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I need to round times down to the nearest quarter hour in PHP. The times are being pulled from a MySQL database from a datetime column and formatted like 2010-03-18 10:50:00.

Example:

  • 10:50 needs to be 10:45
  • 1:12 needs to be 1:00
  • 3:28 needs to be 3:15
  • etc.

I'm assuming floor() is involved but not sure how to go about it.

Thanks

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5  
If you were rounding to the nearest quarter hour wouldn't 1:12 become 1:15 and 3:28 become 3:30? Rather, aren't you rounding down to the quarter hour? The former is a little more challenging than the latter... –  Richard JP Le Guen Mar 19 '10 at 21:18
    
Sorry, yes that was the goal. Rounding DOWN to the nearest quarter hour. –  Rob Mar 23 '10 at 20:31

10 Answers 10

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Your full function would be something like this...

function roundToQuarterHour($timestring) {
    $minutes = date('i', strtotime($timestring));
    return $minutes - ($minutes % 15);
}
share|improve this answer
    
removed the function and went this route: $start_minutes = date('i', strtotime($row['start'])); $minutes_floor = $start_minutes - ($start_minutes % 15); –  Rob Mar 23 '10 at 20:32
2  
if $minutes = 29 it will return 15 - must return 30 –  FDisk Feb 7 '12 at 10:40
$seconds = time();
$rounded_seconds = round($seconds / (15 * 60)) * (15 * 60);

echo "Original: " . date('H:i', $seconds) . "\n";
echo "Rounded: " . date('H:i', $rounded_seconds) . "\n";

This example gets the current time and rounds it to the nearest quarter and prints both the original and the rounded time.

PS: If you want to round it down replace round() with floor().

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect solution –  FDisk Feb 7 '12 at 10:48
    
You can supplement ceil()/floor() for round() if you want to force your time up/down, respectively. –  zmonteca Jul 11 '13 at 22:51
$now = getdate();
$minutes = $now['minutes'] - $now['minutes']%15;

 //Can add this to go to the nearest 15min interval (up or down)
  $rmin  = $now['minutes']%15;
  if ($rmin > 7){
    $minutes = $now['minutes'] + (15-$rmin);
   }else{
      $minutes = $now['minutes'] - $rmin;
  }

$rounded = $now['hours'].":".$minutes;
echo $rounded;
share|improve this answer
    
I found that if the time is something like 10:59 it's rounded to 10:60. To solve this I added: if ($minutes == "60") { $rounded = $date_split['hour']+1; $rounded .= ":00"; } else { $minutes = str_pad($minutes, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT); $rounded = $date_split['hour'].":".$minutes; } also str_pad to ensure the leading zero everywhere. This solution might be optimal but works fine. –  TCB13 May 1 '12 at 22:10

Lately I like tackling a problem the TDD/unit testing way. I am not programming much PHP anymore lately, but this is what I came up with. To be honest I actually looked at the code examples here, and picked the one I thought was already correct. Next I wanted to verify this by unit testing using the tests you provided above.

class TimeTest

require_once 'PHPUnit/Framework.php';
require_once 'Time.php';

class TimeTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase 
{
    protected $time;

    protected function setUp() {
        $this->time = new Time(10, 50);
    }

    public function testConstructingTime() {
        $this->assertEquals("10:50", $this->time->getTime());
        $this->assertEquals("10", $this->time->getHours());
        $this->assertEquals("50", $this->time->getMinutes());        
    }

    public function testCreatingTimeFromString() {
        $myTime = Time::create("10:50");
        $this->assertEquals("10", $myTime->getHours());
        $this->assertEquals("50", $myTime->getMinutes());
    }

    public function testComparingTimes() {
        $timeEquals     = new Time(10, 50);
        $this->assertTrue($this->time->equals($timeEquals));
        $timeNotEquals  = new Time(10, 44);
        $this->assertFalse($this->time->equals($timeNotEquals));
    }


    public function testRoundingTimes()
    {
        // Round test time.
        $roundedTime = $this->time->round();
        $this->assertEquals("10", $roundedTime->getHours());
        $this->assertEquals("45", $roundedTime->getMinutes());

        // Test some more times.
        $timesToTest = array(
            array(new Time(1,00), new Time(1,12)),
            array(new Time(3,15), new Time(3,28)),
            array(new Time(1,00), new Time(1,12)),
        );

        foreach($timesToTest as $timeToTest) {
            $this->assertTrue($timeToTest[0]->equals($timeToTest[0]->round()));
        }        
    }
}

class Time

<?php

class Time
{
    private $hours;
    private $minutes;

    public static function create($timestr) {
        $hours      = date('g', strtotime($timestr));
        $minutes    = date('i', strtotime($timestr));
        return new Time($hours, $minutes);
    }

    public function __construct($hours, $minutes) {
        $this->hours    = $hours;
        $this->minutes  = $minutes;
    }

    public function equals(Time $time) {
        return  $this->hours == $time->getHours() &&
                 $this->minutes == $time->getMinutes();
    }

    public function round() {
        $roundedMinutes = $this->minutes - ($this->minutes % 15);
        return new Time($this->hours, $roundedMinutes);
    }

    public function getTime() {
        return $this->hours . ":" . $this->minutes;
    }

    public function getHours() {
        return $this->hours;
    }

    public function getMinutes() {
        return $this->minutes;
    }
}

Running Test

alfred@alfred-laptop:~/htdocs/time$ phpunit TimeTest.php 
PHPUnit 3.3.17 by Sebastian Bergmann.

