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What is the best way to convert a UTC datetime into local datetime. It isn't as simple as a getutcdate() and getdate() difference because the difference changes depending on what the date is.

CLR integration isn't an option for me either.

The solution that I had come up with for this problem a few months back was to have a daylight savings time table that stored the beginning and ending daylight savings days for the next 100 or so years, this solution seemed inelegant but conversions were quick (simple table lookup)

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8 Answers 8

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Create two tables and then join to them to convert stored GMT dates to local time:

TimeZones     e.g.
---------     ----
TimeZoneId    19
Name          Eastern (GMT -5)
Offset        -5

Create the daylight savings table and populate it with as much information as you can (local laws change all the time so there's no way to predict what the data will look like years in the future)

DaylightSavings
---------------
TimeZoneId    19
BeginDst      3/9/2008 2:00 AM
EndDst        11/2/2008 2:00 AM

Join them like this:

inner join  TimeZones       tz on x.TimeZoneId=tz.TimeZoneId
left join   DaylightSavings ds on tz.TimeZoneId=ds.LocalTimeZone 
    and x.TheDateToConvert between ds.BeginDst and ds.EndDst

Convert dates like this:

dateadd(hh, tz.Offset + 
    case when ds.LocalTimeZone is not null 
    then 1 else 0 end, TheDateToConvert)
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5  
Because dateadd accepts whole numbers only I stored the offset in minutes to deal with offsets such as 9.5. –  Simon Dec 14 '10 at 0:24

If you're in the US and only interested in going from UTC/GMT to a fixed time zone (such as EDT) this code should suffice. I whipped it up today and believe it's correct but use at your own risk.

Adds a computed column to a table 'myTable' assuming your dates are on the 'date' column. Hope someone else finds this useful.

ALTER TABLE myTable ADD date_edt AS 
  dateadd(hh, 
        -- The schedule through 2006 in the United States was that DST began on the first Sunday in April 
        -- (April 2, 2006), and changed back to standard time on the last Sunday in October (October 29, 2006). 
        -- The time is adjusted at 02:00 local time.
              CASE WHEN YEAR(date) <= 2006 THEN  
                    CASE WHEN 
                              date >=  '4/' + CAST(abs(8-DATEPART(dw,'4/1/' + CAST(YEAR(date) as varchar)))%7 + 1 as varchar) +  '/' + CAST(YEAR(date) as varchar) + ' 2:00' 
                          AND 
                              date < '10/' + CAST(32-DATEPART(dw,'10/31/' + CAST(YEAR(date) as varchar)) as varchar) +  '/' + CAST(YEAR(date) as varchar) + ' 2:00' 
                    THEN -4 ELSE -5 END
              ELSE
        -- By the Energy Policy Act of 2005, daylight saving time (DST) was extended in the United States in 2007. 
        -- DST starts on the second Sunday of March, which is three weeks earlier than in the past, and it ends on 
        -- the first Sunday of November, one week later than in years past. This change resulted in a new DST period 
        -- that is four weeks (five in years when March has five Sundays) longer than in previous years.[35] In 2008 
        -- daylight saving time ended at 02:00 on Sunday, November 2, and in 2009 it began at 02:00 on Sunday, March 8.[36]
                    CASE WHEN 
                              date >= '3/' + CAST(abs(8-DATEPART(dw,'3/1/' + CAST(YEAR(date) as varchar)))%7 + 8 as varchar) +  '/' + CAST(YEAR(date) as varchar) + ' 2:00' 
                          AND 
                              date < 
                                '11/' + CAST(abs(8-DATEPART(dw,'11/1/' + CAST(YEAR(date) as varchar)))%7 + 1 as varchar) +  '/' + CAST(YEAR(date) as varchar) + ' 2:00' 
                    THEN -4 ELSE -5 END
              END
  ,date)
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Not an answer to the actual question, but it solved my issue. Thanks!! –  Bill May 20 '09 at 19:51
    
Glad to hear that someone else found it useful! You're right that it's not a solution for the generic problem that was posed but it should be correct for most places in the US which is where all of my servers happen to be located. –  Bob Albright May 21 '09 at 3:14
    
Thank you for sharing this code. It saved me doing out the date math this morning. –  Erik Giberti Aug 16 '12 at 15:58

A much simpler and generic solution that considers daylight savings. Given an UTC date in "YourDateHere":

--Use Minutes ("MI") here instead of hours because sometimes
--  the UTC offset may be half an hour (e.g. 9.5 hours).
SELECT DATEADD(MI,
               DATEDIFF(MI, SYSUTCDATETIME(),SYSDATETIME()),
               YourUtcDateHere)[LocalDateTime]
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1  
Not sure this code is right. It get the time different of this moment (including DST) and apply it to YourDate, which may or may not have same DST with this moment. –  Sheepy Apr 11 at 5:14
    
I updated the script above. The "YourUtcDateHere" is for a DateTime datatype that has no UTC offset applied to it. –  MikeTeeVee Jul 23 at 6:21

If either of these issues affects you, you should never store local times in the database:

