Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Anyone have a good resource or provide a sample of a natural order sort in C# for an FileInfo array? I am implementing the IComparer interface in my sorts.

share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

up vote 86 down vote accepted

The easiest thing to do is just P/Invoke the built-in function in Windows, and use it as the comparison function in your IComparer:

[DllImport("shlwapi.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
private static extern int StrCmpLogicalW(string psz1, string psz2);

Michael Kaplan has some examples of how this function works here, and the changes that were made for Vista to make it work more intuitively. The plus side of this function is that it will have the same behaviour as the version of Windows it runs on, however this does mean that it differs between versions of Windows so you need to consider whether this is a problem for you.

So a complete implementation would be something like:

[SuppressUnmanagedCodeSecurity]
internal static class SafeNativeMethods
{
    [DllImport("shlwapi.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
    public static extern int StrCmpLogicalW(string psz1, string psz2);
}

public sealed class NaturalStringComparer : IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string a, string b)
    {
        return SafeNativeMethods.StrCmpLogicalW(a, b);
    }
}

public sealed class NaturalFileInfoNameComparer : IComparer<FileInfo>
{
    public int Compare(FileInfo a, FileInfo b)
    {
        return SafeNativeMethods.StrCmpLogicalW(a.Name, b.Name);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Great answer. Caveat: This won't work with Win2000, for those few folks still running things on that operating system. On the other hand, there's enough hints between Kaplan's blog and the MSDN documentation to create a similar function. –  Chris Charabaruk Oct 29 '08 at 22:30
1  
This is not portable, only works in Win32, but does not work in Linux / MacOS / Silverlight / Windows Phone / Metro –  linquize Jul 29 '12 at 9:36
8  
@linquize - He said .NET not Mono, so Linux/OSX isn't really a concern. Windows Phone/Metro didn't exist in 2008 when this answer was posted. And how often do you do file operations in Silverlight? So for the OP, and probably most other people, it was a suitable answer. In any case, you're free to provide a better answer; that's how this site works. –  Greg Beech Jul 30 '12 at 7:45
9  
@linquize - You expect me to periodically go back over all my answers for the last four years to ensure they reflect the most up to date information available...? As I said, this answer was perfectly reasonable four years ago, as can clearly be seen by the fact that the OP marked it as accepted. –  Greg Beech Jul 30 '12 at 12:15
2  
This does not mean that the original answer was wrong. I just add additional info with up-to-date info –  linquize Jul 30 '12 at 15:10

Just thought I'd add to this (with the most concise solution I could find):

    public static IEnumerable<T> OrderByAlphaNumeric<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, string> selector)
    {
        int max = source
            .SelectMany(i => Regex.Matches(selector(i), @"\d+").Cast<Match>().Select(m => (int?)m.Value.Length))
            .Max() ?? 0;

        return source.OrderBy(i => Regex.Replace(selector(i), @"\d+", m => m.Value.PadLeft(max, '0')));
    }

The above pads any numbers in the string to the max length of all numbers in all strings and uses the resulting string to sort.

The cast to (int?) is to allow for collections of strings without any numbers (.Max() on an empty enumerable throws an InvalidOperationException).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Not only is it the most concise it is the fastest I have seen. except for the accepted answer but I cannot use that one because of machine dependencies. It sorted over 4 million values in about 35 seconds. –  Gene S Oct 4 '12 at 20:58
    
This is both beautiful and impossible to read. I assume that the benefits of Linq will mean (at least) best average and best-case performance, so I think I'm going to go with it. Despite the lack of clarity. Thanks very much @Matthew Horsley –  Ian Grainger Jan 16 '14 at 11:29

Pure C# solution for linq orderby:

http://zootfroot.blogspot.com/2009/09/natural-sort-compare-with-linq-orderby.html

share|improve this answer
2  
That code is ultimately from codeproject.com/KB/recipes/NaturalComparer.aspx (which is not LINQ-oriented). –  mhenry1384 Aug 31 '10 at 21:19
1  
The blog post credits Justin Jones (codeproject.com/KB/string/NaturalSortComparer.aspx) for the IComparer, not Pascal Ganaye. –  James McCormack Sep 1 '10 at 9:59
    
This solution does the job for me. –  thd Dec 28 '10 at 18:50
1  
Minor note, this solution ignores spaces which is not the same as what windows does, and is not as good as Matthew Horsley's code below. So you might get 'string01' 'string 01' 'string 02' 'string02' for example (which looks ugly). If you remove the stripping of spaces, it orders the strings backwards i.e. 'string01' comes before 'string 01', which may or may not be acceptable. –  Michael Parker Mar 7 '14 at 17:43
    
