Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm working with legacy Java code which returns java.lang.object. I'm passing it into a function and I'd like to do some implicit conversions as such:

implicit def asInt( _in:Option[Object] ) = _in asInstanceOf[ Option[Int] ]
implicit def asDouble( _in:Option[Object] = _in asInstanceOf[ Option[Double] ]

private def parseEntry( _name:String, _items:Map[String,Object] ) = _name match{
    case docName.m_Constants =>
        new Constants( _items get( Constants m_Epsilon ), _items get( Constant m_Rho ),
                       _items get( Constants m_N ) )

Technically it goes on but I keep getting the same errors: expected Int, Option[Object] found. Here, a focused snap-shot of the problem:

private def foo( _items:Map[String,Object] ) ={
    val bar:Option[Int] = _items get( "Bar" ) }

How have I done my implicits wrong? I was hoping it would do the transformation for me instead of me having to write "asInstanceOf" each and every time.

share|improve this question
1  
As an aside, I really don't advise implicit conversions such as this one. Any time you have to cast inside an implicit conversion, you should take it as a sign that you're probably way off the recommended path. –  Daniel Spiewak Mar 20 '10 at 3:07
    
What would you recommend then when dealing with java.lang.object? –  wheaties Mar 20 '10 at 4:19
1  
In spite of the fact that I answered this question (hey, I like it when there's a question that I can answer :-) ), I agree with @Daniel that implicit type conversion like this should be used with care. Of course, there are cases where run-time type checking and casting are unavoidable, such as when working with legacy Java code that returns collections that lack generic type information. Still, by making those casts implicit, you're saving some typing (yay!) but making it harder for future users of your code to see the risk of a runtime class-cast exception (boo!). –  Joe Carnahan Mar 20 '10 at 12:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your implicit conversion does not apply, because your implicit conversion will convert Option[Object] to Option[Int], but it appears your code is expecting it to convert Object to Option[Int].

Try wrapping _items get( "Bar" ) with Some() to get an Option[Object] instead of just an Object and see if your implicit conversion kicks in.

EDIT: Actually, I'm not sure why this doesn't work for you, given that (as you correctly pointed out in your comment), Scala maps return options. The following code works for me and prints "37", as I would expect it to:

import scala.collection.mutable.Map
import scala.collection.mutable.HashMap

object ImplicitConversions {
    implicit def asInt( _in:Option[Object] ) = _in.asInstanceOf[Option[Int]]
    implicit def asDouble( _in:Option[Object] ) = _in.asInstanceOf[Option[Double]]

    private def foo( _items:Map[String,Object] ) = {
        val bar:Option[Int] = _items.get("Bar")
        println(bar.get.intValue)
    }

    def main(args: Array[String]) {
      val map:Map[String,Object] = new HashMap[String, Object]
      map.put("Bar", Integer.valueOf(37))
      foo(map)
    }
}

However, if I use Java maps, then wrapping with Some() works:

import java.util.Map
import java.util.HashMap

object ImplicitConversions {
    implicit def asInt( _in:Option[Object] ) = _in.asInstanceOf[Option[Int]]
    implicit def asDouble( _in:Option[Object] ) = _in.asInstanceOf[Option[Double]]

    private def foo( _items:Map[String,Object] ) = {
        val intermediate = Some(_items.get("Bar"))
        val bar:Option[Int] = intermediate
        println(bar.get.intValue)
    }

    def main(args: Array[String]) {
      val map:Map[String,Object] = new HashMap[String, Object]
      map.put("Bar", Integer.valueOf(37))
      foo(map)
    }
}

(Note that I did have to store the result of Some() in an intermediate variable to get the conversion to work - Perhaps someone more expert in Scala could show me how to avoid that intermediate step. ;-) )

Is it possible that Scala and Java maps are getting mixed up in your code? You did say that you were calling into legacy Java code, which is why you had to do all of this implicit conversion in the first place. If you're using Java maps when you think you're using Scala maps, then that would explain the disconnect here.

share|improve this answer
1  
But get from Map returns an Option[B], see scala-lang.org/docu/files/api/scala/collection/… –  wheaties Mar 20 '10 at 2:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.