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I'm assuming that this (batch deleting):

for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
    updateToStatus1(i, 1); //update table set status = 1 where id = :i
}
deleteAllStatus1();//delete from table where status = 1

is faster than this (deleting one-by-one):

for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
    delete(i); //delete from table where id = i
}

Is my assumption true no matter what index I create on "table"? I'm thinking there would be a lot of locking involved when deleting one-by-one.

Also, if anyone can recommend me good regarding materials regarding such SQL trade-offs, I would be very grateful.

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1  
not always true. what happens if you only have one record? –  Scary Wombat Jul 18 at 8:05
    
I'm intrigued. Let's say that in that case, both codes throw an exception at i=1, then could the batch deleting code be faster still? :D –  b16db0 Jul 18 at 8:09
1  
and what if you set auto commit to false, delete all one by one and then commit the transaction. –  Shail016 Jul 18 at 8:11
    
@Shail016 that got me wondering. Let's say in your case we also have an index for status... –  b16db0 Jul 18 at 8:26
1  
indexes usually slow insert, update and delete queries. –  Shail016 Jul 18 at 9:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm assuming that this (batch deleting):

 for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
        updateToStatus1(i, 1); //update table set status = 1 where id = :i
    }
    deleteAllStatus1();//delete from table where status = 1

is faster than this (deleting one-by-one):

for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
    delete(i); //delete from table where id = i
}

I can only assume that the time taken by first T1 > T2 (time taken by second )

  • in loop1 update(find by id and update staus) is a write operation like delete (find by id and delete row) in loop2
  • if you index status, update will become costly compared to before (as it changes the value of indexed key).
  • indexed status will also have adverse effect on deletion based on status.

I'm thinking there would be a lot of locking involved when deleting one-by-one.

  • That is same for updating one by one also

so your time comparison is between:
updating one by one + deleting all vs deleting one by one

A single transaction commit for same data would take less time than commit in multiple transactions. But here there is update overhead.

Also, if anyone can recommend me good regarding materials regarding such SQL trade-offs

for jdbc tips: http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596000882.do

Chapter 19 Performance

for indexes (though for DB2 still useful): Indexing

I would also suggest you to search for performance tuning for sql queries and data imports/exports for the DB you are using. These are usually available in reference manuals. like:
MySQL sql optimization
InnoDB performance tuning

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I think updating the rows one by one will take about the same time as deleting them one by one (of course depending on indices) - so I can't imagine the combination update + batch-delete to be daster than deleting one by one.

The fastest way would be to have a method delete(int...) that issues a DELETE ... WHERE ID IN(...).

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Can delete ... where id in(...) be faster than delete ... where status = 1? Let's say in our case, status is a smallint and id is a bigint. Also, let's say there are only about 5 unique values for status. :) –  b16db0 Jul 18 at 8:33
1  
The point is the time taken by the updates - and delete .. in will certainly take less roundtrips from your code to the database. Having an index on status will speed up delete.. where status, but it will slow down the updates. The depth of the index-tree might have some effects, but to sum it up - it depends, so measure it!! –  piet.t Jul 18 at 8:57
1  
are you sure indexing will speed up delete? –  Shail016 Jul 18 at 9:00
1  
Again, it depends - indexing might speed up finding the records to be deleted by avoiding full table scans, but might also slow down the actual deletion due to necessary reorganization of the index. –  piet.t Jul 18 at 9:11

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