This worked for addresses, ie "1 Smith Rd", "10 Smith Rd", "2 Smith Rd", etc - Sorted naturally. Yes! Nice one! –  ppumkin Aug 12 at 15:18

None of the existing implementations looked great so I wrote my own. The results are almost identical to the sorting used by modern versions of Windows Explorer (Windows 7/8). The only differences I've seen are 1) although Windows used to (e.g. XP) handle numbers of any length, it's now limited to 19 digits - mine is unlimited, 2) Windows gives inconsistent results with certain sets of Unicode digits - mine works fine (although it doesn't numerically compare digits from surrogate pairs; nor does Windows), and 3) mine can't distinguish different types of non-primary sort weights if they occur in different sections (e.g. "e-1é" vs "é1e-" - the sections before and after the number have diacritic and punctuation weight differences).

public static int CompareNatural(string strA, string strB) {
    return CompareNatural(strA, strB, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, CompareOptions.IgnoreCase);
}

public static int CompareNatural(string strA, string strB, CultureInfo culture, CompareOptions options) {
    CompareInfo cmp = culture.CompareInfo;
    int iA = 0;
    int iB = 0;
    int softResult = 0;
    int softResultWeight = 0;
    while (iA < strA.Length && iB < strB.Length) {
        bool isDigitA = Char.IsDigit(strA[iA]);
        bool isDigitB = Char.IsDigit(strB[iB]);
        if (isDigitA != isDigitB) {
            return cmp.Compare(strA, iA, strB, iB, options);
        }
        else if (!isDigitA && !isDigitB) {
            int jA = iA + 1;
            int jB = iB + 1;
            while (jA < strA.Length && !Char.IsDigit(strA[jA])) jA++;
            while (jB < strB.Length && !Char.IsDigit(strB[jB])) jB++;
            int cmpResult = cmp.Compare(strA, iA, jA - iA, strB, iB, jB - iB, options);
            if (cmpResult != 0) {
                // Certain strings may be considered different due to "soft" differences that are
                // ignored if more significant differences follow, e.g. a hyphen only affects the
                // comparison if no other differences follow
                string sectionA = strA.Substring(iA, jA - iA);
                string sectionB = strB.Substring(iB, jB - iB);
                if (cmp.Compare(sectionA + "1", sectionB + "2", options) ==
                    cmp.Compare(sectionA + "2", sectionB + "1", options))
                {
                    return cmp.Compare(strA, iA, strB, iB, options);
                }
                else if (softResultWeight < 1) {
                    softResult = cmpResult;
                    softResultWeight = 1;
                }
            }
            iA = jA;
            iB = jB;
        }
        else {
            char zeroA = (char)(strA[iA] - (int)Char.GetNumericValue(strA[iA]));
            char zeroB = (char)(strB[iB] - (int)Char.GetNumericValue(strB[iB]));
            int jA = iA;
            int jB = iB;
            while (strA[jA] == zeroA) jA++;
            while (strB[jB] == zeroB) jB++;
            int resultIfSameLength = 0;
            do {
                isDigitA = jA < strA.Length && Char.IsDigit(strA[jA]);
                isDigitB = jB < strB.Length && Char.IsDigit(strB[jB]);
                int numA = isDigitA ? (int)Char.GetNumericValue(strA[jA]) : 0;
                int numB = isDigitB ? (int)Char.GetNumericValue(strB[jB]) : 0;
                if (isDigitA && (char)(strA[jA] - numA) != zeroA) isDigitA = false;
                if (isDigitB && (char)(strB[jB] - numB) != zeroB) isDigitB = false;
                if (isDigitA && isDigitB) {
                    if (numA != numB && resultIfSameLength == 0) {
                        resultIfSameLength = numA < numB ? -1 : 1;
                    }
                    jA++;
                    jB++;
                }
            }
            while (isDigitA && isDigitB);
            if (isDigitA != isDigitB) {
                // One number has more digits than the other (ignoring leading zeros) - the longer
                // number must be larger
                return isDigitA ? 1 : -1;
            }
            else if (resultIfSameLength != 0) {
                // Both numbers are the same length (ignoring leading zeros) and at least one of
                // the digits differed - the first difference determines the result
                return resultIfSameLength;
            }
            int lA = jA - iA;
            int lB = jB - iB;
            if (lA != lB) {
                // Both numbers are equivalent but one has more leading zeros
                return lA > lB ? -1 : 1;
            }
            else if (zeroA != zeroB && softResultWeight < 2) {
                softResult = cmp.Compare(strA, iA, 1, strB, iB, 1, options);
                softResultWeight = 2;
            }
            iA = jA;
            iB = jB;
        }
    }
    if (iA < strA.Length || iB < strB.Length) {
        return iA < strA.Length ? 1 : -1;
    }
    else if (softResult != 0) {
        return softResult;
    }
    return 0;
}