....

Time: 0 seconds

OK (4 tests, 12 assertions)
share|improve this answer
$minutes = ($minutes - ($minutes % 15));
share|improve this answer
    
So 1:19 becomes (19%15)*15 = 4*15 = 60!? –  Richard JP Le Guen Mar 19 '10 at 21:20
    
Thanks Richard. My head is somewhere else. –  Scott Saunders Mar 19 '10 at 21:22
1  
not %!!! you need floor!!!:) –  Syom Mar 19 '10 at 22:38
1  
@Syom try executing the code, it works. –  Andy Mar 19 '10 at 23:36

To round nearest quarter hour use below code

<?php
$time = strtotime("01:08");
echo $time.'<br />';
$round = 15*60;
$rounded = round($time / $round) * $round;
echo date("H:i", $rounded);
?>

01:08 become 01:15

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Calculations happen much more precise with your example, rather than with an example in accepted answer, thanks! –  Ilia Rostovtsev Dec 6 '13 at 16:57

For my system I wanted to add jobs which are scheduled to run every 5th minute on my server, and I want the same job to run in the next 5th minute block, then 15, 30, 60, 120, 240 minutes, 1 day and 2 days after, so that's what this function calculates

function calculateJobTimes() {
    $now = time();
    IF($now %300) {
        $lastTime = $now - ($now % 300);
    }
    ELSE {
        $lastTime = $now;
    }
    $next[] = $lastTime + 300;
    $next[] = $lastTime + 900;
    $next[] = $lastTime + 1800;
    $next[] = $lastTime + 3600;
    $next[] = $lastTime + 7200;
    $next[] = $lastTime + 14400;
    $next[] = $lastTime + 86400;
    $next[] = $lastTime + 172800;
    return $next;
}

echo "The time now is ".date("Y-m-d H:i:s")."<br />
Jobs will be scheduled to run at the following times:<br /><br />
<ul>";
foreach(calculateJobTimes() as $jTime) {
    echo "<li>".date("Y-m-d H:i:s", $jTime).'</li>';
}
echo '</ul>';
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I needed a way to round down to the day, and cut off everything beyond that:

$explodedDate = explode("T", gmdate("c",strtotime("now")));
$expireNowDate =  date_create($explodedDate[0]);

The strtotime gives me a timestamp for "now", which gmdate converts to ISO format (something like "2012-06-05T04:00:00+00:00"), then I use explode at the "T", giving me "2012-06-05" in the zeroth index of $explodedDate, which is then passed into date_create to get a date object.

Not sure if all of that is necessary, but it seems like a lot less work than going through and subtracting the seconds, minutes, hours etc.

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Or this could be easier. $expireNowDate = date_create(date("Y-m-d")); –  Andy Gee Oct 30 '12 at 8:13

I wrote a function that does the trick to round time stamps to seconds or minutes.

I might not be the most performant way, but I think PHP doens't care about a few simple loops.

In your case, you just pass your MySQL datetime like this:

<?php echo date('d/m/Y - H:i:s', roundTime(strtotime($MysqlDateTime), 'i', 15)); ?>

Returns: the closests rounded value (looks both up and down!)

The function:

<?php
function roundTime($time, $entity = 'i', $value = 15){

    // prevent big loops
    if(strpos('is', $entity) === false){
        return $time;
    }

    // up down counters
    $loopsUp = $loopsDown = 0;

    // loop up
    $loop = $time;
    while(date($entity, $loop) % $value != 0){
        $loopsUp++;
        $loop++;
    }
    $return = $loop;    


    // loop down
    $loop = $time;
    while(date($entity, $loop) % $value != 0){
        $loopsDown++;
        $loop--;
        if($loopsDown > $loopsUp){
            $loop = $return;
            break;  
        }
    }
    $return = $loop;

    // round seconds down
    if($entity == 'i' && date('s', $return) != 0){
        while(intval(date('s', $return)) != 0){
            $return--;
        }
    }
    return $return;
}
?>

You simple replace $entity by 's' if you want to round up or down to seconds and replace 15 by the amount of seconds or minutes you want to roud up or down to.

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Here's a function I'm currently using:

/**
 * Rounds a timestamp
 *
 * @param int $input current timestamp
 * @param int $round_to_minutes rounds to this minute
 * @param string $type auto, ceil, floor
 * @return int rounded timestamp
 */
static function roundToClosestMinute($input = 0, $round_to_minutes = 5, $type = 'auto')
{
    $now = !$input ? time() : (int)$input;

    $seconds = $round_to_minutes * 60;
    $floored = $seconds * floor($now / $seconds);
    $ceiled = $seconds * ceil($now / $seconds);

    switch ($type) {
        default:
            $rounded = ($now - $floored < $ceiled - $now) ? $floored : $ceiled;
            break;

        case 'ceil':
            $rounded = $ceiled;
            break;

        case 'floor':
            $rounded = $floored;
            break;
    }

    return $rounded ? $rounded : $input;
}

Hope it helps someone :)

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