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I am working on BeagleBone Black (running Debian Linux) and I am trying to send some datagrams to broadcast via UDP using Qt 5.3.

Here is my code:

#include <QCoreApplication>
#include <QUdpSocket>
#include <QDebug>

#include <sys/socket.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QCoreApplication a(argc, argv);
    QUdpSocket socket;

    socket.bind(QHostAddress::AnyIPv4, 1111);

    int opt=1;
    setsockopt(socket.socketDescriptor(), SOL_SOCKET, SO_BROADCAST, &opt, sizeof(int));

    QByteArray d = QString("Hello, world!").toLatin1();
    int r = socket.writeDatagram(d, QHostAddress::Broadcast, 1111);

    qDebug() << r;
    qDebug() << socket.error();
    qDebug() << socket.errorString();

    return a.exec();
}

Unluckily it does not work and the output of the program is:

-1

QAbstractSocket::NetworkError

"Unable to send a message"

So the writeDatagram primitive fails. The same exact code works perfectly fine when compiled for my desktop PC... So I am assuming that the code is good and probably there is something specifically related to BBB.

I also tried to send the datagram to a specific IP address (instead of broadcast) but it does not change: BBB seems to be not able to send UDP packets at all...

Any ideas about that? Is there something to be configured on BBB for letting this work?

* UPDATE *

I slightly modified the code for explicitly enabling SO_BROADCAST on that socket and to bind the socket to any IPv4 interface (just to test) but it does not work anyway...

Looking at process strace (you can see it here) it seems that the linux kernel fails to recognize 255.255.255.255 as the broadcast address and tells that the network is unreacheable...

Here is my network configuration... it seems good to me, but correct me it not!

share|improve this question
    
have you crosscompiled for bbb? –  Velthune Jul 21 at 13:57
    
@Velthune: yes, sure... –  Morix Dev Jul 21 at 13:59
    
uhm ok, of course, and have you same qt version both in pc and in bbb? –  Velthune Jul 21 at 14:13
1  
@MorixDev The ifconfig output gives a Bcast: address for the interface in question. Use it. It's not 255.255.255.255. –  Kuba Ober Jul 21 at 15:15
1  
depend where do you read that number. Read his: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv4_subnetting_reference and this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcast_address . "A special definition exists for the IP broadcast address 255.255.255.255. It is the broadcast address of the zero network or 0.0.0.0, which in Internet Protocol standards stands for this network, i.e. the local network. Transmission to this address is limited by definition, in that it is never forwarded by the routers connecting the local network to other networks." –  Velthune Jul 22 at 6:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can reproduce this issue on RHEL 6 running 2.6.32-431.20.3.el6.x86_64. Even though a bind to 0.0.0.0 succeeds, the subsequent writeDatagram fails. Things work perfectly well when you bind to a particular interface.

As an aside, your network interface is not properly configured, even though I can't see any difference in the behavior of the program due to this alone. The broadcast address on your eth0 should be 192.168.79.255, not 255.255.255.255.

#include <QCoreApplication>
#include <QUdpSocket>
#include <QNetworkInterface>
#include <QDebug>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   QCoreApplication a(argc, argv);
   QUdpSocket socket;

   QList<QHostAddress> ifAddrs = QNetworkInterface::allAddresses();
   qDebug() << ifAddrs;

   QHostAddress ifAddr(QHostAddress::Any);
   foreach (QHostAddress ia, ifAddrs) {
      if (ia.protocol() == QAbstractSocket::IPv6Protocol) continue;
      if (ia.isInSubnet(QHostAddress::LocalHost, 8)) continue;
      ifAddr = ia;
      break;
   }
   if (false) ifAddr = QHostAddress::Any; // *** Change to if (true) to make the write fail.
   qDebug() << ifAddr;

   if (!socket.bind(ifAddr, 1111)) {
      qDebug() << "bind failed" << socket.error();
   }

   QByteArray d = QString("Hello, world!").toLatin1();
   int r = socket.writeDatagram(d, QHostAddress::Broadcast, 1111);

   qDebug() << r;
   if (r < 0) {
      qDebug() << socket.error();
      qDebug() << socket.errorString();
   }

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you're right about the improper configuration of my network device... it was one of my attempts to make things work... normally the broadcast address on eth0 is 192.168.79.255, you're right... anyway: you are saying me that in linux I cannot send an UDP datagram to 255.255.255.255 as I normally do in Windows? This could be a huge limitation... If using Windows I send a datagram to 255.255.255.255 then it is received by all the devices in my local network segment... in Linux I can only reach devices having IP 192.168.79.x (in my case). Am I wrong? –  Morix Dev Jul 22 at 12:00
    
@MorixDev You're certainly sending the datagram to 255.255.255.255 (note the address passed to writeDatagram). You're just not sending it "out anywhere", it has to go out through a particular interface you bind to. Since it's trivial to enumerate all interfaces in Qt, it's equally trivial to send it out all interfaces if you explicitly wish to do so. Are you really intending to send it out via the loopback interface, for example? I'm also not quite certain whether Windows really sends it out of all interfaces, or chooses the one with default routing. You'd need to test it first. –  Kuba Ober Jul 22 at 12:43
    
@MorixDev In any case, the expectation that a broadcast to 255.255.255.255 will reach everything on the local network segment has caveats. Sure it may reach everything, but there are zero guarantees that a reply unicast packet will reach you. If you were sending to the interface's broadcast address, you can at least depend on the replies getting back to you if things work OK. Say I have a 10.0.0.1 node on the same segment, and no routing set up between 192.168/16 and 10/8. The 10.0.0.1 host's UDP packet sent to a host on 192.168/16 won't go anywhere, because it has to be routed there. –  Kuba Ober Jul 22 at 12:49
    
@MorixDev Concrete scenario: 1. Node A is attached to the network. DHCP server assigns 192.168.79.55 to it. 2. DHCP server goes down. 2. Node B is attached. Sans DHCP, it self-assigns 169.254.8.56. 3. Node A broadcasts to 255.255.255.255. 4. Node B receives the broadcast. 5. Node B sends a unicast reply to 192.168.79.55. 6. There's no 6. The reply won't go out of the B's interface, and won't reach node A. There are certainly ways to make node B act as "desired", but such desire fundamentally breaks the standard-mandated behavior of node B, so it wouldn't be clever at all. –  Kuba Ober Jul 22 at 12:52
    
@MorixDev You have to understand that 255.255.255.255 is an alias for local network broadcast address. So sending to this address gives you no more functionality than sending to the interface's broadcast address. You are expecting something that simply isn't there. Whether Windows gives you an error status back or not doesn't change how things actually work. –  Kuba Ober Jul 22 at 12:56

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