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Far as best practices are concerned, which is better:

public void SomeMethod(string str) 
{
    if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("str cannot be null or empty.");
    }

    // do other stuff
}

or

public void SomeMethod(string str) 
{
    if(str == null) 
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("str");
    }

    if(str == string.Empty)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("str cannot be empty.");
    }

    // do other stuff
}

The second version seems more precise, but also more cumbersome than the first. I usually go with #1, but figured I'd check if there's an argument to be made for #2.

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Possible duplicate? There they also suggest another option: a custom StringNullOrEmptyException. –  Matthijs Wessels Jan 25 '13 at 16:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

I'd say the second way is indeed more precise - yes, it's more cumbersome but you can always wrap it in a method to avoid having to do it all the time. It could even be an extension method:

str.ThrowIfNullOrEmpty("str");


public static void ThrowIfNullOrEmpty(this string value, string name)
{
    if (value == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException(name);
    }
    if (value == "")
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Argument must not be the empty string.",
                                    name);
    }
}

Another form which is potentially useful is one which returns the original string if everything is okay. You could write something like this:

public Person(string name)
{
    this.name = name.CheckNotEmpty();
}

Another option to consider is using Code Contracts as an alternative to throwing your own exceptions.

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I would suggest using the first one. If your method doesn't expects null or empty string it really doesn't matter if null or empty was passed - important to report and error and that is what 1st variant does.

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"If your method doesn't expects null or empty string it really doesn't matter if null or empty was passed" +1 as this is pretty much exactly what I was thinking. –  heisenberg Mar 19 '10 at 21:02
1  
I agree with this answer, although @JonSkeet's answer is more precise, pragmatically, throwing either ArgumentNullException or ArgumentException doesn't make a huge difference from the perspective of the caller. Passing ArgumentNullException doesn't give you any more information than ArgumentException in terms of what's required to fix the problem. –  Matthew Aug 13 '13 at 22:03

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