Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get many normal log lines in my google app engine application. But today I go these instead the 4-part number:

2a01:e35:2f20:f770:6c54:3ee8:67fb:df8

What is this for an format? ipv6 are 6 numbers, mac address too...

Normal logfile line:

187.14.44.208 - - [19/Mar/2010:14:31:35 -0700] "GET /geo_data.js HTTP/1.1" 200 776 "http://www.xxx.com.br/spl19/index.php?refid=gv_av_ri" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; pt-BR; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6 (.NET CLR 3.5.30729),gzip(gfe)"

This special logfile line:

2a01:e35:2f20:f770:6c54:3ee8:67fb:df8 - - [18/Mar/2010:17:00:37 -0700] "GET /geo_data.js HTTP/1.1" 500 450 "http://www.xxx.com.br/spl19/index.php?refid=cm_av_ri" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 6.1; pt-PT; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6,gzip(gfe)"
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That is IPv6. Your statement that IPv6 addresses have just 6 numbers is incorrect. Here's an IPv6 example next to your address:

2a01 : e35  : 2f20 : f770 : 6c54 : 3ee8 : 67fb : df8  // you
3ffe : 1900 : 4545 : 3    : 200  : f8ff : fe21 : 67cf // example

To the initiated (including me), IPv6 is very confusing.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand his confusion. When someone hears ipv6, their first thought is... 6 numbers. Which is incorrect, but confusing. –  Nathan Osman Mar 19 '10 at 21:41
    
@George-- agreed –  Michael Haren Mar 19 '10 at 21:44
    
Thanx for the fast answer - I supposed the IPv6 ip address but was irritated by the long number ... –  Christian Harms Mar 19 '10 at 21:56

This is IPv6.

IPv6 numbers are 128-bit numbers normally represented as 8 hex numbers separated by colons, with some abbreviation rules. See Wikipedia IPv6_address.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.