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I am having problems when changing between Portrait and Landscape modes under IOS and Android. I have Portrait and Landscape modes allowed for both. I am handling any orientation changes using SDL, I am setting the new aspect ratio of the camera and calling glViewport with the new resolution. In my case Portrait is 640x1136 and Landscape is the reverse 1136x640 . This is my end result where in Portrait the Model is bigger compared to Landscape.

Portrait

Landscape

Here is the relevant part of the code.

float width = displayMode.w;

float height = displayMode.h;


float aspect = width/height;
m_pCamera->SetAspect(aspect);

glViewport(0, 0, width, height);

while(game->running)
{
     while (SDL_PollEvent(&event)) {
            if (event.type == SDL_WINDOWEVENT && event.window.event == SDL_WINDOWEVENT_RESIZED)
            {
                width = event.window.data1;
                height = event.window.data2;

                aspect = width/height;
                m_pCamera->SetAspect(aspect);

                glViewport(0, 0, width, height);
            }
}
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Projection matrices are normally calculated to keep the displayed coordinate range in y-direction the same. Based on your pictures, it looks like this is exactly what you're getting. So in that sense, this is a case of FAD (Functions As Designed). Are you looking for something where the physical size of the geometry remains the same after changing the screen orientation? –  Reto Koradi Jul 19 at 22:30
    
Yeah I would like to maintain the size of geometry after the orientation change. Ideally I would like to to crop the new resolution and maintain the scale of the object. –  sabotage3d Jul 19 at 22:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The commonly used calculation for the perspective projection matrix maintains the range of geometry shown along the y-axis. This is exactly what is shown in your picture, so it's the expected behavior for a standard perspective.

To get what you're looking for, you need to slightly tweak the perspective matrix calculation. Instead of keeping the range along the y-axis constant, you can keep the range for the axis that corresponds to the larger screen dimension constant. Using this, the size of your objects will stay the same when the device is rotated.

The perspective matrix that keeps the y-range constant is calculated like this, with tanAng2 being the tan of half the field of view, and aspRat the aspect ratio:

[ 1 / (aspRat * tanAng2)       0                0                  0           ]
[           0             1 / tanAng2           0                  0           ]
[           0                  0        (n + f) / (n - f)  2 * n * f / (n - f) ]
[           0                  0               -1                  0           ]

The interesting matrix elements in this context are m00 and m11, since they determine how x and y are scaled. Focusing on those two, and substituting width / height for aspRat:

m00 = height / (width * tanAng2)
m11 = 1 / tanAng2

To keep the x-range constant instead, these matrix elements would be calculated as:

m00 = 1 / tanAng2
m11 = width / (height * tanAng2)

With those values, the field of view is directly applied to the x-direction, where it was the y-direction before. Also, m11 / m00 is still aspRat, which is necessary to avoid distortion of the rendered geometry.

All that is left is choosing between the two depending on if width or height is bigger:

if (height > width) {
    m00 = height / (width * tanAng2)
    m11 = 1 / tanAng2
} else {
    m00 = 1 / tanAng2
    m11 = width / (height * tanAng2)
}

All the remaining matrix elements stay the same, as in the full matrix shown above.

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