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Who is responsible for error checking and handling?

I don't have any of the expensive component libraries such as DevExpress or TMS Components etc so I cannot look at source to get an idea of how most components manage error handling.

Specifically what I am wanting to know is should there be a limit to how many errors and warnings component developers should try to capture? Is there a balance between having meaningful error checking and just making it too easy for developers using your component?


Here is an example using a few scenarios:

Note these are directly from the components source (made up for example purposes)

procedure TMyComponent.AddFromFile(FileName: string);
begin
  FBitmap.LoadFromFile(FileName);
end;

or

procedure TMyComponent.AddFromFile(FileName: string);
begin
  if FileExists(FileName) then
  begin
    FBitmap.LoadFromFile(FileName);
  end
  else
    raise Exception.Create(FileName + ' does not exist.');
end;

And these last two are using an instance of the component at runtime:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  MyComponent1.AddFromFile('D:\Test.bmp');
end;

or

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if FileExists('D:\Test.bmp') then
  begin
    MyComponent1.AddFromFile('D:\Test.bmp');
  end
  else
    raise Exception.Create('D:\Test.bmp does not exist.');
end;

I guess it comes down to who should error check and handle what? Is the component developer responsible for handling these types of checking or the user of the component?

As I am writing this I believe both component developer and user should handle such checking but I am unsure, so I am looking for what the general consensus amongst developers is.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Raising some sort of EMyException e.g. having also error code would make better sense in this case. But anyway, there's so many possible errors that may occur just in this particular example that I wouldn't bother with that. I would just mention in documentation for the user that they must provide an existing file in proper size and format and let exceptions flow. – TLama Jul 17 '14 at 14:45

To answer your specific queestion:

Specifically what I am wanting to know is should there be a limit to how many errors and warnings component developers should try to capture? Is there a balance between having meaningful error checking and just making it too easy for developers using your component?

The general rule about exception handling is that you should only catch exceptions you know how to handle, and let others propagate to higher code that may know how to handle it. If an exception is raised inside of your component, the component needs to decide whether to:

  1. handle that particular exception internally and gracefully move on to other things without notifying the caller at all.

  2. re-throw the exception (maybe with tweaks made to it), or re-throw a whole new exception, to allow the caller to identify and handle that specific failure, if desired.

  3. ignore the exception (don't catch it at all) and just let it propagate as-is.

If an API used by your component returns an error code instead of raising an exception, the component needs to decide how to handle that as well. Whether to ignore the error and move on, or raise an exception to make it more apparent.

In your particular example, I prefer the following approach:

type
  EMyComponentAddError = class(Exception)
  private
    FFileName: String;
  begin
    constructor CreateWithFileName(const AFileName: string);
    property FileName: string read FFileName;
  end;

constructor EMyComponentAddError.CreateWithFileName(const AFileName: string);
begin
  inherited CreateFmt('Unable to add file: %s', [AFileName]);
  FFileName := AFileName;
end;

procedure TMyComponent.AddFromFile(FileName: string);
begin
  try
    FBitmap.LoadFromFile(FileName);
  except
    Exception.RaiseOuterException(EMyComponentAddError.CreateWithFileName(FileName));
  end;
end;

This allows your component to recognize that an error occurred, act on it as needed, and still report component-specific information to the caller without losing the original error that caused the actual failure. If the caller is interested in the details, it can catch the exception, look at its InnerException property, access custom properties if present, etc.

For example:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  MyComponent1.AddFromFile('D:\Test.bmp');
end;

Let's assume MyComponent1.AddFromFile('D:\Test.bmp'); fails. The default exception handler will catch it and display a popup message that says:

Unable to add file: D:\Test.bmp

Useful, but little details, as it could have failed for any number of reasons. Maybe the file could not be opened, but why? Non-existant vs no permission? Maybe the file was opened but corrupted? Maybe memory could not be allocated? And so on.

