Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does array_diff() work? It obviously couldn't work as follows:

function array_diff($arraya, $arrayb)
{
    $diffs = array();
    foreach ($arraya as $keya => $valuea)
    {
        $equaltag = 0;
        foreach ($arrayb as $valueb)     
        {
            if ($valuea == $valueb)
            {
                $equaltag =1;
                break;
            }
        }
        if ($equaltag == o)
        {
              $diffs[$keya]=$valuea;
        }

    }
    return $diffs;                          
}                                  //couldn't be worse than this

Does anyone know a better solution?

EDIT @animuson:

function array_diff($arraya, $arrayb)
{
    foreach ($arraya as $keya => $valuea)
    {
        if (in_array($valuea, $arrayb))
        {
            unset($arraya[$keya]);
        }
    }
    return $arraya;
}
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

UPDATE

  • see below for faster/better code.

  • array_diff behaviour is much better in php 5.3.4, but still ~10 times slower than Leo's function.

  • also it's worth noting that these functions are not strictly equivalent to array_diff since they don't maintain array keys, i.e. my_array_diff(x,y) == array_values(array_diff(x,y)).

/UPDATE

A better solution is to use hash maps

function my_array_diff($a, $b) {
    $map = $out = array();
    foreach($a as $val) $map[$val] = 1;
    foreach($b as $val) if(isset($map[$val])) $map[$val] = 0;
    foreach($map as $val => $ok) if($ok) $out[] = $val;
    return $out;
}

$a = array('A', 'B', 'C', 'D');
$b = array('X', 'C', 'A', 'Y');

print_r(my_array_diff($a, $b)); // B, D

benchmark

function your_array_diff($arraya, $arrayb)
{
    foreach ($arraya as $keya => $valuea)
    {
        if (in_array($valuea, $arrayb))
        {
            unset($arraya[$keya]);
        }
    }
    return $arraya;
}

$a = range(1, 10000);
$b = range(5000, 15000);

shuffle($a);
shuffle($b);

$ts = microtime(true);
my_array_diff($a, $b);
printf("ME =%.4f\n", microtime(true) - $ts);

$ts = microtime(true);
your_array_diff($a, $b);
printf("YOU=%.4f\n", microtime(true) - $ts);

result

ME =0.0137
YOU=3.6282

any questions? ;)

and, just for fun,

$ts = microtime(true);
array_diff($a, $b);
printf("PHP=%.4f\n", microtime(true) - $ts);

result

ME =0.0140
YOU=3.6706
PHP=19.5980

that's incredible!

share|improve this answer
    
Good job.But I think my edit version would be faster:) –  Young Mar 19 '10 at 19:50
1  
see update..... –  user187291 Mar 19 '10 at 20:04
    
OOPS!!That's really incredible! –  Young Mar 20 '10 at 0:19
    
+1. I'm surprised that this is even faster, although unlike array_diff, index association is lost: array_keys(array_diff_key(array_fill_keys($a, 1), array_fill_keys($b, 1))) –  goat Mar 20 '10 at 15:37

user187291's suggestion to do it in PHP via hash tables is simply great! In a rush of adrenaline taken from this phantastic idea, I even found a way to speed it up a little more (PHP 5.3.1):

function leo_array_diff($a, $b) {
    $map = $out = array();
    foreach($a as $val) $map[$val] = 1;
    foreach($b as $val) unset($map[$val]);
    return array_keys($map);
}

With the benchmark taken from user187291's posting:

LEO=0.0322  leo_array_diff()
ME =0.1308  my_array_diff()
YOU=4.5051  your_array_diff()
PHP=45.7114 array_diff()

The array_diff() performance lag is evident even at 100 entries per array.

Note: This solution implies that the elements in the first array are unique (or they will become unique). This is typical for a hash solution.

Note: The solution does not preserve indices. Assign the original index to $map and finally use array_flip() to preserve keys.

PS: I found this while looking for some array_diff() paradoxon: array_diff() took three times longer for practically the same task if used twice in the script.

share|improve this answer

The best solution to know how it works it to take a look at its source-code ;-)
(Well, that's one of the powers of open source -- and if you see some possible optimization, you can submit a patch ;-) )

For array_diff, it should be in ext/standard -- which means, for PHP 5.3, it should be there : branches/PHP_5_3/ext/standard

And, then, the array.c file looks like a plausible target ; the php_array_diff function, line 3381, seems to correspond to array_diff.


