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I need to implement a search mechanism for a list of words and give the result whether the word is found are not in a text provided.

I implemented this using boost library. And it is as follows,

int main(int argc, char**argv)
{
   int count = argc - 2;
   std::string text = argv[1];
   for(int i = 2; i < argc; i++)
   {
      boost::regex re(argv[i], boost::regex::icase);
      if(boost::regex_search(text, re))
      {
          std::cout<<re<<" Found in "<<text<<std::endl;
          count--;
      }
      else std::cout<<re<<" Not Found in " <<text<<std::endl;
   }
   if(count == 0)
   {
      std::cout <<"ALL WORDS ARE FOUND"<<std::endl;
   }
   else std::cout << "SOME WORDS ARE NOT FOUND"<<std::endl;
}

It is working fine for the command line arguements.

Now, what I need is I should provide an array of words directly to the boost search method (if any is available) as a parameter which should return whether all words are found are not.

I've Googled for this but of no use.

share|improve this question
    
Why are you using regex? It seems to me like string::find() would work fine (en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/find). – nasser-sh Jul 21 '14 at 11:14
1  
? @Nasser regular expressions have different semantics – sehe Jul 21 '14 at 11:14
    
@sehe I know. I was commenting on OP's implementation, but I missed the boost::regex::icase part. What I was suggesting is that find() would give the same result as the implementation. Anyway, my bad. – nasser-sh Jul 21 '14 at 11:17
    
@Nasser, from huge program which uses boost methods, I copied only a part which actually uses regex_search. – Shiva Kumar Ganthi Jul 21 '14 at 11:25
    
@Nasser you try that when arg[3] contains "Ha.*!". And text contains "Handsome Hallelujah Hazards!". icase is a mere detail here. Regex has vastly different semantics than find (which is probably why there are entire libraries implement regex search) – sehe Jul 21 '14 at 11:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Either just use an array:

 std::vector<std::string> arr { "many", "words", "in", "array" };
 int count = arr.size();

 std::string text = argv[1];
 for(std::string const& word : arr)
 {
    boost::regex re(text, boost::regex::icase);
    if(boost::regex_search(text, re))
    {
        std::cout<<re<<" Found in "<<text<<std::endl;
        count--;
    }
    else std::cout<<re<<" Not Found in " <<text<<std::endl;
 }

You could make a regular expression containing all the words you are looking for (this would (vastly) reduce runtime complexity, but makes it harder to count the presence of individual words).

share|improve this answer
    
Since you are using initializer lists, I presume that you are working with C++11, in which case I would suggest that you add some information about std::regex to OP – nasser-sh Jul 21 '14 at 11:21
    
@sehe, Thanks for your answer. But, I need a boost library function which directly takes arr as a parameter and returns me the output as FOUND or Not Found. – Shiva Kumar Ganthi Jul 21 '14 at 11:22
3  
@Nasser std::regex is still widely unimplemented (at least GCC<4.9). I've no interest in suggesting less-supported, less featured (standard) libraries, when the OP is simply using Boost. – sehe Jul 21 '14 at 11:30
2  
@ShivaKumarGanthi I need a function that I can call with arbitrary parameters and returns Unicorns. (Hint: there is no silver bullet; boost is a highly generic library and contains building blocks. You can be almost certain that Boost Regex functions do no take arrays as arguments anyways, so I think that's end of story then). – sehe Jul 21 '14 at 11:32
    
@sehe If there is no function which takes an array as an arbitrary paramater then it is okay! – Shiva Kumar Ganthi Jul 21 '14 at 11:37

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