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This program is supposed to read in a list of numbers from a file, and print a pattern of *s based on the numbers read in (one at a time) using a recursive method. For example, if the number read in is 4, the pattern should look like this:

        *
      *   *
    *   *   *
  *   *   *   *
    *   *   *
      *   *
        *

However, my code is only printing the top half of this pattern. Here is the code I have:

import java.util.Scanner; 
import java.io.*; 

public class Program3 {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        int num = 0;
        java.io.File file = new java.io.File("../instr/prog3.dat");
        Scanner fin = new Scanner(file);

        while(fin.hasNext()) {
            System.out.println("Please enter an integer");
                 num = fin.nextInt();
                 if(num >=0 && num <= 25) 
                makePattern(num);
        } 

    }

    public static void makePattern(int num) { 
        if(num >= 0 && num <= 25) {
        makePattern(num-1);
            for(int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
                System.out.print("*" + " ");
            }
            System.out.println(); 
        }
    }
}

Here is the output I get when running this program:

Please enter an integer

*
* *
* * *
* * * *
Please enter an integer

*
* *
* * *
Please enter an integer

*
* *
* * *
* * * *
* * * * *
* * * * * *
* * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Please enter an integer
Please enter an integer

It appears to be reading the file in correctly, but how would I get it to repeat the steps to print the bottom half of the pattern. Also, how could I modify my loop in the main method to get rid of those last two "Please enter an integer" statements? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by TheLostMind, JasonMArcher, GregS, Carson Myers, zishe Sep 12 '14 at 20:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try to think of it like this

Every pattern is of the form

pattern(#) = 
Some # of asterisks,
(the evaluation of pattern(# + 1))
Some # of asterisks

Of course, this is missing a critical part of the information, but it should be just enough to start you thinking recursively.

---- Update ----

Basically for recursion to succeed, you need to find a way to know when you are done. That means a recursive function follows the form.

function = if (exit condition) {
  return value 
} else { 
  return some value computed from a call to function
}

The key is to have each subsequent call to the function be "closer" than the answer. For example, a function that calculates the square root might return each digit recursively (it's just an example) until the desired precision is computed.

--- Edited for another update ---

Ok, I'll give you an example. It's not one you really should use, but that's the point.

Consider I have the function add(int, int)

I could write it as so

 int add(int a, int b) {
    return a + b;
 }

but that would not be recursive. One way of doing it recursively would be

 int add(int a, int b) {
   if (b == 0) {
     // exit condition, b is zero
     return a;
   } else if (b > 0) {
     // moving b closer to zero
     return add(a+1, b-1);
   } else {
     // b is negative, moving b closer to zero
     return add(a-1, b+1);
   }
 }

note that in this case, to add(3, 2), I would create the following nested calls

 add(3,2) returns
 +add(4,1) which returns
  +add(5,0) which returns
   +5

Or in other words, it would return 5, but only after it called itself three times (2 times recursively, one time to hit the exit condition).

--- Last update and solution ---

Ok, so you seem to be lacking the proper prerequisites to really understand what I mean... Here is the closest thing you'll get to a full answer (from me)

/*  @param thisRow the number of asterisks in the next row to be printed */
/*  @param needed the number of asterisks in the widest row of the diamond */
void printDiamond(int thisRow, int needed) {
  if (thisRow >= needed) {
    // the row has as many (or more) than we need.
    // terminate recursion.
    for (int i = 0; i < needed; i++) {
       System.out.print("*");
    }
  } else {
    // the row is less than what we need.
    // print out the row.
    for (int i = 0; i < thisRow; i++) {
       System.out.print("*");
    }
    // print out the middle
    printDiamond(thisRow+1, needed);
    // print out the row.
    for (int i = 0; i < thisRow; i++) {
       System.out.print("*");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would give you the answer in full; however, this is a common homework problem. So the exercise is probably not for the purpose of getting an answer (as it is probably for the purpose of getting you to learn how to solve problems like this). –  Edwin Buck Jul 17 '14 at 6:41
    
One more hint, your function needs to take two parameters. Otherwise, you'll never know when to quit adding asterisks. –  Edwin Buck Jul 17 '14 at 6:49
    
Ok cool, this is definitely helpful. I guess the thing that's throwing me off now is what should I return? –  Beth Tanner Jul 17 '14 at 6:52
    
Also, not sure what I should use as the second parameter? I have changed my if statement to read if(num < 0 || num > 25) { would that be correct, or at least closer to correct? –  Beth Tanner Jul 17 '14 at 6:57
    
Well, the functions above have no idea when to quit, so the second parameter needs to be something indicating when you should quit. To safely write a recursive function, you need to first write the quit condition (and the correct output for it) and then write a "get closer" routine. In your case, one more asterisk is closer to the middle.... –  Edwin Buck Jul 17 '14 at 7:05

you haven't considered the spaces that need to be inserted before printing the * use a nested for: first line prints 3 spaces and 1 star second line 2 spaces and 2 stars and so on...

share|improve this answer
    
-1 That's not an answer - it's a comment! –  alfasin Jul 17 '14 at 6:42
    
If Beth could get the number of asterisks right, then Beth could get the number of spaces right, as that's a function of the number of asterisks (and one other piece of information). –  Edwin Buck Jul 17 '14 at 6:43
    
Sorry as I just joined today, I'm not well versed with the system in this site. :) –  user3847720 Jul 17 '14 at 6:45
    
Give it in comment man... –  Orion Jul 18 '14 at 7:04

Make it like this

while(fin.hasNext()) {    
    num = fin.nextInt();
    if(num >0 && num <= 25) {
        System.out.println("Please enter an integer");
        makeUpperPattern(num);
        makeLowerPattern(num-1);
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, this routine couldn't work. There's no middle to it. –  Edwin Buck Jul 17 '14 at 6:48
    
The middle part can be included in either upper part or lower part. That mean if num=4, upper do first 4 row and lower do last 3. –  hk6279 Jul 17 '14 at 6:50
    
Yes, except that your routine is not recursive. Using recursion is part of the point of this problem. There are plenty of ways to do it without recursion, but not many ways to do it using recursion. –  Edwin Buck Jul 17 '14 at 7:18
    
makeUpperPattern and makeLowerPattern can be recursion –  hk6279 Jul 17 '14 at 7:21
    
Why write it twice? There is mirror symmetry, so just use a pattern func(a)=(a (func(a+1) a). You only need one function, and your one function is trivial to "prove" the symmetry. With two functions, you need a "magic number" (-1) to keep them aligned, and the two functions aren't as reusable as one might think (due to the logic you will have to add to keep them space aligned). Like my addition example, it could be implemented across two functions with recursion; but, such an implementation would be very ugly looking, with lots of code smells. –  Edwin Buck Jul 17 '14 at 7:31

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