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Lately I've been in the habit of assigning integer values to constants and simply using the constant name as a means of identifying its purpose. However, in some cases this has resulted in the need to write a function like typeToString($const) when a string representation is needed. Obviously this is inefficient and unneccesary, but is only an issue every once and a while.

So my question is, are there any other tradeoffs I should consider? Which case is considered to be cleaner/more standards-compliant? Also, is the performance difference negligable for most cases?

Case 1: (faster when a string version is not needed?)

class Foo {
    const USER_TYPE_ADMIN = 0;
    const USER_TYPE_USER = 1;
    const USER_TYPE_GUEST = 2;

    public $userType = self::USER_TYPE_ADMIN;

    public function __construct($type) {
    	$this->userType = $type;
    }

    public function typeToString() {
    	switch($this->userType) {
    		case self::USER_TYPE_ADMIN:
    			return 'admin';
    			break;

    		case self::USER_TYPE_USER:
    			return 'user';
    			break;

    		case self::USER_TYPE_GUEST:
    			return 'guest';
    			break;

    		default:
    			return 'unknown';
    			break;
    	}
    }
}

$foo = new Foo(Foo::USER_TYPE_GUEST);
echo $foo->typeToString();
// Displays "guest"

Case 2:(faster/easier when a string version is needed)

class Foo {
    const USER_TYPE_ADMIN = 'admin';
    const USER_TYPE_USER = 'user';
    const USER_TYPE_GUEST = 'guest';

    public $userType = self::USER_TYPE_ADMIN;

    public function __construct($type) {
    	$this->userType = $type;
    }
}

$foo = new Foo(Foo::USER_TYPE_GUEST);
echo $foo->userType();
// Displays "guest"
share|improve this question
    
I'm confused - did you mean to change the 0, 1, 2 to "admin", "user", "guest" in case 2? –  Greg Oct 29 '08 at 18:46
    
Yep, I certainly did! :-) Thanks for catching that, it should be updated now. –  Wilco Oct 29 '08 at 18:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The performance difference will be negligible unless you're storing a lot of them. I'd write the toString() method more concisely:

$strings = array
(
    self::USER_TYPE_ADMIN => 'admin',
    self::USER_TYPE_USER => 'user',
);

if (!isset($strings[$type]))
    return 'unknown';

return $strings[$type];

Also, you could make the $strings array a static.

share|improve this answer

In the example you write you could drop all the methods and make the class static and you would have created your self an Enumerator. Like this:

class Enumeration{
  public static const One=1;
  public static const Two=2;
  public static const Three=3;
}

One other handy way to use constants is to use them as application configuration. They are much faster performance wise then parsing an xml file for configuration.

share|improve this answer
    
Nikola, php does not allow "public static" keywords for constants. Your code will generate a syntax error. –  user254518 Jan 20 '10 at 1:24

Blah blah premature optimization.

share|improve this answer
3  
In otherwords: Rules for optimisation. 1) Don't optimise. 2) (For experts only). Don't optimise yet. –  Alya May 19 '09 at 12:45

I think string constants are the best choice in this case. Code looks better.

Of course if you need last bit of performance, use integer constants. But only after you verify with a profiler that string comparisons are the bottleneck. Anyway, in most applications there are many more expensive things, like database access etc.

share|improve this answer

I'll be honest, I don't know if there's a performance "hit" of any kind when you define your constants natively as strings - but if there is one at all I'm willing to bet that it's so small it would be difficult to measure.

Personally, if the constant's value is meaningful as a literal, then just assign it that value. If the constant's value is meaningful only as an option selector (or some other indication of value), then use integers or whatever you choose appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
Comparing strings is more expensive than comparing integers. –  Paweł Hajdan Oct 29 '08 at 18:49
1  
But the difference between 10 string comparisons and 10 integer comparisons is so tiny that if it makes coding easier, it's better to use strings –  Greg Oct 29 '08 at 18:51
2  
Ya phjr, but using integers when you really want strings just to shave milliseconds of milliseconds off each request just absolutely REEKS of pre-optimization. –  Peter Bailey Oct 29 '08 at 19:00

Instead of using const integers I generally just go with strings if I need to print them. So I'd do something like $foo = new Foo('guest');. I can still validate the input in the constructor and I can mark it up whenever I need it.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I'd do too, but the OP seems to have come from a stricter background... maybe an ex C++ or Java programmer :p –  Greg Oct 29 '08 at 18:53
    
I'm currently a C++ developer and even uses strings there in the general case. –  Jasper Bekkers Oct 29 '08 at 20:10

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