  1. With DST is that there is an "hour of uncertainty" around the falling back period where a local time cannot be unambiguously converted. If exact dates & times are required, then store in UTC.
  2. If you want to show users the date & time in their own timezone, rather than the timezone in which the action took place, store in UTC.
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Or store local time and the time zone offset? Assuming you can capture the time zone offset when you capture the time, this is unambiguous. If you know the time zone offset applicable when the time was captured you can always convert to UTC and is useful if you want to show a range of times across different zones (rather than converting all to the local time zone for example). I keep hearing that it's best practice to store in UTC but to me that's throwing information away. –  Robin M May 23 '09 at 7:54

In Eric Z Beard's answer, the following SQL

inner join  TimeZones       tz on x.TimeZoneId=tz.TimeZoneId 
left join   DaylightSavings ds on tz.TimeZoneId=ds.LocalTimeZone  
    and x.TheDateToConvert between ds.BeginDst and ds.EndDst 

might more accurately be:

inner join  TimeZones       tz on x.TimeZoneId=tz.TimeZoneId 
left join   DaylightSavings ds on tz.TimeZoneId=ds.LocalTimeZone  
    and x.TheDateToConvert >= ds.BeginDst and x.TheDateToConvert < ds.EndDst 

(above code not tested)

The reason for this is that the sql "between" statement is inclusive. On the back-end of DST, this would result in a 2AM time NOT being converted to 1AM. Of course the likelihood of the time being 2AM precisely is small, but it can happen, and it would result in an invalid conversion.

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Larry - you've referred to "Answer 7". I think you might be referring to Eric Z Beard's answer? The 7 that you refer to is reputation and is likely to change. –  Robin M Nov 1 '10 at 17:22
    
Replaced with link to the referred-to answer. –  Aidan Ryan Mar 25 '11 at 19:28

If read-only on the data is required/preferred, use this(inspired by Bob Albright's incorrect solution):

SELECT
  date1, 
  dateadd(hh,
    -- The schedule through 2006 in the United States was that DST began on the first Sunday in April 
    -- (April 2, 2006), and changed back to standard time on the last Sunday in October (October 29, 2006). 
    -- The time is adjusted at 02:00 local time (which, for edt, is 07:00 UTC at the start, and 06:00 GMT at the end).
    CASE WHEN YEAR(date1) <= 2006 THEN
         CASE WHEN 
                  date1 >=  '4/' + CAST((8-DATEPART(dw,'4/1/' + CAST(YEAR(date1) as varchar)))%7 + 1 as varchar) +  '/' + CAST(YEAR(date1) as varchar) + ' 7:00' 
                AND 
                  date1 < '10/' + CAST(32-DATEPART(dw,'10/31/' + CAST(YEAR(date1) as varchar)) as varchar) +  '/' + CAST(YEAR(date1) as varchar) + ' 6:00' 
              THEN -4 ELSE -5 END
    ELSE
        -- By the Energy Policy Act of 2005, daylight saving time (DST) was extended in the United States in 2007. 
        -- DST starts on the second Sunday of March, which is three weeks earlier than in the past, and it ends on 
        -- the first Sunday of November, one week later than in years past. This change resulted in a new DST period 
        -- that is four weeks (five in years when March has five Sundays) longer than in previous years. In 2008 
        -- daylight saving time ended at 02:00 edt (06:00 UTC) on Sunday, November 2, and in 2009 it began at 02:00 edt (07:00 UTC) on Sunday, March 8
        CASE WHEN 
                 date1 >= '3/' + CAST((8-DATEPART(dw,'3/1/' + CAST(YEAR(date1) as varchar)))%7 + 8 as varchar) +  '/' + CAST(YEAR(date1) as varchar) + ' 7:00' 
               AND 
                 date1 < '11/' + CAST((8-DATEPART(dw,'11/1/' + CAST(YEAR(date1) as varchar)))%7 + 1 as varchar) +  '/' + CAST(YEAR(date1) as varchar) + ' 6:00' 
             THEN -4 ELSE -5 END
    END
   , date1) as date1Edt
  from MyTbl

I posted this answer after editing Bob Albright's wrong answer to correct the times and to remove superfluous abs(), but his is a GREAT approach to the problem! It got me started in the right direction. I hate to create this separate answer when his just needs a minor tweak, but my edits were rejected multiple times.

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Maintain a TimeZone table, or shell out with an extended stored proc (xp_cmdshell or a COM component, or your own) and ask the OS to do it. If you go the xp route, you'd probably want to cache the offset for a day.

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I like the answer @Eric Z Beard provided.

However, to avoid performing a join everytime, what about this?

TimeZoneOffsets
---------------
TimeZoneId    19
Begin         1/4/2008 2:00 AM
End           1/9/2008 2:00 AM
Offset        -5
TimeZoneId    19
Begin         1/9/2008 2:00 AM
End           1/4/2009 2:00 AM
Offset        -6
TimeZoneId    20 --Hong Kong for example - no DST
Begin         1/1/1900
End           31/12/9999
Offset        +8

Then

 Declare @offset INT = (Select IsNull(tz.Offset,0) from YourTable ds
 join   TimeZoneOffsets tz on tz.TimeZoneId=ds.LocalTimeZoneId  
 and x.TheDateToConvert >= ds.Begin and x.TheDateToConvert < ds.End)

finally becoming

 dateadd(hh, @offset, TheDateToConvert)
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