premature optimization is the root of all evil. Then, having a good base from the community, I could create my own solution for the worst scenarios ones. –  Patrick Bard Jul 24 at 6:13
    
@PatrickBard I'm glad it was useful to you and hopefully for someone else. –  Xocoatzin Jul 24 at 7:28

You can take the sum of each row and column and # will be at the row and column with the largest sum. This wouldn't work of course if you have multiple #'s but it should eliminate the need to make comparisons and remove any sort of complicated looping algorithms. Not to mention calculating the sum of an array is a very fast operation compared to making comparisons.

Hint: sum[x] = IntStream.of(row[1]).sum();

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2  
Totally forgot about sum of rows. That's a good thing :) –  Patrick Bard Jul 17 at 2:41
    
I almost didn't post this answer because I thought there was going to be a reason you couldn't use it. I'm glad it's got you thinking! –  rosscowar Jul 17 at 2:45
1  
I still don't know that this function could be used, as this software should represent an specific abstraction. But so far, it looks like a good answer. –  Patrick Bard Jul 17 at 2:50
3  
I have doubts about your claim that "calculating the sum of an array is a very fast operation compared to making comparisons," but a solid idea nonetheless. With that said, however, the center isn't actually at the row and column with the largest sum, even in the example case, due to the high values diagonal to the center of the wave. –  Vulcan Jul 17 at 3:11
14  
This isn't any faster than looking at all the elements individually. –  immibis Jul 17 at 3:49

You probably won't be able to avoid scanning the entire matrix in the worst case, but you might be able to shave off some run time in the average case by scanning at progressively increasing resolution.

So for example, you'd start out by taking samples at some (arbitrarily chosen) large distance, leaving you with 2 possibilities:

  • you either have found a point with non-zero value -> then you can use some other technique to "home in" locally on the peak as necessary (like the "gradient ascent" as mentioned in some of the other answers)

  • your search comes up empty -> that means the scan resolution was too large, the wave "fell through the cracks", as it were. Then your algorithm would reduce the resolution (say, by halving it) and run another scan (if done cleverly, you could even skip those points you already sampled in the previous run), just finer grained

So you'd keep scanning at progressively smaller resolutions until you find what you're looking for - the first few "rough" scans would be faster, but have a smaller chance of being successful, but (depending on some factors, like the size of the full matrix compared to the size of the "wavelets") you will, on average, have a good chance to find the target before you have to reduce the resolution far enough to have to scan the entire matrix element-by-element.

To illustrate:

First scan:

#-------#-------
----------------
----------------
----------------
----------------
----------------
----------------
----------------
#-------#-------
----------------
----------------
----------------
----------------
----------------
----------------
----------------

Second scan:

o---#---o---#---
----------------
----------------
----------------
#---#---#---#---
----------------
----------------
----------------
o---#---o---#---
----------------
----------------
----------------
#---#---#---#---
----------------
----------------
----------------

Third scan:

o-#-o-#-o-#-o-#-
----------------
#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-
----------------
o-#-o-#-o-#-o-#-
----------------
#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-
----------------
o-#-o-#-o-#-o-#-
----------------
#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-
----------------
o-#-o-#-o-#-o-#-
----------------
#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-
----------------

And so on (with '#' being the newly sampled cells, and 'o' being previously sampled cells, which can be skipped)...

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First split the entire matrix into 7x7 small matrices as overlaps among the matrices are minimized.

Once split the matrix into small matrices, traverse or randomly pick some points of each small matrix to check whether there exists non-zero values.

If you find any non-zero values from a small matrix, find # from that non-zero value.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any reasoning behind 7x7 partitions, or is that simply arbitrary? –  Vulcan Jul 17 at 2:08
    
Would ask that too. Matrix I presented was an example. –  Patrick Bard Jul 17 at 2:10
1  
@Vulcan Because the size of wave in the example is 7x7. –  Heejin Jul 17 at 2:20
    
@Heejin I realized a little after. But wouldn't be possible that the division creates small matrix where the probabilities to find zeros were higher? So, ins't there a more specific way to search inside the small ones? –  Patrick Bard Jul 17 at 2:25
    
@PatrickBard If you have some prior knowledge about the environment, you can calculate a prior probability about the wave before the inference and check the points where the prior probabilities are higher than others, but it's over engineering to do that which usually done in scientific researches. If you are interested in the subject, I recommend to read this wiki article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayesian_inference, but I don't recommend applying that method on your problem. –  Heejin Jul 17 at 3:57

Traverse the matrix from 0,0 until you hit a non-zero value.

