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I am using Visual Studio 2012 C#

I am trying to return a result to a setter in a class based on an enum choice selected by a user. The enum is as below:

public TransactionType transactiontypes
    {
        get
        {
            return _Transactiontypes;
        }
        set
        {
            SetPropertyValue("transactiontypes", ref _Transactiontypes, value);
        }
    }

public enum TransactionType:byte
{
    Unknown = 0, CaseFile = 2, Litigant = 3, Court = 4
}

So I created a class that uses a condition based on the enum choice:

 public Decimal TransactCredit
    {
        get
        {
            return _TransactCredit;
        }

        if (TransactionType = 1)

        set

        {
            SetPropertyValue("TransactCredit", ref _TransactBalance, value);
        }

        else set
        {
            SetPropertyValue("TransactCredit", ref _TransactCredit, value);
        }

    }



    public Decimal TransactBalance
    {
        get
        {
            return _TransactBalance;
        }
        set
        {
            SetPropertyValue("TransactBalance", ref _TransactBalance, value);
        }
    }

I keep getting an error that highlights the "If" word requires a "get or set accessor". How would I correctly write the above conditional statements?

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2  
The property syntax in your example is totally out of left field. You cannot mix conditional statements and setters that way. I suggest you read up on your C# basics. –  metacubed Jul 20 '14 at 6:21
1  
I'm not sure where you decided this syntax would work, but I'm pretty sure any simple search for "C# setter" would give you every hint that this makes no sense with regards to the C# spec. –  Matthew Haugen Jul 20 '14 at 6:23
    
Why you calling a separate set method in setter property. Why can't you implement the same logic set property itself? if that's the case, make your property a read-only by means of having only a getter and use the set method separately for setting variable. –  Rahul Jul 20 '14 at 6:35
    
-1 for imaginary syntax. Go learn the correct syntax - it's not necessary to imagine it. –  John Saunders Jul 20 '14 at 6:36

2 Answers 2

The compiler reads your get and set on a property and effectively rewrite those into two methods: TransactCredit_getter() and TransactCredit_setter(Decimal Value). As a result, putting a condition outside of the boundaries of either keyword makes no sense. That would be like writing your own methods and attempting to apply some sort of condition on which should be run, in the class definition. Rather, you should do your test inside your set operation.

public Decimal TransactCredit
{
    get
    {
        return _TransactCredit;
    }
    set
    {
        if (TransactionType == 1)
        {
            SetPropertyValue("TransactCredit", ref _TransactBalance, value);
        }
        else
        {
            SetPropertyValue("TransactCredit", ref _TransactCredit, value);
        }
    }
}

Although in fairness, and I say this without knowing everything about your code or the application, this seems like a time when your design might be losing readability. Are you sure this is the best solution for your scenario?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Matthew Haugen. Found it necessary to change "if (TransactionType == 1)" to "if (transactiontypes == TransactionType.CaseFile)" otherwise it would give a cast as int error –  Robert Omete Jul 20 '14 at 9:01

Your code has syntax errors. Try following instead

    public Decimal TransactCredit
    {
        get
        {
            return _TransactCredit;
        }



        set
        {
            if (TransactionType == 1)
            {
                SetPropertyValue("TransactCredit", ref _TransactBalance, value);
            }

            else 
            {
                SetPropertyValue("TransactCredit", ref _TransactCredit, value);
            }
        }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @TilakFound it necessary to change "if (TransactionType == 1)" to "if (transactiontypes == TransactionType.CaseFile)" otherwise it would give a cast as int error –  Robert Omete Jul 20 '14 at 9:01
    
yes. because enum is of type byte. So it has to be changed to either TransactionType == (byte)1, or transactiontypes == TransactionType.CaseFile –  Tilak Jul 20 '14 at 9:10

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