(Good luck going through the code : it's quite long...)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm too tired now:( –  Young Mar 19 '10 at 19:26
    
Yeah, that's the kind of situations in which I think I should not have stopped using C... But, in the same have, have no regret ^^ –  Pascal MARTIN Mar 19 '10 at 19:28

As this has been brought up (see @BurninLeo's answer), what about something like this?

function binary_array_diff($a, $b) {
    $result = $a;
    asort($a);
    asort($b);
    list($bKey, $bVal) = each($b);
    foreach ( $a as $aKey => $aVal ) {
        while ( $aVal > $bVal ) {
            list($bKey, $bVal) = each($b);
        }
        if ( $aVal === $bVal ) {
            unset($result[$aKey]);
        }
    }
    return $result;
}

After performing some tests, results seem to be acceptable:

$a = range(1, 10000);
$b = range(5000, 15000);

shuffle($a);
shuffle($b);

$ts = microtime(true);
for ( $n = 0; $n < 10; ++$n ) {
    array_diff($a, $b);
}
printf("PHP    => %.4f\n", microtime(true) - $ts);

$ts = microtime(true);
for ( $n = 0; $n < 10; ++$n ) {
    binary_array_diff($a, $b);
}
printf("binary => %.4f\n", microtime(true) - $ts);

$binaryResult = binary_array_diff($a, $b);
$phpResult    = array_diff($a, $b);
if ( $binaryResult == $phpResult && array_keys($binaryResult) == array_keys($phpResult) ) {
    echo "returned arrays are the same\n";
}

Output:

PHP    => 1.3018
binary => 1.3601
returned arrays are the same

Of course, PHP code cannot perform as good as C code, therefore there's no wonder that PHP code is a bit slower.

share|improve this answer

It seems you can speed it up a good deal more by using another array instead of unsetting. Though, this uses more memory, which might be an issue depeding on the use-case (I haven't tested actual differences in memory allocation).

<?php
function my_array_diff($a, $b) {
  $map = $out = array();
  foreach($a as $val) $map[$val] = 1;
  foreach($b as $val) if(isset($map[$val])) $map[$val] = 0;
  foreach($map as $val => $ok) if($ok) $out[] = $val;
  return $out;
}
function leo_array_diff($a, $b) {
  $map = $out = array();
  foreach($a as $val) $map[$val] = 1;
  foreach($b as $val) unset($map[$val]);
  return array_keys($map);
}
function flip_array_diff_key($b, $a) {
  $at = array_flip($a);
  $bt = array_flip($b);
  $d = array_diff_key($bt, $at);
  return array_keys($d);
}
function flip_isset_diff($b, $a) {
  $at = array_flip($a);
  $d = array();
  foreach ($b as $i)
    if (!isset($at[$i]))
      $d[] = $i;
  return $d;
}
function large_array_diff($b, $a) {
  $at = array();
  foreach ($a as $i)
    $at[$i] = 1;
  $d = array();
  foreach ($b as $i)
    if (!isset($at[$i]))
      $d[] = $i;
  return $d;
}

$functions = array("flip_array_diff_key", "flip_isset_diff", "large_array_diff", "leo_array_diff", "my_array_diff", "array_diff");
#$functions = array_reverse($functions);
$l = range(1, 1000000);
$l2 = range(1, 1000000, 2);

foreach ($functions as $function) {
  $ts = microtime(true);
  for ($i = 0; $i < 10; $i++) {
    $f = $function($l, $l2);
  }
  $te = microtime(true);
  $timing[$function] = $te - $ts;
}
asort($timing);
print_r($timing);

My timings are (PHP 5.3.27-1~dotdeb.0):

[flip_isset_diff] => 3.7415699958801
[flip_array_diff_key] => 4.2989008426666
[large_array_diff] => 4.7882599830627
[flip_flip_isset_diff] => 5.0816700458527
[leo_array_diff] => 11.086831092834
[my_array_diff] => 14.563184976578
[array_diff] => 99.379411935806

The three new functions were found at http://shiplu.mokadd.im/topics/performance-optimization/

share|improve this answer

From PHP: "Returns an array containing all the entries from array1 that are not present in any of the other arrays."

So, you just check array1 against all arrayN and any values in array1 that don't appear in any of those arrays will be returned in a new array.

You don't necessarily even need to loop through all of array1's values. Just for all the additional arrays, loop through their values and check if each value is in_array($array1, $value).

share|improve this answer
    
-1 It is more complex than that. There are advanced algorithms and data structures being used. See pascal's answer. –  Byron Whitlock Mar 19 '10 at 19:26
    
It is still a basic idea of what is happening and is a better solution than what he had. –  animuson Mar 19 '10 at 19:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.