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I'm trying to a bit modified of built-in allocation function:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <new>

struct A
{
    int a;
    A(){ std::cout << "Constructor\n"; a = 3; }
    void* operator new(std::size_t t) noexcept
    {
        ::operator new(t);
        return NULL;
    }
};

int main()
{
    new A();
}

demo

Instead of constructor call I've got segmentation fault. Could you explain that behavior?

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BTW, if you don't want your operator new to leak exceptions, use ::operator new(t, std::nothrow) –  Brian Jul 20 at 19:20
    
(Otherwise a failed allocation will call std::terminate with no opportunity for the calling code to recover) –  Brian Jul 20 at 19:20
    
@Brian Thanks for mentioning that; I have edited my answer to accommodate for your recommendation. –  cybermonkey Jul 20 at 19:24
2  
This question is a lot more interesting than it looks. Returning a null pointer from operator new() has to be legal, because the nothrow version does. And then the new-expression should evaluate to a null pointer without calling any constructor at all. –  Ben Voigt Jul 20 at 19:26
    
@BenVoigt I never thought of it in that way. The big question is: why is this considered 'legal'? Maybe because the code created a duplicate of t? –  cybermonkey Jul 20 at 19:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have a bug, because the call to ::operator new() could throw std::bad_alloc, violating the exception-specification of your class-specific allocator (zybox's answer shows how to fix this). However, that's very unlikely to happen in such a small program. It's also a bad idea to override operator new() without also providing operator delete(), although I can't find an explicit requirement that both must be found in the same scope.

Returning a null pointer from your allocator is both legal and the correct way to indicate an allocation failure. In 3.7.4.1, the Standard says that:

An allocation function that fails to allocate storage can invoke the currently installed new-handler function (18.6.2.3), if any. [ Note: A program-supplied allocation function can obtain the address of the currently installed new_handler using the std::get_new_handler function (18.6.2.4). — end note ] If an allocation function declared with a non-throwing exception-specification (15.4) fails to allocate storage, it shall return a null pointer. Any other allocation function that fails to allocate storage shall indicate failure only by throwing an exception (15.1) of a type that would match a handler (15.3) of type std::bad_alloc (18.6.2.1).

Then in 5.3.4:

If the allocation function returns null, initialization shall not be done, the deallocation function shall not be called, and the value of the new-expression shall be null.

The code is legal on the path that ::operator new() doesn't throw -- the expression new A() in main() evaluates to a null pointer, which is ok because it never gets dereferenced.

You shouldn't get a constructor call either. What you should get is a memory leak, since there is no ::operator delete() call corresponding to the ::operator new(t) inside your allocator.

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3  
I hope there's a comment coming explaining the downvote; I'm quite interested if someone has a Standard citation making member operator new without operator delete undefined behavior. –  Ben Voigt Jul 20 at 19:48
    
Even more interesting is operator delete without operator new! –  Neil Kirk Jul 20 at 20:00
    
N37979 5.3.4/21 appears to cover the case of T::operator new existing without T::operator delete –  Matt McNabb Jul 20 at 21:15
    
It seems a bit fishy that new T can return a null pointer sometimes –  Matt McNabb Jul 20 at 21:19
    
@Ben Voigt You did not point out the reason of the segmentation fault. –  Vlad from Moscow Jul 20 at 21:24

Your function operator new contains a null pointer, and as such doesn't actually return anything.

The null function operator is equal to return false;, or just return;, but be warned: duplicating a pointer using the new operator causes memory leaks if you aren't careful. To get around this, just delete(t) when you're done.

The following code will fix your issue:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <new>

struct A
{
    int a;
    A(){ std::cout << "Constructor\n"; a = 3; }
    void* operator new(std::size_t t) noexcept
    {
        return ::operator new(t, std::nothrow);
    }
};

int main()
{
    new A();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Your text doesn't make any sense; the function returns a null pointer (which is a thing). It is not equivalent to return; which would be illegal here. Further, OP is asking about what is supposed to happen when operator new does return NULL. Suggesting he stop returning NULL does not address the question. –  Matt McNabb Jul 21 at 4:37

The original code simply returns NULL from A::operator new, quietly forgetting the return result of ::operator new (a memory leak). The reason for the crash is that the pointer returned is then used as the this pointer for the new A object. Since that pointer is NULL, anything the constructor does with the object (assigning a = 3) is dereferencing NULL. That results in a segmentation violation. zyboxinternational's answer above gives a good solution, and the comments of both previous posters are very relevant.

share|improve this answer
    
"the pointer returned is then used as the this pointer for the new A object" Not when it is null. When the pointer returned is null, it becomes the result of the new-expression (new A()) without any constructor executing. –  Ben Voigt Jul 21 at 18:20

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