The signature matches the Comparison<string> delegate:

string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(@"C:\");
Array.Sort(files, CompareNatural);

Here's a wrapper class for use as IComparer<string>:

public class CustomComparer<T> : IComparer<T> {
    private Comparison<T> _comparison;

    public CustomComparer(Comparison<T> comparison) {
        _comparison = comparison;
    }

    public int Compare(T x, T y) {
        return _comparison(x, y);
    }
}

Example:

string[] files = Directory.EnumerateFiles(@"C:\")
    .OrderBy(f => f, new CustomComparer<string>(CompareNatural))
    .ToArray();

Here's a good set of filenames I use for testing:

Func<string, string> expand = (s) => { int o; while ((o = s.IndexOf('\\')) != -1) { int p = o + 1;
    int z = 1; while (s[p] == '0') { z++; p++; } int c = Int32.Parse(s.Substring(p, z));
    s = s.Substring(0, o) + new string(s[o - 1], c) + s.Substring(p + z); } return s; };
string encodedFileNames =
    "KDEqLW4xMiotbjEzKjAwMDFcMDY2KjAwMlwwMTcqMDA5XDAxNyowMlwwMTcqMDlcMDE3KjEhKjEtISox" +
    "LWEqMS4yNT8xLjI1KjEuNT8xLjUqMSoxXDAxNyoxXDAxOCoxXDAxOSoxXDA2NioxXDA2NyoxYSoyXDAx" +
    "NyoyXDAxOCo5XDAxNyo5XDAxOCo5XDA2Nio9MSphMDAxdGVzdDAxKmEwMDF0ZXN0aW5nYTBcMzEqYTAw" +
    "Mj9hMDAyIGE/YTAwMiBhKmEwMDIqYTAwMmE/YTAwMmEqYTAxdGVzdGluZ2EwMDEqYTAxdnNmcyphMSph" +
    "MWEqYTF6KmEyKmIwMDAzcTYqYjAwM3E0KmIwM3E1KmMtZSpjZCpjZipmIDEqZipnP2cgMT9oLW4qaG8t" +
    "bipJKmljZS1jcmVhbT9pY2VjcmVhbT9pY2VjcmVhbS0/ajBcNDE/ajAwMWE/ajAxP2shKmsnKmstKmsx" +
    "KmthKmxpc3QqbTAwMDNhMDA1YSptMDAzYTAwMDVhKm0wMDNhMDA1Km0wMDNhMDA1YSpuMTIqbjEzKm8t" +
    "bjAxMypvLW4xMipvLW40P28tbjQhP28tbjR6P28tbjlhLWI1Km8tbjlhYjUqb24wMTMqb24xMipvbjQ/" +
    "b240IT9vbjR6P29uOWEtYjUqb245YWI1Km/CrW4wMTMqb8KtbjEyKnAwMCpwMDEqcDAxwr0hKnAwMcK9" +
    "KnAwMcK9YSpwMDHCvcK+KnAwMipwMMK9KnEtbjAxMypxLW4xMipxbjAxMypxbjEyKnItMDAhKnItMDAh" +
    "NSpyLTAwIe+8lSpyLTAwYSpyLe+8kFwxIS01KnIt77yQXDEhLe+8lSpyLe+8kFwxISpyLe+8kFwxITUq" +
    "ci3vvJBcMSHvvJUqci3vvJBcMWEqci3vvJBcMyE1KnIwMCEqcjAwLTUqcjAwLjUqcjAwNSpyMDBhKnIw" +
    "NSpyMDYqcjQqcjUqctmg2aYqctmkKnLZpSpy27Dbtipy27Qqctu1KnLfgN+GKnLfhCpy34UqcuClpuCl" +
    "rCpy4KWqKnLgpasqcuCnpuCnrCpy4KeqKnLgp6sqcuCppuCprCpy4KmqKnLgqasqcuCrpuCrrCpy4Kuq" +
    "KnLgq6sqcuCtpuCtrCpy4K2qKnLgrasqcuCvpuCvrCpy4K+qKnLgr6sqcuCxpuCxrCpy4LGqKnLgsasq" +
    "cuCzpuCzrCpy4LOqKnLgs6sqcuC1puC1rCpy4LWqKnLgtasqcuC5kOC5lipy4LmUKnLguZUqcuC7kOC7" +