Once you hit a non-zero value, look at the top, right, bottom, left neighbors to find to biggest one (if there are more than one, just pick one of them).

At then do then same thing again on the biggest one you just pick, look at its 4 neighbors and find the biggest one until you hit #.

share|improve this answer
1  
That process until hit a non-zero value is the one I am worried about. It looks like I will make lots of unnecessary comparisons. –  Patrick Bard Jul 17 at 2:19
    
Also you don't need to traverse by units of 1 as the non zero's are clumped together, so depending on the minimum reach of the effect of the # you can skip a certain number of rows and columns. for the example above you have a 5x5 block of non 0's so you can just look at every 5th Row and every 5th column until you find a non 0. –  Chimeara Jul 17 at 6:03
    
It's not the comparisons what would slow this down (each is computed in a single CPU instruction), it is the "accessing to a whole bunch of memory" the slow part (this might illustrate it better). If you are reading sequentially from memory, it still quite efficient though. It strongly relies on having the first-non-zero value aligned with the maximum, which might not always be true, but still faster in average than the row/column sum approach by @rosscowar –  Xocoatzin Jul 17 at 7:38

If the surrounding pattern is always the same, so depending on values of the neighbor elements and the first non zero number we encounter, we can always predict the correct position of the # spot in O(1) time.

 First non zero element-->| 1 | 1 | 2 |
                        0 | 1 | 4 | 9 |
                        1 | 2 | 9 | # |

For example, if the first non zero number is 1 and the right element is 1, down is 1 and right - bottom diagonal is 4, so the # is at (i + 2, j + 2) with (i,j) is the position of current element.

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Assuming the pattern is always the same, you want to check every five cells in every direction, starting at [2][2] until you find something non zero. So you'll check [2][2], [2][7], [2][12], ..., [7][2], [7][7], [7][12], ..., [12][2], ... and so on.

Once you've found one of these cells with a non-zero value, you can just check its neighbours and the neighbours of its neighbours to find the # character.

This is O(n^2), which is the best you can do, because you can't avoid having to check O(n^2) cells.

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Another possible approach is to iterate through cells until the first non-zero number is found. Because that non-zero number is guaranteed to be in the same column as the center of the wave do to the properties of the wave, we can then simply iterate through the column until we find the point at which an aba pattern (9#9 in the example case) is found, where the b value would be the center of the wave.

Assumptions:

  • Full wave exists in the matrix so that the furthest extents of the wave are present, allowing the first non-zero number to be found.
  • The central value is unique to the extent that it doesn't equal other values in the same column, otherwise the algorithm will find one of the center's surrounding values to be the center.

Code:

// iterate through cells
for (int y = 0; y < matrix.length; y++) {
    for (int x = 0; x < matrix[0].length; x++) {
        if (matrix[y][x] > 0) { // first non-zero value, in this case at point 3,3
            int cellCurr = 0;
            int cellOnePrev = 0;
            int cellTwoPrev = 0;
            for (; y < matrix.length; y++) { // iterate down rest of column
                cellCurr = matrix[y][x];
                if (cellCurr == cellTwoPrev) { // aba pattern found, center is b
                    System.out.println("found " + cellOnePrev + " at " + x + "," + (y - 1));
                    return;
                }
                // update necessary values
                cellTwoPrev = cellOnePrev;
                cellOnePrev = cellCurr;
            }
        }
    }
}

Output for the example case with 10 in place of #:

found 10 at 3,6
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According to the edit, the main intention is to find the first non-zero entry. This makes sense. Once you have found this, you can trivially use a gradient-ascend method to find the maximum value: Just walk from the current entry to the neighbor with the highest value in each step, until you reached the top.

However, some possibly important details are missing. For example, it might be important to know the shape of the wave. In the original question, it seems to have some gaussian form. Could it also be more "flat"? That is, could the same maximum value cause a larger area of the matrix to be filled with non-zero entries?

The key point here is - for the first, trivial optimization - to know the diameter of the area that contains non-zero entries. If you know that the diameter of the area with non-zero entries is, for example, n, then you can traverse the matrix with a step size of n-1 and be sure that you will not miss the wave.

