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I am new to matplotlib, so please pardon my ignorance and help me solve this problem. Essentially I have the following data being produced by other python scripts in a CSV file.

CSV1: Timestamp, data1

23:04:17, 1163557.14 bps
23:04:27, 1137578.47 bps
23:04:37, 1139094.66 bps
23:04:47, 1095752.97 bps
23:04:57, 1264145.01 bps

CSV2: Timestamp, data2

23:04:21, 1011000.00 bps
23:04:31, 1011000.00 bps
23:04:41, 1011000.00 bps
23:04:51, 1014000.00 bps
23:05:01, 1008000.00 bps

CSV3: Timestamp, data3

23:05:28, 1109617.96 bps
23:05:38, 1139177.95 bps
23:05:48, 1108110.09 bps
23:05:58, 1107078.94 bps
23:06:08, 1163406.80 bps

What I want is to have time run along the X-Axis and have the three Y values along the Y-Axis each showing "data1", "data2" and "data3" respectively. The data is collected every 10 seconds but they are not necessarily synchronized. So I cannot have a single array for X-Axis. But I want all of these in the same graph to compare them. How can I solve this problem ?

Any sample code or leads to documentation will be greatly appreciated.

**EDIT:

ESSENTIALLY MY QUESTION IS THAT THE DATA ARE INDEXED ALONG DIFFERENT TIMESTAMPS, BUT I WANT TO PLOT THEM ON THE SAME GRAPH. HOW CAN I DO THIS ?**

EDIT 2:

Thanks guys for the input. That really helped. So this is the code I have now:

    import csv
    import sys
    import datetime
    import random
    import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
    from matplotlib.dates import MinuteLocator, SecondLocator, DateFormatter

    time_e_z_raw_list = []
    bitrate_e_z_list = []
    time_i_z_raw_list = []
    bitrate_i_z_list = []
    time_i_query_z_raw_list = []
    bitrate_i_q_z_raw_list = []

    f_enc_z = open(sys.argv[1], 'rt')
    f_ing_z = open(sys.argv[2], 'rt')
    f_ing_q_z = open(sys.argv[3], 'rt')

    try:
        reader1 = csv.reader(f_enc_z)
        for row in reader1:
            bitrate = row[1]
            time_e_z_raw_list.append(row[0])
            bitrate_e_z_list.append(bitrate[:-4])
        reader3 = csv.reader(f_ing_z)
        for row in reader3:
            bitrate = row[1]
            time_i_z_raw_list.append(row[0])
            bitrate_i_z_list.append(bitrate[:-4])
        reader4 = csv.reader(f_ing_q_z)
        for row in reader4:
            bitrate = row[1]
            time_i_q_z_raw_list.append(row[0])
            bitrate_i_q_z_raw_list.append(bitrate[:-4])

    finally:
        f_enc_z.close()
        f_ing_z.close()
        f_ing_q_z.close()

    time_e_z_list = [datetime.datetime.strptime(s, '%H:%M:%S') for s in         time_e_z_raw_list]
    time_i_z_list = [datetime.datetime.strptime(s, '%H:%M:%S') for s in     time_i_z_raw_list]
    time_i_q_z_list = [datetime.datetime.strptime(s, '%H:%M:%S') for s in time_i_q_z_raw_list]

    fig = plt.figure(figsize=(18,16))

    plt.plot(time_e_z_list, bitrate_e_z_list, label="label1", lw=1)
    plt.plot(time_i_z_list, bitrate_i_z_list, label="label2", lw=1)
    plt.plot(time_i_q_z_list, bitrate_i_z_list, label="label3", lw=1)

    minutes = MinuteLocator()
    seconds = SecondLocator()

    ax = plt.gca()
    ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(minutes)
    ax.xaxis.set_minor_locator(seconds)
    ax.xaxis.set_major_formatter(DateFormatter("%H:%M:%S"))
    plt.xlabel('time')
    plt.ylabel('bitrate in bps')
    plt.grid()
    plt.legend(loc='upper right')

    plt.gcf().autofmt_xdate()

    plt.show()

The trouble is when I have the timestamps that ranges over 3+ hours, the graph gets gets distorted. How do I ensure that the range displayed by X-Axis adjusts dynamically based on the range of timestamps I have sampled ? Typically I run for 4+ hours with data points for every 20 seconds. So when I plot I get a really bad graph. How do I fix it ? However, when I have small amounts of data , I get a proper graph.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, I updated my initial answers. Here is one possible solutions. But since you are talking about a CSV file, you might want to take a look at working with time series in Pandas.

import datetime
import random
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

data1 = (1163557.14, 1137578.47, 1139094.66)
times1_raw = ('23:04:17', '23:04:27', '23:04:37')
times1 = [datetime.datetime.strptime(s, '%H:%M:%S') for s in times1_raw]

data2 = (1011000.00, 1011000.00, 1011000.00)
times2_raw = ('23:04:21', '23:04:31', '23:04:41')
times2 = [datetime.datetime.strptime(s, '%H:%M:%S') for s in times2_raw]

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(8,6))

plt.plot(times1, data1, label='data1', lw=2, marker='o')
plt.plot(times2, data2, label='data2', lw=2, marker='s')
plt.xlabel('time in seconds')
plt.ylabel('speed in bps')
plt.grid()
plt.legend(loc='upper right')

plt.gcf().autofmt_xdate()

plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I would ideally want to have the timestamps intact too. So the I want the timestamps to run along the X-Axis. Just that the data points of data1 and data2 are off by a few seconds. Is it possible to have timsestamps on the X-Axis ? –  rajath26 Jul 18 at 0:03
    
Glad to hear. Maybe you can provide some images to show how this problem actually looks like –  Sebastian Raschka Jul 19 at 2:14

Here's how I would approach this problem.

First, try to take advantage of the datetime module. It is a life saver when handling time-stamped data.

We know the smallest increment in the time steps is one second. So let's first make a list containing all possible times.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt  
import datetime

start_date = datetime.datetime(2014,6,17,23,4,17)
end_date = datetime.datetime(2014,6,17,23,6,8)
number_seconds = (end_date - start_date).seconds

time_stamps = [start_date + datetime.timedelta(seconds=t) for t in range(number_seconds)]

Now the list time_stamps is a datetime object, and I presume you just want hour:minute:second from the stamps based on your sample data. We can easily get that with one more list comprehension:

time_stamps_fmt = [datetime.datetime.strftime(t,'%H:%m:%S') for t in time_stamps]

Let's now create an empty arrays to store bps data:

bps_1 = np.zeros([number_seconds],dtype('float'))
bps_2 = np.zeros([number_seconds],dtype('float'))
bps_3 = np.zeros([number_seconds],dtype('float'))

Then populate the corresponding indices of bps_1/2/3 to the time stamps in the .csv files. If the time stamp is not found, insert np.nan for that index, and matplotlib should treat it as a missing value and not plot anything.

You can show the time stamps as x-labels using xticks:

plt.xticks(np.arange(number_seconds), time_stamps_fmt)
share|improve this answer
    
This is an interesting way that you have suggested @N1B4. But if I am running for over 4 hours do you think by indexing every second will help ? –  rajath26 Jul 19 at 1:47
    
You'll have to at least store the data in one-second intervals because that's the smallest frequency that will contain all of your data. But do you need to plot every data point? How about minute averages? Or 10-minute averages? –  N1B4 Jul 19 at 3:33

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