    "lipy4LuUKnLgu5UqcuC8oOC8pipy4LykKnLgvKUqcuGBgOGBhipy4YGEKnLhgYUqcuGCkOGClipy4YKU" +
    "KnLhgpUqcuGfoOGfpipy4Z+kKnLhn6UqcuGgkOGglipy4aCUKnLhoJUqcuGlhuGljCpy4aWKKnLhpYsq" +
    "cuGnkOGnlipy4aeUKnLhp5UqcuGtkOGtlipy4a2UKnLhrZUqcuGusOGutipy4a60KnLhrrUqcuGxgOGx" +
    "hipy4bGEKnLhsYUqcuGxkOGxlipy4bGUKnLhsZUqcuqYoFwx6pilKnLqmKDqmKUqcuqYoOqYpipy6pik" +
    "KnLqmKUqcuqjkOqjlipy6qOUKnLqo5UqcuqkgOqkhipy6qSEKnLqpIUqcuqpkOqplipy6qmUKnLqqZUq" +
    "cvCQkqAqcvCQkqUqcvCdn5gqcvCdn50qcu+8kFwxISpy77yQXDEt77yVKnLvvJBcMS7vvJUqcu+8kFwx" +
    "YSpy77yQXDHqmKUqcu+8kFwx77yO77yVKnLvvJBcMe+8lSpy77yQ77yVKnLvvJDvvJYqcu+8lCpy77yV" +
    "KnNpKnPEsSp0ZXN02aIqdGVzdNmi2aAqdGVzdNmjKnVBZS0qdWFlKnViZS0qdUJlKnVjZS0xw6kqdWNl" +
    "McOpLSp1Y2Uxw6kqdWPDqS0xZSp1Y8OpMWUtKnVjw6kxZSp3ZWlhMSp3ZWlhMip3ZWlzczEqd2Vpc3My" +
    "KndlaXoxKndlaXoyKndlacOfMSp3ZWnDnzIqeSBhMyp5IGE0KnknYTMqeSdhNCp5K2EzKnkrYTQqeS1h" +
    "Myp5LWE0KnlhMyp5YTQqej96IDA1MD96IDIxP3ohMjE/ejIwP3oyMj96YTIxP3rCqTIxP1sxKl8xKsKt" +
    "bjEyKsKtbjEzKsSwKg==";
string[] fileNames = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(Convert.FromBase64String(encodedFileNames))
    .Replace("*", ".txt?").Split(new[] { "?" }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
    .Select(n => expand(n)).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
The digit sections need to be compared section-wise, i.e., 'abc12b' should be less than 'abc123'. –  Xichen Li Feb 18 '13 at 22:14
    
@XichenLi The code already does that. –  J.D. Feb 20 '13 at 6:15
    
You could try the following data: public string[] filenames = { "-abc12.txt", "abc12.txt", "1abc_2.txt", "a0000012.txt", "a0000012c.txt", "a000012.txt", "a000012b.txt", "a012.txt", "a0000102.txt", "abc1_2.txt", "abc12.txt", "abc12b.txt", "abc123.txt", "abccde.txt", "b0000.txt", "b00001.txt", "b0001.txt", "b001.txt", "c0000.txt", "c0000c.txt", "c00001.txt", "c000b.txt", "d0.20.2b.txt", "d0.1000c.txt", "d0.2000y.txt", "d0.20000.2b.txt", "e0000120000012", "e0000012000012"}; –  Xichen Li Feb 21 '13 at 1:59
1  
@XichenLi I've updated my code to work more like Windows 8. –  J.D. Feb 25 '13 at 1:22
1  
Has bug. Index Out Of Range –  linquize Mar 18 '13 at 6:23

You do need to be careful -- I vaguely recall reading that StrCmpLogicalW, or something like it, was not strictly transitive, and I have observed .NET's sort methods to sometimes get stuck in infinite loops if the comparison function breaks that rule.

