Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 9 x 9 matrix. (think of suduko).

   4 2 1 6 8 1 8 5 8 
   3 1 5 8 1 1 7 5 8 
   1 1 4 0 5 6 7 0 4 
   6 2 5 5 4 4 8 1 2 
   6 8 8 2 8 1 6 3 5 
   8 4 2 6 4 7 4 1 1 
   1 3 5 3 8 8 5 2 2 
   2 6 6 0 8 8 8 0 6 
   8 7 2 3 3 1 1 7 4 

now I wanna be able to get a "quadrant". for example (according to my code) the quadrant 2 , 2 returns the following:

    5 4 4 
    2 8 1 
    6 4 7 

If you've noticed, this is the matrix from the very center of the 9 x 9. I've split everything up in to pairs of "3" if you know what i mean. the first "ROW" is from 0 - 3, the second from 3 - 6, the third for 6 - 9.. I hope this makes sense ( I am open to alternate ways to go about this)

anyways, heres my code. I dont really like this way, even though it works. I do want speed though beccause i am making a suduko solver.

    //a quadrant returns the mini 3 x 3
    //row 1  has three quads,"1", "2", 3"
    //row 2  has three quads "1", "2", "3" etc
    public int[,] GetQuadrant(int rnum, int qnum) {
        int[,] returnMatrix = new int[3, 3];
        int colBegin, colEnd, rowBegin, rowEnd, row, column;

        //this is so we can keep track of the new matrix
        row = 0;
        column = 0;      
        switch (qnum) {
            case 1:
                colBegin = 0;
                colEnd = 3;
                break;
            case 2:
                colBegin = 3;
                colEnd = 6;
                break;
            case 3:
                colBegin = 6;
                colEnd = 9;
                break;
            default:
                colBegin  = 0;
                colEnd = 0;
                break;
        }

        switch (rnum) {
            case 1:
                rowBegin = 0;
                rowEnd = 3;
                break;
            case 2:
                rowBegin = 3;
                rowEnd = 6;
                break;
            case 3:
                rowBegin = 6;
                rowEnd = 9;
                break;
            default:  
                rowBegin = 0;
                rowEnd = 0;
                break;
        }
        for (int i = rowBegin ; i < rowEnd; i++) {
            for (int j = colBegin; j < colEnd; j++) {                 
                returnMatrix[row, column] = _matrix[i, j];
                column++;
            }
            column = 0;
            row++;
        }
        return returnMatrix;
    }
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Unless I'm missing something, why not do math? Fist of all, only store rowBegin and colBegin.

Now, simply issue:

rowBegin = (rnum-1)*3
colBegin = (qnum-1)*3

This maps 1 -> 0, 2 -> 3, and 3-> 6.

Now, you loop from colBegin to colBegin + 3, and rowBegin to rowBegin + 3. Is your default behavior really necessary? If it is, special case when rnum < 1 || rnum > 3 and qnum < 1 || qnum > 3

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks.. I thought about it for a long time. This is kinda sad considering im an undergraduate math student and couldnt pick up the pattern hehe. :P –  masfenix Mar 20 '10 at 1:52
    
I should have known you had a math background. You were referring to the upper left (or bottom left) as (1,1) instead of (0,0). Madness! –  Stefan Kendall Mar 20 '10 at 1:55
    
i am trying to generalize this even more. Instead of recieving coordinate type points, i am going to pass it a number from 1 - 9. where 1 2 3 are the two row, 4, 5, 6, from the second, and so on. –  masfenix Mar 20 '10 at 1:58
    
This is not math but arithmetics. –  Hamish Grubijan Mar 20 '10 at 2:14

The common pattern for this in Python is to use a dict to map:

qmap = {
  1: (0, 3),
  2: (3, 6),
  3: (6, 9),
}

print qmap.get(qnum, (0, 0))

I'm sure that C# supports something similar.

share|improve this answer

For a general solution (i.e.: an NxN grid) I would use some maths (you'll need the modulo operator).

If you're always using a 9x9 sudoku grid then you can pre-calculate the answers and stick them in a map or array.

Of course you can combine those ideas and pre-calculate the answers in your init() function and then store them in a map.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.