If there really is no information about the possible location of the wave, then I doubt that there will be much room for improvements. If it can be anywhere, you'll have to search everywhere.

But ven for the trivial search (regardless of whether the step size is 1 or n-1), there may be decisions that influence the overall performance. Most prominently: Caching effects. Here is an example that places "waves" into matices of various sizes. (Note that the "waves" are actually rectangular, based on the moore neighborhood of the entry with the maximum value, for simplicity).

It searches for the first non-zero entry using three methods:

  • findNonZeroSimpleA: Just runs over the matrix, column major
  • findNonZeroSimpleB: Just runs over the matrix, row major
  • findNonZeroSkipping: Just runs over the matrix, column major, with a step size of n-1

This is not a "benchmark"

It only gives a rough indication about the performance differences. Some results for my PC (not telling much about the setup, because it is not a benchmark): For a 8000x8000 matrix, with the maximum value being 10, located at (6000,6000), the running time for the three approaches is

  • findNonZeroSimpleA: 28.783 ms
  • findNonZeroSimpleB 831.323 ms
  • findNonZeroSkipping 2.203 ms

As you can see, the largest difference is implied by the traversal order (just by swapping two lines - make sure to use the right one here!). The "skipping" approach decreases the running time roughly by a factor that corresponds to the wave size. (The result may be distorted here as well, again due to caching effects, when the wave size is "large" - but fortunately, these are exactly the cases where the skipping approach would be particularly beneficial).

import java.awt.Point;

public class WaveMatrixTest
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        //basicTest();
        speedTest();
    }

    private static void basicTest()
    {
        int size = 30;
        int maxValue = 10;
        int array[][] = new int[size][size];
        placeValue(array, maxValue, 15, 15);
        System.out.println(toString2D(array));
    }

    private static void speedTest()
    {
        int maxValue = 10;
        int runs = 10;
        for (int size=2000; size<=8000; size*=2)
        {
            for (int run=0; run<runs; run++)
            {
                int x = size/2+size/4;
                int y = size/2+size/4;
                runTestSimpleA(size, maxValue, x, y);
                runTestSimpleB(size, maxValue, x, y);
                runTestSkipping(size, maxValue, x, y);
            }
        }

    }

    private static void runTestSimpleA(int size, int maxValue, int x, int y)
    {
        int array[][] = new int[size][size];
        placeValue(array, maxValue, x, y);

        long before = System.nanoTime();
        Point p = findNonZeroSimpleA(array, maxValue);
        long after = System.nanoTime();

        System.out.printf("SimpleA,  size %5d max at %5d,%5d took %.3f ms, result %s\n",
            size, x, y, (after-before)/1e6, p);
    }

    private static void runTestSimpleB(int size, int maxValue, int x, int y)
    {
        int array[][] = new int[size][size];
        placeValue(array, maxValue, x, y);

        long before = System.nanoTime();
        Point p = findNonZeroSimpleB(array, maxValue);
        long after = System.nanoTime();

        System.out.printf("SimpleB,  size %5d max at %5d,%5d took %.3f ms, result %s\n",
            size, x, y, (after-before)/1e6, p);
    }

    private static void runTestSkipping(int size, int maxValue, int x, int y)
    {
        int array[][] = new int[size][size];
        placeValue(array, maxValue, x, y);

        long before = System.nanoTime();
        Point p = findNonZeroSkipping(array, maxValue);
        long after = System.nanoTime();

        System.out.printf("Skipping, size %5d max at %5d,%5d took %.3f ms, result %s\n",
            size, x, y, (after-before)/1e6, p);
    }

    private static void placeValue(int array[][], int maxValue, int x, int y)
    {
        int sizeX = array.length;
        int sizeY = array[0].length;
        int n = maxValue;
        for (int dx=-n; dx<=n; dx++)
        {
            for (int dy=-n; dy<=n; dy++)
            {
                int cx = x+dx;
                int cy = y+dy;
                if (cx >= 0 && cx < sizeX &&
                    cy >= 0 && cy < sizeY)
                {
                    int v = maxValue - Math.max(Math.abs(dx), Math.abs(dy));
                    array[cx][cy] = v;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private static Point findNonZeroSimpleA(int array[][], int maxValue)
    {
        int sizeX = array.length;
        int sizeY = array[0].length;
        for (int x=0; x<sizeX; x++)
        {
            for (int y=0; y<sizeY; y++)
            {
                if (array[x][y] != 0)
                {
                    return new Point(x,y);
                }
            }
        }
        return null;
    }