A transitive comparison will always report that a < c if a < b and b < c. There exists a function that does a natural sort order comparison that does not always meet that criterion, but I can't recall whether it is StrCmpLogicalW or something else.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have any proof of this statement? After googling around, I can't find any indication that it is true. –  mhenry1384 Aug 31 '10 at 21:03
1  
I've experienced those infinite loops with StrCmpLogicalW. –  thd Dec 28 '10 at 18:48
3  
    
Visual Studio feedback item 236900 no longer exists, but here's a more up-to-date one that confirms the problem: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/774540/… It also gives a work-around: CultureInfo has a property CompareInfo, and the object it returns can supply you with SortKey objects. These, in turn, can be compared and guarantee transitivity. –  Jonathan Gilbert May 8 at 20:23

My solution:

void Main()
{
    new[] {"a4","a3","a2","a10","b5","b4","b400","1","C1d","c1d2"}.OrderBy(x => x, new NaturalStringComparer()).Dump();
}

public class NaturalStringComparer : IComparer<string>
{
    private static readonly Regex _re = new Regex(@"(?<=\D)(?=\d)|(?<=\d)(?=\D)", RegexOptions.Compiled);

    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        x = x.ToLower();
        y = y.ToLower();
        if(string.Compare(x, 0, y, 0, Math.Min(x.Length, y.Length)) == 0)
        {
            if(x.Length == y.Length) return 0;
            return x.Length < y.Length ? -1 : 1;
        }
        var a = _re.Split(x);
        var b = _re.Split(y);
        int i = 0;
        while(true)
        {
            int r = PartCompare(a[i], b[i]);
            if(r != 0) return r;
            ++i;
        }
    }

    private static int PartCompare(string x, string y)
    {
        int a, b;
        if(int.TryParse(x, out a) && int.TryParse(y, out b))
            return a.CompareTo(b);
        return x.CompareTo(y);
    }
}

Results:

1
a2
a3
a4
a10
b4
b5
b400
C1d
c1d2

Edit: Thinking abotut his some more, we can do this better yet. There's really no need to split the string at all. You can just compare it character by character from the start, and then if they differ and the character they differ on is a digit, then convert from that character forward into an integer (perhaps using a regex with \G\d+), and compare the ints.

Only problem I see is if you have strings like a01b and a1b, then the ints will compare the same... I suppose I'd just re-compare them (the integer portion) lexicographically then, and bail out before we even look at the b.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, works as expected. –  Natxo Oct 17 '12 at 14:12

Adding to Greg Beech's answer (because I've just been searching for that), if you want to use this from Linq you can use the OrderBy that takes an IComparer. E.g.:

var items = new List<MyItem>();

// fill items

var sorted = items.OrderBy(item => item.Name, new NaturalStringComparer());
share|improve this answer

Matthews Horsleys answer is the fastest method which doesn't change behaviour depending on which version of windows your program is running on. However, it can be even faster by creating the regex once, and using RegexOptions.Compiled. I also added the option of inserting a string comparer so you can ignore case if needed, and improved readability a bit.

    public static IEnumerable<T> OrderByNatural<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, string> selector, StringComparer stringComparer = null)
    {
        var regex = new Regex(@"\d+", RegexOptions.Compiled);

        int maxDigits = items
                      .SelectMany(i => regex.Matches(selector(i)).Cast<Match>().Select(digitChunk => (int?)digitChunk.Value.Length))
                      .Max() ?? 0;

        return items.OrderBy(i => regex.Replace(selector(i), match => match.Value.PadLeft(maxDigits, '0')), stringComparer ?? StringComparer.CurrentCulture);
    }

Use by

var sortedEmployees = employees.OrderByNatural(emp => emp.Name);

This takes 450ms to sort 100,000 strings compared to 300ms for the default .net string comparison - pretty fast!

share|improve this answer

Fix for the CompareNatural implementation of J.D.:

Ran on "Index out of range" exception too. Changed

while (strA[jA] == zeroA) jA++;
while (strB[jB] == zeroB) jB++;

to

while (jA < strA.Length && strA[jA] == zeroA) jA++;
while (jB < strB.Length && strB[jB] == zeroB) jB++;

Thanks to J.D.! Helped a lot on WinRT.

Hth,

Stefan

share|improve this answer

We had a need for a natural sort to deal with text with the following pattern:

"Test 1-1-1 something"
"Test 1-2-3 something"
...

