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I am a .net developer who would like to learn more about Ruby on Rails. I have followed the 5-minute(?!) marketware tutorials, etc, out on the rails site, but would like to learn more by reading real live code.

So what's the best open source resource for learning about RoR in depth?

EDIT: A slight clarification, I am a .net developer working on a Mac, and plan to develop for RoR on OS X (at least one of the answers assumed I am on Windows, so I am now assuming my choice of platform matters in answering this question).

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Closed questions that are of no lasting value whatsoever should be flagged and deleted. This question certainly is of value. This is a great list many people can learn from, and deleting it does more harm than good. –  user142019 Jan 1 '13 at 19:46
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Vote to delete as this is now nearly 5 years old, answers can't be added and it's getting out of date. –  Michael Durrant May 10 '13 at 3:37
    
@MichaelDurrant Answers can't be added, but it's a community wiki so they can certainly be edited and brought up to date. Everyone has to start somewhere, so I wouldn't be so quick to delete someone else's starting point. –  iWasRobbed Jun 10 '13 at 20:11
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I vote to reopen the question, which has garnered a total of almost 400 upvotes and favorites. I disagree with the allegation that it is "not constructive" and it's clear that many others agree. –  Russell Silva Aug 9 '13 at 23:31
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closed as not constructive by Bo Persson, Kev Sep 9 '12 at 12:09

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29 Answers

On my drive I have a number of open-source Rails apps I have used for reference while learning Rails as also sanity checking that I am doing things the "rails-way":

Beast and Mephisto are particularly valuable as they have been developed by high-profile members of the Rails community.

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Links would be good. :-) –  Charles Roper Oct 12 '08 at 19:31
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Beast and Mephisto appear to be dead –  jcm Aug 20 '10 at 23:37
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Now Ruby on Rails 3 Tutorial by Michael Hartl has tutorial for Rails version 3.2. –  twnaing Aug 30 '12 at 10:22
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One approach that might be helpful is to check out some of the rails apps found in the projects that are forked the most often on Github. Here's a few:

  • Inoshi - The open source social networking platform in Ruby on Rails from the author of RailsSpace
  • Mephisto - A popular blogging engine.
  • Radiant - Radiant is a no-fluff, open source content management system designed for small teams.

Also, if you're new to Rails, you might be new to Git, in which case you'll need to install Git before you can pull the source to any of those projects from GitHub. Since you're a .Net developer, I'm guessing you're on Windows. Here's a helpful guide: Getting Started with Git and GitHub on Windows.

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I am planning to develop on OS X, but appreciate the projects (although I Would like to focus on a single 'best' project). –  Jeffrey Meyer Oct 29 '08 at 21:43
    
Grats on coming over to MacOS X =-) A quick google search should turn up helpful install info for you if you don't have Git installed. Or, if you like, I can point you in the right direction. –  Gabe Hollombe Oct 29 '08 at 21:46
    
GitHub has a download button too. You can download the latest version of a project in zip or tar.gz format. –  webmat Oct 30 '08 at 13:24
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An excellent list just appeared at the JetPack Flight Log, reminding me of this question.

To summarise, we have the following (I've linked to source locations as a hedge against the post changing/disappearing, but please try the link above first)

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Your best bet is actually the rails scaffolding itself. For instance, instead of

ruby script/generate recipe

(for a fictional 'recipe' example)

You can do

ruby script/generate scaffold recipe

This does all the MVC creation code that rails normally does for you, plus puts the scaffolding in. It's the same as if you'd done

scaffold :recipe

only this way shows you the code. So you have something working - albeit not prettily - and can move up from there.

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this is definitely good for the extreme basics. It won't however teach you anything in the intermediate to advanced areas. –  Tilendor Oct 11 '08 at 14:57
    
This wont teach you anything, I wouldn't advise a beginner to look at the scaffold code as a means of learning. For use as a demo to the power of rails or to fastrack development then yes. –  zinc Jan 19 '11 at 13:00
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Ruby on Rails itself is open source and you can learn quite a bit about Ruby first and Rails in general by looking at it.

Rosters (http://rosters.rubyforge.org/) and TeachMate (http://teachmate.org/opensource) are both fairly simple (in understandability of ideas and functionality) and offer a good range of features that should help you see how some people are doing RoR.

I should also add that there are free screencasts about rails here at RailsCasts.com (http://railscasts.com/).

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+1 for the Railscasts –  webmat Oct 30 '08 at 13:25
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If you want to have look into some professional and a recent one (although, still not finished) code, browse through this repository: http://github.com/spot-us/spot-us/tree/master - its an application developed by the Obie Fernandez's Hashrocket team.

