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memset is sometimes used to initialize data in a constructor like the example below. Does it work in general ? Is it a good idea in general?

class A {
public:
   A();
private:
   int a;
   float f;
   char str[35];
   long *lp;
};

A::A()
{
   memset(this, 0, sizeof(*this));
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Don't use memset. It's a holdover from C and won't work on non-PODs. Specifically, using it on a derived class that contains any virtual functions -- or any class containing a non-builtin -- will result in disaster.

C++ provides a specific syntax for initialization:

class A {
public:
   A();
private:
   int a;
   float f;
   char str[35];
   long *lp;
};

A::A()
    : a(0), f(0), str(), lp(NULL)
{
}

To be honest, I'm not sure, but memset might also be a bad idea on floating-points since their format is unspecified.

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There's also std::fill or std::fill_n if you need to "memset" an array (or any other sequence) –  jalf Mar 20 '10 at 2:53
    
For the array case it's better to do str(). GCC has problems initializing the char array by a string literal through a member-initializer, and if the array is not a char array it won't work even in a standard conforming compiler. str() will always nullify the array. (i just submitted a bug report: gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=43453 ) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 20 '10 at 3:07
    
@litb: Noted and changed above. –  rlbond Mar 20 '10 at 16:16
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It's a terrible idea. You're just tromping over data, paying no heed to how objects should be initialized. If your class is virtual, you're likely to wipe out the vtable pointer as well.

memset works on raw data, but C++ isn't about raw data. C++ creates abstractions, so if you want to be safe you use those abstractions. Use the initializer list to initialize members.

You can do it to POD types:

struct nothing_fancy_here
{
    bool b;
    int i;
    void* p;
};

nothing_fancy_here x;
memset(&x, 0, sizeof(x));

But if you're doing it on this, that means you're in a user-defined constructor and no longer qualify as a POD type. (Though if all your members are POD it might work, as long as none contain 0 as a trap value. I'm sure not sure if any other sources of undefined behavior come into play here.)

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Doesn't your nothing_fancy_here type also have a constructor? I don't think there's any difference between what you are calling a POD type, and the OPs example class... Whether you are calling memset from within the constructor or not is irrelevant. If it's ok in your example, it's ok in the OP's. –  user123456 Mar 20 '10 at 2:34
    
@STingRay: It has no constructor. Maybe the // ... is too open. –  GManNickG Mar 20 '10 at 2:39
    
It does have a constructor. Granted it's a no-op. The point about whether there is an explicitly-declared constructor or not is irrelevant. What matters is, as you said, whether the struct/class (or any of its members' types) has virtual member functions. If the OP hadn't declared a constructor and called memset just as you did, there is no difference. So the ultimate answer is: in the given examples, it is technically ok to do, but as a general practice, certainly not... –  user123456 Mar 20 '10 at 2:47
2  
@STingRay: Sorry, I meant user-defined constructor. Having a user-defined constructor, like the OP has, means it's not an aggregate and therefore not a POD. Note I'm calling memset outside the class. Calling it in the constructor automatically means it's not a POD type, because I've defined a constructor. –  GManNickG Mar 20 '10 at 2:55
    
<offtopic> Thanks for keeping that other question alive. It's a bit more complicated than I had hoped. –  user123456 Mar 20 '10 at 2:56
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