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I'm writing a chess engine in C# with magic bitboards and it's very slow right now. It takes 2 minutes to calculate perft 6 (119,060,324 positions) from the initial position when other engines can do it in 1-3 seconds. I'm currently using this method to find the indices of all 1s in the bitboard:

public static readonly int[] index64 = {
         0, 47,  1, 56, 48, 27,  2, 60,
         57, 49, 41, 37, 28, 16,  3, 61,
         54, 58, 35, 52, 50, 42, 21, 44,
         38, 32, 29, 23, 17, 11,  4, 62,
         46, 55, 26, 59, 40, 36, 15, 53,
         34, 51, 20, 43, 31, 22, 10, 45,
         25, 39, 14, 33, 19, 30,  9, 24,
         13, 18,  8, 12,  7,  6,  5, 63
    };

public static List<int> bitScan(ulong bitboard) {
        var indices = new List<int>(30);
        const ulong deBruijn64 = 0x03f79d71b4cb0a89UL;

        while (bitboard != 0) {
            indices.Add(index64[((bitboard ^ (bitboard - 1)) * deBruijn64) >> 58]);
            bitboard &= bitboard - 1;
        }
        return indices;
    }

This is the method that is called the most, and I want to speed it up. Is there a faster way to do this? I want to return an array instead of a list, but I can't figure out how since the number of bits is unknown (and I don't want empty elements since I have lots of foreach loops).

Any advice is appreciated.

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Have you tried using Visual Studios performance analyzer? Might give you a better clue as to what part of you program is causing the slowdown. –  Dave3of5 Jul 17 '14 at 8:39
    
possible duplicate of Get an array of the bit positions within a 64-bit integer –  AnthonyLambert Jul 17 '14 at 8:43
    
This is the same home work as stackoverflow.com/questions/14086854/… –  AnthonyLambert Jul 17 '14 at 8:43

1 Answer 1

I would say that the List<T> is the biggest performance thief. How does this work compared to your own implementation?:

public static readonly byte[] index64 = {
         0, 47,  1, 56, 48, 27,  2, 60,
         57, 49, 41, 37, 28, 16,  3, 61,
         54, 58, 35, 52, 50, 42, 21, 44,
         38, 32, 29, 23, 17, 11,  4, 62,
         46, 55, 26, 59, 40, 36, 15, 53,
         34, 51, 20, 43, 31, 22, 10, 45,
         25, 39, 14, 33, 19, 30,  9, 24,
         13, 18,  8, 12,  7,  6,  5, 63
    };

private static const ulong deBruijn64 = 0x03f79d71b4cb0a89UL; // Do not initialize many times
public static byte[] bitScan(ulong bitboard) {
  // Should never be more than that right, queen can hit maximum 28 squares?
  var indices = new byte[28]; 
  var index = 0;
  while (bitboard != 0) {
    indices[index++] = index64[((bitboard ^ (bitboard - 1)) * deBruijn64) >> 58];
    bitboard &= bitboard - 1;
  }
  return indices;
}

When using it outside of the method, just don't care about the 0's in the array.

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