Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is it possible to ignore set and get when I'm assigning to or retrieving a value?

In specific, I'm inheriting from a class that has a property declared like this:

virtual public Int32 Value { get; set; }

What I'd like to do is to override it and do something useful in those set and get's. The problem appears when I override it, I also have to manually assign, or return the value from the property. If I do something like this:

override public Int32 Value
{
    get
    {
        return this.Value;
    }
    set
    {
        this.Value = value;
        // do something useful
    }

Then I'm creating an infinite loop. Is there a way to set or get the value without invoking the code in set and get, or do I have to make a separate name for the actual variable?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Instead of using this.Value, you should be using base.Value. That will retrieve/set the property in the base class.

Note that the base method actually has to be overridable (virtual or abstract); in your example it's not. If the base method is not virtual then you'll just get a compiler error when you try to override in the derived class.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, it actually is virtual, I just forgot to type it in here, thanks a lot. – Cbsch Mar 21 '10 at 2:51

The keyword you are after is base, documented here. This forces the compiler to resolve the property reference to the one defined in the base class. The VB.NET Equivalent is MyBase.

Thus:

get 
{ 
    return base.Value; 
} 
set 
{ 
    base.Value = value; 
    // do something useful 
} 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.