Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say we have two classes, Base and Child. Child inherits Base. Value is a constant variable (or a enum value) defined in Base, so it can be accessed by Base::Value.

Now we are dealing with some variables of type Child. I notice that in many documents and sample codes, people tend to use Base::Value instead of Child::Value though they are dealing with Child instances. For example, in Qt library there are QIODevice and QBuffer (the later is a child of the former), and QBuffer has a method open. The documents tend to use something like buffer.open(QIODevice::ReadWrite, ...); instead of buffer.open(QBuffer::ReadWrite, ...);. There are many other examples I believe you all have seen frequently.

I'm a bit curious why people tend to use the base classes to access those values, since sometimes we don't know for sure in which classes is the value defined, and more importantly, it is possible that the child classes may override the values defined in base classes. So isn't it the best to access constant values through the current class (WhateverClassBeingUsed::Value)?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm a bit curious why people tend to use the base classes to access those variables, since sometimes we don't know for sure in which classes is the value defined, and more importantly, it is possible that the child classes may override the values defined in base classes.

Sure, but both of these scenarios are hideously bad code and you want to avoid them. You cannot override the value of an enum, you could only define a coincidentally-named enum. It would be a totally different type and it would not compile.

Not knowing for sure in which class it's defined is only useful for implementation details... the user has to know which class to use, so they find out and then they use it.

There's no genuine loss by using the class in which the enum is defined.

share|improve this answer
    
It does compile since names in derived hide the names in base. But yes, that's hideous. –  T.C. Jul 20 at 8:57
    
@T.C.: You forgot the part where he passes it to another function. Doesn't work. –  Puppy Jul 20 at 9:40
    
Name change? :-S –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 at 9:41
    
@Puppy: Ah, right, if the function takes the enum type. If it takes an int or if it's a static const int instead of an enum it'd compile. –  T.C. Jul 20 at 9:44
    
@Kerrek: Yep. The avatar's the clue here :P –  Puppy Jul 20 at 10:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.