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The Arabic Alphabet and Its Transliteration The Arabic Alphabet and Its Transliteration (gif)

The Bulgarian Alphabet and Its Transliteration The Bulgarian Alphabet and Its Transliteration (gif)

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1  
There is no single tranliteration for any single language. There are, for example, about 5 standards for representing Arabic in the latin alphabet, several for Chinese, a few for Koren, etc. And this is not a programming question. –  bmargulies Mar 20 '10 at 17:55
    
I wonder to see at least one of each - 1 for Chinese, one for Koren, etc. If there are more - I'll love to see them 2!) –  Rella Mar 20 '10 at 17:58

3 Answers 3

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Many transliteration systems for Ukrainian can be found on this page. Similarly, Wikipedia can help you with other languages as well :)

P.S. Probably the best transliteration table for Ukrainian: TCNS (ТКПН) Transliteration of Ukrainian (developed in 1994)

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For Arabic I actually recommend using SATTS, which only uses characters that appear on standard US keyboard. No need of italics to differentiate letters which is just confusing. I used to be able to type in SATTS as fast as english, so I think it is a good system.

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I can transliterate Russian for you.

Russian alphabet (Русский Алфавит)

А а - A a

Б б - B b

В в - V v

Г г - G g

Д д - D d

Е е - similar to the English e, but it makes a "ye" sound, like in the Russian word, привет (means hello), pronounced "privyet"

Ё ё - doesn't have a literal translation, makes a "yo" sound.

Ж ж - zh similar to the sound of the s in pleasure

З з - Z z

И и - I i (pronounced like e, as in taxi

Й й - Y y

К к - K k

Л л - L l

М м - M m

Н н -N

О о - O o

П п - P p

Р р - R r

С с - S Т т - T t

У у - U u

Ф ф - F f

Х х - H h

Ц ц - not a literal translation, makes a "ts" sound

Ч ч - again not a literal translation, makes a "ch" sound

Ш ш -makes a "sh" sound

Щ щ - makes a "sht" sound (most English speakers have a hard time differentiating the ш and щ)

Ъ - not an actual letter, it is called the hard sign, it creates a pause between syllables, like in the Russian word, подъем ( which mean rise), pronounced like "pod-yem"

Ы ы - I i similar to the letter и, but not pronounced with an e sound, more like the I sound in the word "it"

Ь - soft sign, like the hard sign, it has no sound, the soft sign makes the previous letter soft, like the word сказать, (which means to say) would be written like -skazat' - and the t would have a less pronounced sound

Ю ю - more like and "uh" sound unlike the letter У, which has a long u sound

Я я - pronounced like "ya"

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