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I have a driver that has both x86 and x64 bit drivers. The installer checks for Is64BitOS && Is64BitProcess. If it is a true then it grabs my x64 drivers and does something a bit strange to me. it would disable DisableWow64FSRedirection, copy the x64 driver to c:\windows\system32\drivers, then RevertWow64FSRedirection

that seems wrong to me. oh and after it gets done copying said file it creates a Kernel service. I'm not sure why the installer would do it, or even if it should. When I look into my registry (out of curiosity I installed both of them on my x64 machine) at HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\driver64 the Image path is \??\C:\Windows\System32\drivers\driver64.sys

but when I look at HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\driver86 the ImagePath is just simply driver86 not even a sys extension... although I do see a WOW64 flag that the other one doesn't have... interesting.

Long story short. I don't like that. If Microsoft decided to put in redirection then I'm also sure that when I create a SafeFileHandle to said driver that it would redirect to the correct driver. Am I being crazy?

I made the installer in C#. and for reference here is the installing bit of code

    private static void InstallDriver()
    {
        string name = GetCorrectDriverName();
        byte[] driver = is64Bit ? Properties.Resources.inpoutx64 : Properties.Resources.inpout32;
        string path = Kernel32.CopyDriverToSystem32(is64Bit, name, driver);
        ServiceInstaller.InstallAndStart(name, name, path);
    }

Kernel32.cs

    /// <summary>
    /// Copies a driver with a specific name to the System32\Driver folder
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="is64Bit">Value to determine if system is 32 or 64 bit. SYSTEM not program</param>
    /// <param name="driverName">the name of the driver. file extension and path will be added to this, so just the name</param>
    /// <param name="driver">the driver itself. In this case it is an embedded resource.</param>
    /// <returns>the full path name of the driver that was intalled.</returns>
    public static string CopyDriverToSystem32(bool is64Bit, string driverName, byte[] driver)
    {
        bool oldValue = false;
        if (is64Bit) DisableWow64FSRedirection(out oldValue);
        string path = Path.Combine(Environment.SystemDirectory, "drivers");
        path = Path.Combine(path,  driverName + ".sys");
        File.WriteAllBytes(path, driver);
        if (is64Bit) RevertWow64FSRedirection(oldValue);
        return path;
    } 

ServiceInstaller.cs

    public static void InstallAndStart(string serviceName, string displayName, string fileName)
    {
        IntPtr scm = OpenSCManager(ScmAccessRights.AllAccess);

        try
        {
            IntPtr service = OpenService(scm, serviceName, ServiceAccessRights.AllAccess);

            if (service == IntPtr.Zero)
            {
                service = CreateService(scm, serviceName, displayName, ServiceAccessRights.AllAccess, SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER, ServiceBootFlag.AutoStart, ServiceError.Normal, fileName, null, IntPtr.Zero, null, null, null);
            }
            if (service == IntPtr.Zero)
                throw new ApplicationException("Failed to install service.");

            try
            {
                StartService(service);
            }
            finally
            {
                CloseServiceHandle(service);
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            CloseServiceHandle(scm);
        }
    }
    private static IntPtr OpenSCManager(ScmAccessRights rights)
    {
        IntPtr scm = OpenSCManager(null, null, rights);
        if (scm == IntPtr.Zero)
            throw new ApplicationException("Could not connect to service control manager.");

        return scm;
    }

after it is done installing using it is super simple, and that is what i hope to keep.

        string driverName = GetCorrectDriverName();
        try
        {
            var driverHandle = Kernel32.CreateExclusiveRWFile(driverName);
        }
        catch (System.IO.FileNotFoundException)
        {
            InstallDriver();
        }
share|improve this question
1  
IMO that code should not disable FS redirection. Rather, it should copy to the sysnative folder instead, which is a special alias for non-redirected system32 on a 64-bit system. –  Dark Falcon Jul 17 '14 at 14:38
    
@DarkFalcon i'm apposed to doing that, in the end I just need it to work. Is deleting the entry in my registry the same as stopping the service? –  Robert Snyder Jul 17 '14 at 14:42
    
No it is not. The SCM will not be aware of the change. If it is currently loaded, it won't be unloaded either. –  Dark Falcon Jul 17 '14 at 14:43
    
@DarkFalcon ok that is what I thought. The code I found for the Service Installer I believe has a uninstall. How come Kernel Drivers aren't in the GUI services.msc? Is there somewhere I can see them? –  Robert Snyder Jul 17 '14 at 14:47

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