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In Ruby 2.1.2p95 I wanted to check if a class method was being called using the same class it was defined in or using a child class. That's to say, which of these is happening:

Parent.my_method

or

Child.my_method

I tried this:

def self.my_method
  if self == self.method(__method__).owner
    puts "called in Parent"
  end
end

But while self returns the name of the class, e.g. 'Parent', Method#owner returns something that looks like this:

#<Class:Parent>

So, um, what's that?

And is there a slick way of testing whether something's being called from the parent or the child?


Update for clarity: I'm only defining a class method in the parent. I'm not overriding anything. I'm merely calling the parent class method either directly (Parent.my_method) or via a child (Child.my_method) and I want to be able to tell the difference.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this will do what you say

class Parent
end

class Child < Parent
end

def Parent.my_method
  if singleton_class == method(__method__).owner
    puts "called in Parent"
  end
end

Parent.my_method
Child.my_method

my_method is defined in the singleton class of class Parent.

When called with Parent, it just works. If called with Child, it will be looked up through the Child's singleton class and up to the Parent's singleton class.

Because Parent's singleton class is the super class of Child's singleton class.

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Looks like method(method).owner is returning the singleton class. Didn't realise that. Brilliant! –  snowangel Jul 21 '14 at 9:42
    
Because Parent's singleton class is the super class of Child's singleton class. -> I thought I already understood everything but I didn't know this. I should take note of it. +1 –  konsolebox Jul 21 '14 at 11:14
    
@konsolebox You get much more experiences than me. I read it from metaprogramming ruby when learning ruby. –  Windor C Jul 21 '14 at 14:57
    
@snowangel yes, the my_method is defined in Parent.singleton_class while Method#owner returns the class or module that defines the method. –  Windor C Jul 21 '14 at 15:00
  • So, um, what's that?

    That is an inspection of the singleton class of class Parent. Class methods are defined as instance methods of the singleton class of the original class.

  • And is there slick way of testing whether something's being called from the parent or the child?

    Yes. A child class does not inherit class methods from its parent. So if a class method is callable without error, then it is defined on that class instance. If it raises an undefined error, then it is not defined on that class instance.

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'inspection of the singleton class of class Parent' sounds interesting. Will investigate. But I don't really understand the bit about class methods not being inherited. When I call Child.my_method and my_method is only defined in Parent, aren't I calling an inherited class method? –  snowangel Jul 21 '14 at 9:00
1  
Sorry, regrading the second part, I may have had wrong understanding. This link may help. –  sawa Jul 21 '14 at 9:07

I think this would explain everything.

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

class Parent
  def something
    klass = self.class
    if klass == Parent
      puts "Instance method called from an instance of Parent class."
    else
      puts "Instance method called from an instance of #{klass} class."
    end
  end

  def self.something
    puts "Class method of #{self} called."
  end
end

class Child < Parent
  def self.something
    puts "Class method of #{self} called."
  end
end

Parent.something
Child.something
Parent.new.something
Child.new.something

Output:

Class method of Parent called.
Class method of Child called.
Instance method called from Parent class.
Instance method called from Child class.

So about your question:

And is there a slick way of testing whether something's being called from the parent or the child?

For a class method, it's not applicable since the method can only be called from the very instance (Class instance) of the class itself.

For an instance method, yes by comparing it with the instance's class that you declared.

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Thanks, but that doesn't seem to be right. 'self.class' returns me: 'Class' and 'self.method(method).owner' returns me either '#<Class:Parent>' or '#<Class:Child>' –  snowangel Jul 21 '14 at 8:52
    
@snowangel Yes I noticed. I'm still thinking a better answer to it. Actually, Uri Agassi may have the right answer to it already. –  konsolebox Jul 21 '14 at 8:52

You should never ever ever have to check what self is. That's just wrong. self knows about itself, it shouldn't have to check. Do you get up in the morning and look in the mirror to check who you are?

That's what polymorphism is for:

class Parent; end
class Child < Parent; end

def Parent.my_method; 'Called in Parent' end
def Child.my_method;  'Called in Child'  end

Simple as that.

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That sort of sounds as though you don't approve of reflection in Ruby. If we add a third class class GrandChild < Child; end then we have to type out a third variant of my_method. Wouldn't you eventually get tempted to write def Parent.my_method; "Called in #{self}" end and just let inheritance and a bit of reflection do all the work? And just to give this more of a real-world feel, you could imagine it was an error message from an inherited class method; wouldn't it be nice to automatically tell the developer the correct name of the class the problem occurred in? –  RobJ Jul 25 '14 at 16:43

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