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New to Objective-C (and programming for that matter), so please don't be too harsh if this question is very basic.

Apart from my main.m class, I have a Student.h and Student.m class, which I created. I am trying to avoid using many getters and setters for future projects, and if I'm correct, @property can help me with that. My basic code that works is this:

Student.h:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Student : NSObject{

NSString *name;
int age;

}

//setters
- (void)setName:(NSString*)fName;
- (void)setAge:(int)newAge;

//getters
- (NSString*)getName;
- (int)getAge;


@end

Student.m:

#import "Student.h"

@implementation Student

- (void)setName:(NSString*)fName {

   name = fName;

}

- (void)setAge:(int)newAge {

   age = newAge;

}

- (NSString*)getName {

   return name;
}


- (int)getAge {

   return age;
}


@end 

Can I use @property to have something like this, which would avoid using getter and setter methods? Or do I understand it all wrong?

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Student : NSObject{


}

@property int age;
@property NSString *name;


@end
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your properties are good –  Bryan Chen Jul 20 '14 at 22:28

2 Answers 2

Are you coming from Java perhaps?

Yes, Objective-C used to require getters and setters to be written out laboriously by hand. Nowadays if you use @property and don't go out of your way to do anything else then a suitable instance variable and an appropriate getter and setter will be generate for you.

So the following is a complete class with usable properties, accessible either via traditional setName:/name-style setters and getters or via the dot notation (which calls the setters and getters despite looking like a C struct access:

@interface Student : NSObject

@property int age;
@property NSString *name;

@end

/* ... */

@implementation Student
@end

Also as a general encapsulation / data-hiding comment, notice that Objective-C has long ago been modified so that instance variables can be declared in the [unpublished] @implementation rather than the [published] @interface. On a technical level it was all to do with the ABI and the fragile base class problem, neither of which haunts the modern runtime.

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Few things:

  1. In Objective C you don't use get prefix for getters. You should use either plain name or with 'is' prefix for boolean properties. (Objective C conventions reference)
  2. You really won't avoid using getters and setters. @property notation just defines them for you (maybe with some additional behaviors like copying the value instead of assigning it). It's just the matter of . notation. Underneath it's using getter/setter methods. Here you have a bit more on properties (Objetive C properties reference).
  3. You should define your NSString property as (copy). It's much better to have as if you change it somewhere else it will affect this object (and probably you want to avoid that).
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