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I want to use the placeholder %f to set different frequencies for my sin wave sound output, for each key. However, I get the error message 'SyntaxError: can't assign to literal'. I checked to see if my syntax was incorrect, though I found a similar example - can anyone see what the problem is and why my code won't run? traceback: File "test.py", line 50 (Python, Pygame).

   import pygame
    from pygame.locals import *

import math
import numpy

bits = 16
#the number of channels specified here is NOT 
#the channels talked about here http://www.pygame.org/docs/ref/mixer.html#pygame.mixer.get_num_channels

pygame.mixer.pre_init(44100, -bits, 2)
pygame.init()

size = (1200, 720)
_display_surf = pygame.display.set_mode(size, pygame.HWSURFACE | pygame.DOUBLEBUF)


duration = 1.0          # in seconds

#this sounds totally different coming out of a laptop versus coming out of headphones

sample_rate = 44100

n_samples = int(round(duration*sample_rate))

#setup our numpy array to handle 16 bit ints, which is what we set our mixer to expect with "bits" up above
buf = numpy.zeros((n_samples, 2), dtype = numpy.int16)
max_sample = 2**(bits - 1) - 1

    #default frequency - not used
frequency = 440

for s in range(n_samples):
        t = float(s)/sample_rate    # time in seconds

#This will keep the sound playing forever, the quit event handling allows the pygame window to close without crashing
_running = True
while _running:

    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == KEYDOWN:
            if event.key == K_a:
                    frequency = 261.6
                    buf[s][0] = int(round(max_sample*math.sin(2*math.pi*frequency*t)))        # left
                    buf[s][1] = int(round(max_sample*0.5*math.sin(2*math.pi*frequency*t)))    # right

                    sound = pygame.sndarray.make_sound(buf)
                    sound.play()

                elif event.key == K_s:
                    frequency = 293.7
                    buf[s][0] = int(round(max_sample*math.sin(2*math.pi*frequency*t)))        # left
                    buf[s][1] = int(round(max_sample*0.5*math.sin(2*math.pi*frequency*t)))    # right
                    sound = pygame.sndarray.make_sound(buf)
                    sound.play()

        if event.type == KEYUP:
            sound.stop()

        if event.type == pygame.QUIT or event.type == KEYDOWN:
            if event.key == K_ESCAPE:
                _running = False
                break

pygame.quit()
share|improve this question
    
You should give us the entire traceback. Just the error message isn't as helpful as knowing where it happened. – TheSoundDefense Jul 20 '14 at 21:48
    
'%f' = 261.6 makes no sense - you can't assign a float to a string literal. However, it isn't clear what you are trying to do, so I can't really provide an answer. – jonrsharpe Jul 20 '14 at 21:50
    
File "test.py", line 50 – user3856179 Jul 20 '14 at 21:51
    
Show full error message (traceback). There is number of line with problem - mark this line in code. – furas Jul 20 '14 at 21:51
    
numerical frequency value has to change corresponding to each key press, to play a sound with that freq. – user3856179 Jul 20 '14 at 21:52
up vote 0 down vote accepted

String "%f" can be variable name. You can't assign '%f' = 261.6 - this is your error "can't assign to literal".

Name it for example freq and use it in place of "%f"

freq = 261.6

sin(2*math.pi* freq *t)

BTW: Placeholder %f can be use only in string formating (or string parsing).


EDIT:

import pygame
from pygame.locals import *

import math
import numpy


def generate_sound(freq):

    #setup our numpy array to handle 16 bit ints, which is what we set our mixer to expect with "bits" up above
    buf = numpy.zeros((n_samples, 2), dtype = numpy.int16)
    max_sample = 2**(bits - 1) - 1

    for s in range(n_samples):
        t = float(s)/sample_rate    # time in seconds
        buf[s][0] = int(round(max_sample*math.sin(2*math.pi*freq*t)))        # left
        buf[s][1] = int(round(max_sample*0.5*math.sin(2*math.pi*freq*t)))    # right

    return pygame.sndarray.make_sound(buf)


bits = 16
#the number of channels specified here is NOT 
#the channels talked about here http://www.pygame.org/docs/ref/mixer.html#pygame.mixer.get_num_channels

pygame.mixer.pre_init(44100, -bits, 2)
pygame.init()

size = (1200, 720)
screen = pygame.display.set_mode(size, pygame.HWSURFACE | pygame.DOUBLEBUF)


duration = 1.0          # in seconds

#this sounds totally different coming out of a laptop versus coming out of headphones

sample_rate = 44100

n_samples = int(round(duration*sample_rate))


#default frequency - not used
sound = None
sound_261_6 = generate_sound(261.6)
sound_293_7 = generate_sound(293.7)

#This will keep the sound playing forever, the quit event handling allows the pygame window to close without crashing
_running = True
while _running:

    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            _running = False

        if event.type == KEYDOWN:
            if event.key == K_ESCAPE:
                _running = False
            elif event.key == K_a:
                if not sound:
                    sound = sound_261_6
                    sound.play()

            elif event.key == K_s:
                if not sound:
                    sound = sound_261_6
                    sound.play()

        if event.type == KEYUP:
            if sound:
                sound.stop()
                sound = None

pygame.quit()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is what I needed, however, I've changed it to a variable name and gave it a default frequency value, 440. When on keypress this frequency value is supposed to change corresponding to the key, it doesn't. I get a 440 frequency sound for all keypresses. I will update the code in the original post to show what it now says. – user3856179 Jul 20 '14 at 22:07
    
if you change freq then you have to call code with sin(2*math.pi* freq *t) again. – furas Jul 20 '14 at 22:10
    
I have already done this, see code above. – user3856179 Jul 20 '14 at 22:12
    
Well, how to say, you have to call all the code - for s in range(n_samples): too – furas Jul 20 '14 at 22:17
    
Again, thank you so much, I have one more question though: this new code works brilliantly other than the fact that there is about a half second delay between the keypress and the note being played. Is this because of the time taken to carry out the for loop, and is there any way to remove this delay? – user3856179 Jul 20 '14 at 22:28

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