Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

this is for an assignment at school, where I need to determine the size of the processes on the system using a system call. My code is as follows:

...
struct task_struct *p;
struct vm_area_struct *v;
struct mm_struct *m;
read_lock(&tasklist_lock);
for_each_process(p) {
    printk("%ld\n", p->pid);
    m = p->mm;
    v = m->mmap;
    long start = v->vm_start;
    printk("vm_start is %ld\n", start);
}
read_unlock(&tasklist_lock);
...

When I run a user level program that calls this system call, the output that I get is:

1
vm_start is 134512640
2

EIP: 0073:[<0806e352>] CPU: 0 Not tainted ESP: 007b:0f7ecf04 EFLAGS: 00010246 Not tainted
EAX: 00000000 EBX: 0fc587c0 ECX: 081fbb58 EDX: 00000000
ESI: bf88efe0 EDI: 0f482284 EBP: 0f7ecf10 DS: 007b ES: 007b
081f9bc0: [<08069ae8>] show_regs+0xb4/0xb9
081f9bec: [<080587ac>] segv+0x225/0x23d
081f9c8c: [<08058582>] segv_handler+0x4f/0x54
081f9cac: [<08067453>] sig_handler_common_skas+0xb7/0xd4
081f9cd4: [<08064748>] sig_handler+0x34/0x44
081f9cec: [<080648b5>] handle_signal+0x4c/0x7a
081f9d0c: [<08066227>] hard_handler+0xf/0x14
081f9d1c: [<00776420>] 0x776420


Kernel panic - not syncing: Kernel mode fault at addr 0x0, ip 0x806e352


EIP: 0073:[<400ea0f2>] CPU: 0 Not tainted ESP: 007b:bf88ef9c EFLAGS: 00000246 Not tainted
EAX: ffffffda EBX: 00000000 ECX: bf88efc8 EDX: 080483c8
ESI: 00000000 EDI: bf88efe0 EBP: bf88f038 DS: 007b ES: 007b
081f9b28: [<08069ae8>] show_regs+0xb4/0xb9
081f9b54: [<08058a1a>] panic_exit+0x25/0x3f
081f9b68: [<08084f54>] notifier_call_chain+0x21/0x46
081f9b88: [<08084fef>] __atomic_notifier_call_chain+0x17/0x19
081f9ba4: [<08085006>] atomic_notifier_call_chain+0x15/0x17
081f9bc0: [<0807039a>] panic+0x52/0xd8
081f9be0: [<080587ba>] segv+0x233/0x23d
081f9c8c: [<08058582>] segv_handler+0x4f/0x54
081f9cac: [<08067453>] sig_handler_common_skas+0xb7/0xd4
081f9cd4: [<08064748>] sig_handler+0x34/0x44
081f9cec: [<080648b5>] handle_signal+0x4c/0x7a
081f9d0c: [<08066227>] hard_handler+0xf/0x14
081f9d1c: [<00776420>] 0x776420

The first process (pid = 1) gave me the vm_start without any problems, but when I try to access the second process, the kernel crashes. Can anyone tell me what's wrong, and maybe how to fix it as well? Thanks a lot!

(sorry for the bad formatting....)

edit: This is done in a Fedora 2.6 core in an uml environment.

share|improve this question
    
+1 for studying the kernel :) – Nikolai N Fetissov Mar 20 '10 at 2:53
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Some kernel threads might not have mm filled - check p->mm for NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that solved my problem :) – confusedKid Mar 20 '10 at 2:46

Changed the code to check for null pointers:

m = p->mm;
if (m != 0) {
    v = m->mmap;
    if (v != 0) {
        long start = v->vm_start;
        printk("vm_start is %ld\n", start);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
this is wrong approach - what happened if the process's memory page table is in being modified? So yes, mm may not be null, but the vm_start values is in the midst of modification by another CPU? In SMP scenario, all CPU can execute any parts of the kernel at the same time. So when accessing common shared memory resources like process's pagetable, you need to apply a semaphone lock before safely reading it. – Peter Teoh Oct 17 '15 at 5:14

All process related information can be found at /proc filesystem at the userspace level. Inside the kernel, these information are generated via fs/proc/*.c

http://lxr.linux.no/linux+v3.2.4/fs/proc/

Looking at the file task_mmu.c, which printing all the vm_start information u can observe that all handling of vm_start field always require the mmap_sem to be locked:

           down_read(&mm->mmap_sem);
            for (vma = mm->mmap; vma; vma = vma->vm_next) {
                    clear_refs_walk.private = vma;
...
                    walk_page_range(vma->vm_start, vma->vm_end,
                                    &clear_refs_walk);
share|improve this answer

For kernel threads mm will be null. So whenever you read the mm do it in the following manner.

    down_read(&p->mm->mmap_sem)
          if(mm) {
                 /* read the contents of mm*/
          }
    up_read(&p->mm->mmap_sem)

Also you may use get_task_mm(). With get_task_mm() you need not acquire the lock. Here is how you use it :

   struct mm_struct *mm;
   mm = get_task_mm(p);
   if (mm) {
           /* read the mm contents */
   }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.