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I have a Clojure query that returns a row, and here is a partial printout of the returned row (map).

({:employer_percent 0.00M, ... :premium 621.44M, ...})

These two columns are decimal(5,2) and decimal(7,2) respectively in the mysql table.

Why is there an 'M' suffix at the end of each of these values? Here is the code that forms and executes the query.

    (def db {:classname "com.mysql.jdbc.Driver"
             :subprotocol "mysql"
             :subname "//system/app"
             :user "app-user"
             :password "pwrd"})

  (defn get-recent-gic-rows
  [search-date lt-toggle]
  (let [query (if (= 0 lt-toggle)
   (str "select g.* from gic_employees g where g.processed_date <= '" search-date "' order by g.processed_date desc limit 1  ")
   (str "select g.* from gic_employees g where g.processed_date <  '" search-date "' order by g.processed_date desc limit 1  "))]

        (j/query db
             [query])))
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

M suffix means that the number is BigDecimal. You can check this in REPL

user=> (class 1)
java.lang.Long
user=> (class 1.0)
java.lang.Double
user=> (class 1M)
java.math.BigDecimal

Since your database column type is decimal(5,2) and decimal(7,2), it's not safe to convert the numbers to float or double because those floating point type can't represent all the numbers of decimal(5,2) or decimal(7,2) accurately.

You can google with the keyword "floating point inaccuracy". There are tons of articles and Q&As, also within Stackoverflow.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for answering. I suppose I can convert that map key's value to a string and then pull the M off the end. –  octopusgrabbus Jul 18 '14 at 15:33
    
@octopusgrabbus Nothing prevents you from explicitly casting a BigDecimal to Double, e.g. via (double 1M) which will just produce 1.0 but for other values you might lose precision. If your goal is to print the value somewhere, just use clojure.core/format (or clojure.core/printf) with an appropriate format string, don't mess with the value itself. –  xsc Jul 19 '14 at 13:06

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