The caller could catch it and display more useful info, if so desired (it is not required - the component provides the info, the caller decides whether to use it or not):

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  try
    MyComponent1.AddFromFile('D:\Test.bmp');
  except
    on E: EMyComponentAddError do
    begin
     ShowMessage('There was a problem adding a file:'+sLineBreak+E.FileName+sLineBreak+sLineBreak+E.InnerException.Message);
     Sysutils.Abort;
    end;
  end;
end;

Or:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  try
    MyComponent1.AddFromFile('D:\Test.bmp');
  except
    on E: EMyComponentAddError do
    begin
      raise Exception.CreateFmt('There was a problem adding a file:'#10'%s'#10#10'%s', [E.FileName, E.InnerException.Message]);
    end;
  end;
end;

Either of which would display:

There was a problem adding a file:
D:\Test.bmp
The file was not found
share|improve this answer
1  
That's an epic amount of boilerplate. You'd end up adding that try/except block in every public method of the component. I've never seen code like that before. I'm pretty sure that it's not the norm in the VCL. Does Indy do that? – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 16:14
    
You would have to catch it only if you want to handle it, otherwise let the default handler catch it like any other exception. Most components report errors using exceptions. And yes, Indy uses custom exceptions with extra properties for error codes/text all over the place (but does not utilize `RaiseOuterException() yet). I use this technique in other projects, though. – Remy Lebeau Jul 17 '14 at 16:17
1  
I read your answer as suggesting that exceptions should always be caught and re-raised. But what you say in the comment indicates that the answer is just meant to illustrate a neat way to re-raise exceptions. I think the asker is really looking for guidance as to whether or not to catch and re-raise. – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 16:19
    
That is one of the benefits of raising a new exception type. It is a specific error for a specific action. The caller can choose how to handle it. Just ignore it like any other general exception? Catch it, act/report on it, and re-raise it to higher code as a fatal error? Catch it, act/report on it, and discard it as non-fatal? The point it, the component does not enforce how the error is handled, the caller decides based on its own needs, but it is specific enough that the caller can isolate it without having to worry about handling other types of errors if not needed. – Remy Lebeau Jul 17 '14 at 16:33
2  
Because @Sir Rufo is, in my opinion, addressing the question that was asked. The question is, in my opinion, asking about design rather than implementation. The asker wants to know which approach to use and why. In chess terms, the question is about strategy, and your answer discusses tactics. What's more, your answer appears to advocate catch all exception handling, so-called Pokemon exception handling. – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 17:14

As David said we only need this

procedure TMyComponent.AddFromFile(FileName: string);
begin
  FBitmap.LoadFromFile(FileName);
end;

This will check that

  • there is an existing file
  • in this file is a valid bitmap

Now it depends on the application, how important is this for the application. If this TForm1 is the Application.MainForm, every exception you did not catch inside the creation process will terminate the application. This is sometimes a valid behavior.

  1. Very important, the application cannot run without

    procedure TForm1.Form1Create(Sender:TObject);
    begin
      MyComponent.AddFromFile( 'D:\Test.bmp' );
    end;
    

    or wrap the exception for a user-friendly message

    procedure TForm1.Form1Create(Sender:TObject);
    begin
      try
        MyComponent.AddFromFile( 'D:\Test.bmp' );
      except
        on E: Exception do
          raise Exception.Create( 'Sorry, I cannot run, because of: ' + E.Message );
      end;
    end;
    
  2. Very important, but we have a fallback to handle this, maybe

    procedure TForm1.Form1Create(Sender:TObject);
    var
      LBitmapFiles : TStringList;
      LBitmapIdx : Integer;
      LBitmapLoaded : Boolean;
      LErrorStore : TStringList;
    begin
      LBitmapFiles := nil;
      LErrorStore := nil;
      try
        LBitmapFiles := TStringList.Create;
        LErrorStore := TStringList.Create;
    
        LBitmapFiles.Add( 'D:\Test.bmp' );
        LBitmapFiles.Add( 'D:\Fallback.bmp' );
    
        LBitmapLoaded := False;
        while not LBitmapLoaded and ( LBitmapIdx < LBitmapFiles.Count ) do
          try
            MyComponent.AddFromFile( LBitmapFiles[LBitmapIdx] );
            LBitmapLoaded := True;
          except
            on E: Exception do
            begin
              LErrorStore.Add( LBitmapFiles[LBitmapIdx] + ': ' + E.Message );
              Inc( LBitmapIdx );
            end;
          end;
    
        if not LBitmapLoaded then
          raise Exception.Create( 'Sorry, I cannot run, because of: ' + LErrorStore.Text );
      finally
        LErrorStore.Free;
        LBitmapFiles.Free;
      end;
    end;
    

    There are other fallbacks possible and this also depends on the application (f.i. set a dummy bitmap to the component) to get the application to work properly.