For some reason when I first looked on SO, I didn't find this post and implemented our own. Compared to some of the solutions presented here, while similar in concept, it could have the benefit of maybe being simpler and easier to understand. However, while I did try to look at performance bottlenecks, It is still a much slower implementation than the default OrderBy().

Here is the extension method I implement:

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    // set up the regex parser once and for all
    private static readonly Regex Regex = new Regex(@"\d+|\D+", RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.Singleline);

    // stateless comparer can be built once
    private static readonly AggregateComparer Comparer = new AggregateComparer();

    public static IEnumerable<T> OrderByNatural<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, string> selector)
    {
        // first extract string from object using selector
        // then extract digit and non-digit groups
        Func<T, IEnumerable<IComparable>> splitter =
            s => Regex.Matches(selector(s))
                      .Cast<Match>()
                      .Select(m => Char.IsDigit(m.Value[0]) ? (IComparable) int.Parse(m.Value) : m.Value);
        return source.OrderBy(splitter, Comparer);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This comparer will compare two lists of objects against each other
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>Objects in each list are compare to their corresponding elements in the other
    /// list until a difference is found.</remarks>
    private class AggregateComparer : IComparer<IEnumerable<IComparable>>
    {
        public int Compare(IEnumerable<IComparable> x, IEnumerable<IComparable> y)
        {
            return
                x.Zip(y, (a, b) => new {a, b})              // walk both lists
                 .Select(pair => pair.a.CompareTo(pair.b))  // compare each object
                 .FirstOrDefault(result => result != 0);    // until a difference is found
        }
    }
}

The idea is to split the original strings into blocks of digits and non-digits ("\d+|\D+"). Since this is a potentially expensive task, it is done only once per entry. We then use a comparer of comparable objects (sorry, I can't find a more proper way to say it). It compares each block to its corresponding block in the other string.

I would like feedback on how this could be improved and what the major flaws are. Note that maintainability is important to us at this point and we are not currently using this in extremely large data sets.

share|improve this answer
1  
This crashes when it tries to compare strings that are structurally different - eg comparing "a-1" to "a-2" works fine, but comparing "a" to "1" is not, because "a".CompareTo(1) throws an exception. –  jimrandomh Oct 29 '13 at 18:22
    
@jimrandomh, you are correct. This approach was specific to our patterns. –  Eric Liprandi Nov 8 '13 at 16:25

Expanding on a couple of the previous answers and making use of extension methods, I came up with the following that doesn't have the caveats of potential multiple enumerable enumeration, or performance issues concerned with using multiple regex objects, or calling regex needlessly, that being said, it does use ToList(), which can negate the benefits in larger collections.

The selector supports generic typing to allow any delegate to be assigned, the elements in the source collection are mutated by the selector, then converted to strings with ToString().

    private static readonly Regex _NaturalOrderExpr = new Regex(@"\d+", RegexOptions.Compiled);

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> OrderByNatural<TSource, TKey>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector)
    {
        int max = 0;

        var selection = source.Select(
            o =>
            {
                var v = selector(o);
                var s = v != null ? v.ToString() : String.Empty;

                if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s))
                {
                    var mc = _NaturalOrderExpr.Matches(s);

                    if (mc.Count > 0)
                    {
                        max = Math.Max(max, mc.Cast<Match>().Max(m => m.Value.Length));
                    }
                }

                return new
                {
                    Key = o,
                    Value = s
                };
            }).ToList();

        return
            selection.OrderBy(
                o =>
                String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(o.Value) ? o.Value : _NaturalOrderExpr.Replace(o.Value, m => m.Value.PadLeft(max, '0')))
                     .Select(o => o.Key);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> OrderByDescendingNatural<TSource, TKey>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector)
    {
        int max = 0;

        var selection = source.Select(
            o =>
            {
                var v = selector(o);
                var s = v != null ? v.ToString() : String.Empty;

                if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s))
                {
                    var mc = _NaturalOrderExpr.Matches(s);

                    if (mc.Count > 0)
                    {
                        max = Math.Max(max, mc.Cast<Match>().Max(m => m.Value.Length));
                    }
                }

                return new
                {
                    Key = o,
                    Value = s
                };
            }).ToList();

        return
            selection.OrderByDescending(
                o =>
                String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(o.Value) ? o.Value : _NaturalOrderExpr.Replace(o.Value, m => m.Value.PadLeft(max, '0')))
                     .Select(o => o.Key);
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.