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I'm trying to create a function that validates data stored in my database. Say I have a table Foo. For each item in Foo i call a function say Bar which validates it by using a set of checks. If the data is not correct, I store the item id along with a description of the reason of failure in a hash. The hash is pushed on to an array.

ErrorList = []
MyHash = Hash.new {|h,k| h[k]=[]}
Foo.each do |f|
    unless f.valid?
        MyHash["foo_id"] = f.id
        MyHash["description"] = "blah blah blah"
        ErrorList.push MyHash
    end
end

At the end of execution, all entries in the array are the same since the hash entries are overwritten. Is there a way I can use this hash to store different id's and description in my array. Otherwise, is there a way to use objects instead to overcome this issue?

I'm using rails version 2.3.5

share|improve this question
    
Where is the method Bar used? –  sawa Jul 20 '14 at 12:19
    
i should've written the statement f.valid? as Bar(f) –  haanimasood Jul 20 '14 at 14:00
    
@haanimasood, that's OK, we understand what you mean. –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 20 '14 at 14:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First MyHash shouldn't be camel case, but you can just do...

myhash = {}
Foo.each do |f|
    unless f.valid?
        myhash[f.id] = "blah blah blah"
    end
end

Assuming all the id's are unique, you only need this hash. This will set the key value pair to: id: blah blah blah

share|improve this answer
    
You mean f.id, not "f.id" –  Uri Agassi Jul 20 '14 at 12:20
    
Yep - you're right, thanks Uri. –  Anthony Jul 20 '14 at 12:22
    
+1 for the camel case remark. Indeed, there is no need for "my hash" to be a constant at all, it can be a variable myhash (as you wrote) or my_hash (snake case). Should it be necessary to make it a constant, it should be in upcase snake, MY_HASH. Camel case (MyHash) is reserved for modules and classes. –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 20 '14 at 14:39
    
A small clarification: the objection is not that MyHash is written in camel-case; it's that the first letter is capitalized, which makes it a constant rather than a variable. The same objection would apply if it were written Myhash. –  Cary Swoveland Jul 21 '14 at 5:50

I believe you could write the above using reject and map:

error_list = foos.reject(&:valid?).map do |f| 
  { "foo_id" => f.id, "description" => "blah blah blah" }
end

This will create a list of hashes, each with a "foo_id" and "description" of all the invalid foos.


To make your code work, you need to make sure you are creating a new hash for each element in the list, and not re-using the hash you already created:

ErrorList = []
Foo.each do |f|
  unless f.valid?
    my_hash = Hash.new {|h,k| h[k]=[]}
    my_hash["foo_id"] = f.id
    my_hash["description"] = "blah blah blah"
    ErrorList.push my_hash
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
wouldn't this cause a lot of overhead? –  haanimasood Jul 20 '14 at 13:44
    
@haanimasood - what overhead? –  Uri Agassi Jul 20 '14 at 13:45
    
creating a new hash each time that is.. –  haanimasood Jul 20 '14 at 13:58
1  
@haanimasood - if you want a list of hashes - you need to create each of them, how can you do it otherwise? –  Uri Agassi Jul 20 '14 at 13:59
    
Yes you are right.. I was just hoping for something better and faster.. What if we use a new class and call its constructor to set values for id and description? Would that be faster in terms of execution time? –  haanimasood Jul 20 '14 at 14:07

It was Matz himself who pointed out that, over time, "object-oriented" became such a common term, that we tend to underestimate its power. However old-fashioned it may sound, Ruby is an OO language, and you should write OO programs with it. There are many possible approaches. One possible example would be

class ValidatedTable < Array
  def self.new array=[]
    array.each_with_object new do |e, o| o << e end unless array.empty?
    super
  end

  def << element
    fail TypeError, "blah blah blah" unless element.valid?
    super
  end
end

And now, with this ValidatedTable whose #<< method complains about invalid inputs, we can easily achieve your objective:

validated_table, error_list = Foo.each_with_object [ ValidatedTable.new, [] ] do |e, o|
  begin
    o[0] << e
  rescue TypeError => msg
    e[1] << { id: e.id, description: msg.to_s }
  end
end

The distinctive aspect of this solution is that it creates a special subclass of array, ValidatedTable, which, at any moment, is guaranteed to only contain valid elements. Attempts to push invalid elements into it raise an error, which can be rescued and used to produce an error list.

share|improve this answer
    
Boy, this is a big hammer for a small problem... why is it better than the naive approach? it looks to me longer, less readable, less maintainable, and less perfomant than the solutions suggested so far... –  Uri Agassi Jul 20 '14 at 13:32
    
Nice one, the best (and most pedagogic) answer –  Benjamin Sinclaire Jul 20 '14 at 14:05
    
@UriAgassi, you are absolutely right that defining a problem in terms of an OO framework introduces overhead. As Benjamin Sinclaire noted, I do it for didactic reasons. Whenever writing nonreusable code, we may skip overhead such as comments, tests, documentation and proper objectification. My answer applies to reusable code only. There is also this phenomenon, I don't know what's its name, that originally throwaway scripts end up growing into reusable gems. –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 20 '14 at 14:14

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