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On my drive I have a number of open-source Rails apps I have used for reference while learning Rails as also sanity checking that I am doing things the "rails-way":

Beast and Mephisto are particularly valuable as the have been developed by high-profile members of the Rails community.

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I would recommend one of the books that walk you through the process of creating a complex application (e.g. social networking site) from scratch in Ruby on Rails. The complete source code can be found on their websites.

My favorite book is RailsSpace: Building a Social Networking Website with Ruby on Rails.

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The Redmine issue tracking system. Pretty impressive issue tracking system with SCM integration.

Redmine

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The scaffolding is certainly a great introduction to the framework.

"Agile Web Development" is an excellent book and the depot application provides the basis for numerous entities that are requested on web sites today.

*Edit - Reference to project was removed since it is no longer available. Thanks Brian! Shame that project never took off, unless they renamed it.

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Thanks for the heads up. –  Adam Sep 28 '10 at 18:38
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You can find in RubyForge many good and active projects...

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Community Engine - It's a plugin to build social network apps

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moved url: communityengine.org –  Brian Maltzan Sep 21 '10 at 16:58
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This doesn't answer your question, but you must have some kind of app in mind, and you can find examples for a lot of different functionality here:

http://www.opensourcerails.com/

this was good, but hasn't been updated in awhile

http://sample.caboo.se/

I think all tutorial books now have downloadable code, and a lot of those zip files are complete, working example apps that aren't gigantic repos like, say the reddit codebase. (I learned from the apps in the back of Scott Raymond's ajax on Rails book, which is great, but the apps are probably also not updated. I also liked the railsspace book. It's actually interesting to substitute HAML/SASS for eRb, make an app non-RESTFUL, substitute sphinx for ferret, whatever.

http://examples.oreilly.com/9780596527440/

http://railsspace.com/book

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I enjoyed reading through the code for BucketWise, by Jamis Buck. I've been working with Rails for a while, but I certainly picked up a trick or two.

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You could take a look at Open Source Rails. I'm not sure how many of them are using Rails 3 though and I'm not sure how great the quality will be i.e. how will you know whether they use best practice.

Robin

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https://github.com/sferik/rails_admin looks like it has all your requirements.

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The depot application that is described in the Agile Web Development book has been very useful for me.

You can get the code here, however the book explains it step by step.

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here's some links about using the depot app with rails 2.0 groups.google.com/group/rubyonrails-talk/browse_thread/thread/… woonzai.com/blog/2007/12/18/… –  Gene T Oct 11 '08 at 14:34
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Here are some social networking focussed ones, which cover quite a lot of ground and are thus well worth looking at:

And BaseApp is pretty cool too. It's a sort of starter app styled along the lines of 37 Signals' apps, such as (unsurprisingly) BaseCamp:

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I'd also recommend the beast forum:

http://github.com/rubyonbr/beast/tree

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I'm on the same road so I can recommend this book:

Rails for .Net Developers

It teaches the basics of RoR, without them it's hard to really understand code from open source projects.

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http://www.railspassion.com gives overview of open source rails applications, from which you can kick start your rails development.

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Diaspora is growing and it might be interesting to dig into it's code:

https://github.com/diaspora/diaspora

Gemfile is worth to have a look:

https://github.com/diaspora/diaspora/blob/master/Gemfile

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The best way to learn is by making something. If its real life application that you plan to use its even better. Just don't add too much complexity. Worked for me.

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Real world implementations of Ruby on Rails:

http://rubyonrails.org/applications

The best of open source Ruby on Rails projects:

http://www.opensourcerails.com/

To gain experience, you could throw down a site of your own, doesn't have to be anything wondrous on the code side to be able to drive an app.

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goooooooooood.......... –  sadiqxs Jan 17 '13 at 10:32
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what about Typo and Cookbook that comes with InstantRails? :)

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They only use scaffold codes. –  twnaing Aug 30 '12 at 10:21
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A bit of shameless self-promotion here, but I've worked on rboard for quite a while now: http://github.com/radar/rboard and I consider it as an example of a good rails app.

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The only app I can think of is Railscasts. Sources are available at github. The sample app from Railstutorial.org could be helpful too, but it's not a real-world application.

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Adding to this, opensourcerails.com has tons of open source apps to check out, it might be worth mentioning these also –  Lee Jarvis Jun 28 '11 at 7:52
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You can take a look at RedMine, an open source issue-tracker written in Ruby on Rails. http://redmine.rubyforge.org/svn/branches/1.2-stable/

Though I'm not sure if they use any of the best practices. IMO a lot of open source projects tend to have very bad code in them, at least the ones I've worked with.

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Here's a pretty extensive open source shopping platform: https://github.com/spree/spree

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