    private static Point findNonZeroSimpleB(int array[][], int maxValue)
    {
        int sizeX = array.length;
        int sizeY = array[0].length;
        for (int y=0; y<sizeY; y++)
        {
            for (int x=0; x<sizeX; x++)
            {
                if (array[x][y] != 0)
                {
                    return new Point(x,y);
                }
            }
        }
        return null;
    }

    private static Point findNonZeroSkipping(int array[][], int maxValue)
    {
        int size = maxValue * 2 - 1;
        int sizeX = array.length;
        int sizeY = array[0].length;
        for (int x=0; x<sizeX; x+=size)
        {
            for (int y=0; y<sizeY; y+=size)
            {
                if (array[x][y] != 0)
                {
                    return new Point(x,y);
                }
            }
        }
        return null;
    }


    private static String toString2D(int array[][])
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        int sizeX = array.length;
        int sizeY = array[0].length;
        for (int x=0; x<sizeX; x++)
        {
            for (int y=0; y<sizeY; y++)
            {
                sb.append(String.format("%3d", array[x][y]));
            }
            sb.append("\n");
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }

}
share|improve this answer

The most important thing in your case is to reach first non zero value, there are a few ways to do that, different situations requires different steps so I'll post two kinda universal ways.

CASE I. Wave affected area is big compared to all area

My advice is: travel diagonally.

You should start from corner and move diagonally until reach first non-zero value. After that traveling system changes.

CASE II Wave affected area is small compared to all area

My advice: play chess.

You should start from corner and move like on chess board (see example) enter image description here

Do this until reach the first non zero value. And here traveling system changes.


After reached non zero value do this: check all 8 (actually 5 is enough, you don't need to check from the corner you came, however this minor thing could be hard to implement) surrounding areas and move to the biggest value. Repeat such step until you find #.

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Because there is no writing tasks I would use multi threads to find a non-zero number first and then find # with a single thread. If the matrix is big enough to cancel out the lower performance of thread handling, this would work better than single-thread one.

  1. Split the matrix in multiple areas
  2. Find a non-zero number sequentially or randomly
  3. Once any non-zero number is found, stop all the threads
  4. Find # with only one threads with a proper algorithm
share|improve this answer

Assuming you know the limits of the area, finding the first non-zero point should work a bit like playing battleship, except you know the target has both width and height, which is an advantage. Considering the fact that you don't know the size of the non-zero part of the wave, start by assuming it's large and progress towards an assumption of a smaller size.

If the length is 1x1, start by testing 0.33x0.33, 0.33x0.66, 0.66x0.33 and 0.66x0.66. If not found, halve your step size to 0.33/2 and test again until a set of points hits the ship. The tricky part begins when you've found the first point, since no neighbouring point is necessarily of higher value, so in that case you'll have to repeat the first step, looking for something higher than your current level. The previous set of hits determines the new area to look into. If a neighbouring point is of higher level, you move there, obviously.

If the area is large enough, this should be faster than summing the columns and rows, right?

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You can go this way:

First find the largest no. in the matrix, and then go for the location of that max no. in the matrix and finally checking the neighbours will solve the issue of finding #.

a = max(matrix)
[r,c] = find(matrix == a)

then check for neighbors with r+/-1 and c+/-1 and u will find #.

share|improve this answer
0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 1 | 2 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 4 | 9 | 4 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
1 | 2 | 9 | # | 9 | 2 | 1 | 0 | 0 <- this row
0 | 1 | 4 | 9 | 4 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 1 | 2 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
            ^ and this col

loop through rows and columns to find a value closest to 10.

after that, just get the intersection point of this row and column

share|improve this answer
    
The matrix in the question is an example, so this process of finding a value closest to 10 doesn't expand to the general-use case. –  Vulcan Jul 17 at 2:16
    
Shouldn't I have to go check each cell in this way you said? And isn't easier to find smallest first? –  Patrick Bard Jul 17 at 2:17
    
@Vulcan i give an example of my answer based on his example –  chocolate entities Jul 17 at 2:20
    
@PatrickBard why did you searching for the smallest one while you need the random value that surrounded by a value closer to 10?? –  chocolate entities Jul 17 at 2:21
1  
So how would one find the value analogous to 10 in the general-use case? –  Vulcan Jul 17 at 2:21

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