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I have an interface, let us call it IConfig. Next, I have some class Runner. Runner takes an IConfig and some other parameters in its constructor.

But when I have multiple IConfig instances, each defining a run, I cannot GetAll the runners, as I get an ActivationException "More than one matching bindings are available."

I am guessing this is because this is not how the StandardKernel expects things to work. What I want, is for the kernel to create a new instance of Runner for each IConfig that has been bound.

Is there some way to do this using ninject, without having to manually create the instances?

Example code of what I want:

Task.WaitAll(kernel.GetAll<IRunner>().Select(r => Task.Run((Action)r.Run)).ToArray());

Example code of what I have to do instead:

IControl control = kernel.Get<IControl>();
Task[] runners = kernel.GetAll<IConfig>()
    .Select(c => new Runner(kernel.Get<IService1>(), kernel.Get<IService2>(), c, control))
    .Select(r => Task.Run((Action)r.Run))
    .ToArray();
Task.WaitAll(runners);
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no out of the box support for scenarios like these. There's lots of ways to achieve what you want, though.

So let's start with

public class Runner
{
    public Runner(IService1 service1, IService2 service2, IConfig config, IControl control)
    {
    }

    public void Run()
    {   
    }
}

Solution 1: We are going to use a .ToFactory() binding to create the runner - featuring Dependency Injection.

public interface IRunnerFactory
{
    // all parameters are passed to the constructor of Runner
    // parameters are matched by name, so make sure they match! ctor(IConfig myconfig) won't work, it must be ctor(IConfig config).
    // but of course you can add more parameters to the ctor and have them injected: ctor(IService1 foo, IControl bar, IConfig config, IService2 foo2)
    Runner Create(IConfig config);
}

public class AllRunner
{
    private readonly IList<IConfig> runnerConfigurations;
    private readonly IRunnerFactory runnerFactory;

    public AllRunner(IList<IConfig> runnerConfigurations, IRunnerFactory runnerFactory)
    {
        this.runnerConfigurations = runnerConfigurations;
        this.runnerFactory = runnerFactory;
    }

    public void RunAll()
    {
        Task[] runners = this.runnerConfigurations
            .Select(this.runnerFactory.Create)
            .Select(runner => Task.Run((Action) runner.Run))
            .ToArray();

        Task.WaitAll(runners);
    }
}


// you could also use .InNamedScope() or maybe InParentScope() or InCallScope() -- see the NamedScope extension!
kernel.Bind<IControl>().To<Control>().InSingletonScope();

// implementation is auto generated.
kernel.Bind<IRunnerFactory>().ToFactory();

kernel.Bind<IConfig>().To<Config1>();
kernel.Bind<IConfig>().To<Config2>();
kernel.Bind<IConfig>().To<Config3>();

Note:


Solution 2

We are going to extend on Solution 1 and use a provider / .ToProvider() binding so we can inject an IReadOnlyCollection<Runner>.

public class RunnersProvider : Provider<IReadOnlyCollection<Runner>>
{
    private readonly IList<IConfig> runnerConfigurations;
    private readonly IRunnerFactory runnerFactory;

    public RunnersProvider(IList<IConfig> runnerConfigurations, IRunnerFactory runnerFactory)
    {
        this.runnerConfigurations = runnerConfigurations;
        this.runnerFactory = runnerFactory;
    }

    protected override IReadOnlyCollection<Runner> CreateInstance(IContext context)
    {
        return this.runnerConfigurations
            .Select(this.runnerFactory.Create)
            .ToArray();
    }
}


kernel.Bind<IReadOnlyCollection<Runner>>().ToProvider<RunnersProvider>();

you can then do

IResolutionRoot.Get<IReadOnlyCollection<Runner>>()

or also inject IReadOnlyCollection<Runner> into a ctor - but not IEnumerable<Runner> or any other type, because you're explicitly binding IReadOnlyCollection<Runner> and not making use of ninject's multi-binding / multi injection feature.

Also you need to note that kernel.Bind<IEnumerable<Foo>>() (same applies to IList<>, ICollection<> and foo[] - all types ninject supports for auto multi-injection) is brittle. You can do kernel.Get<IEnumerable<Foo>>() but you can't ctor-inject the same type, because if you use it for ctor-injection, ninject will try to find bindings matching to Foo and not to IEnumerable<Foo> (the multi injection support).

share|improve this answer
    
This looks promising, but I will need to process this for a bit ^_^ On a related not, the IConfig objects are added using a foreach converting strings from App.config; foreach(IConfig c in Config.Select(JSON<ImportSettings>)) Bind<IConfig>().ToConstant(c); Is there a better way to do that as well? That Config property above is just a wrapper for Properties.Settings.Default... by the way –  Morten Nilsen Jul 17 '14 at 9:24
    
You should consider not binding the IConfig at all. Instead bind a IConfigReader with a method IEnumerable<IConfig> ReadConfig(). –  BatteryBackupUnit Jul 17 '14 at 9:33
    
After trying solution one in combination with the IConfigReader approach, I am getting an error activating IConfig when I call configs.Select(factory.Create).ToList() –  Morten Nilsen Jul 17 '14 at 15:18
    
please post your complete solution (update the question). Where are you trying to inject the IConfig into? –  BatteryBackupUnit Jul 17 '14 at 15:36
    
Got it! the argument had a different name in the constructor than I gave it in the factory interface. It works now ^_^ –  Morten Nilsen Jul 17 '14 at 15:38

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