  3. Not important, if we have no image ... we have no image, who cares

    procedure TForm1.Form1Create(Sender:TObject);
    const
      CBitmapFile = 'D:\Test.bmp';
    begin
      // check, if there is a file
      if FileExists( CBitmapFile ) then
        try
          MyComponent.AddFromFile( CBitmapFile );
        except
          on E: Exception do
          begin
            // Maybe log the exception
            SomeLogger.Log( E );
            // Maybe set some extra parameters for the application to know, this has failed
            RunningWithoutBitmap();
          end;
        end
      else
        // Maybe set some extra parameters for the application to know, this has failed
        RunningWithoutBitmap();
    end;
    
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like the way you wrote this – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 16:48
2  
@DavidHeffernan: Why are you congratulating this answer, and shunning my answer? They allow the same thing - let the caller decide how to handle an error from the component. My answer provides for the caller to do targetted error handling if desired, whereas this answer is not looking at the specific exception types at all, all errors are treated the same way. – Remy Lebeau Jul 17 '14 at 17:08
    
@RemyLebeau Conversation moved to your answer where it belongs – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 17:16

Component

procedure TMyComponent.AddFromFile(FileName: string);
begin
  FBitmap.LoadFromFile(FileName);
end;

This is all you need. If the bitmap object cannot load the file, for whatever reason, it will raise an exception. Let that exception propagate to the consumer of the code.

There's really no point trying to test whether or not the file exists. What if the file exists and it is not a bitmap file? What if the file exists, is a bitmap file, but the disk has a duff sector and the file read fails? If you attempt to check for all error conditions, you will just be repeating the checks that the LoadFromFile method already does.

Some error conditions cannot possibly be checked from the outside. An error that only becomes apparent part way through reading the file cannot reasonably be checked from the outside.

One very common consequence of over-zealous, duplicate error checking is that you end up with code that produces errors in scenarios where there should be none. If you get your error checking wrong you could end up reporting an error that would not have occurred had you let the underlying code run.

Consumer

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  MyComponent1.AddFromFile('D:\Test.bmp');
end;

At this point the decision is more difficult. I would typically expect the following question to be the driver of the decision:

Is it an expected, and reasonable event, for the file not to be present?

If the answer to that question is yes, then you should consider handling the exception in the FormCreate method. Again, testing FileExists() catches just one failure mode, albeit a common one. Perhaps you should use a try/except block to catch the error.

If the answer to the question is no, let the error propagate.

That said, you should also consider whether or not you want an exception to be thrown from your form's OnCreate event handler. That may be perfectly reasonable, but it is certainly conceivable that you will not wish to do this.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with you David, but i think in some situations you must check and handle the exception for the obvious mistakes and raise the others. Another observation is that at the front end I never raise an exception, for me raising exceptions should be a responsability of the librarys, frameworks or components. – Diego Garcia Jul 17 '14 at 14:51
    
@DiegoGarcia Application code certainly can and should raise exceptions, in the appropriate circumstances. – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 14:55
1  
@DiegoGarcia I do this, and use madExcept. If I want to raise an exception that I don't want to trigger a bug report, I raise on derived from a class that madExcept has been told to ignore. The problem with detecting an error and not raising an exception is that it can be hard to work your way back up the call stack without exceptions. Mixing exception based error handling with error code based error handling is a recipe for disaster. – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 15:14
1  
@DiegoGarcia I agree that not every error should be an exception. If it needs to be dealt with immediately then there need be no exception. If the code in question cannot deal with the error, then an exception is usually the right solution. – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 15:22
3  
@GeertGoeteyn Clearly you don't understand how exceptions work – David Heffernan Jul 17 '14 at 15:35

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