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I saw this code:

[HttpGet]  
public async Task OperationAsync()  
{   
    await Task.Delay(2000);  
}

...in tip #7 here, and thought I would try it out. I changed this code:

[HttpGet]
[Route("api/Deliveries/Count")]
public int GetCountOfDeliveryRecords()
{
    return NRBQService.GetNRBQEntity(); 
}

...to this:

// [HttpGet] unnecessary when method name begins with "Get"
[Route("api/Deliveries/Count")] 
public async Task<int> GetCountOfDeliveryRecords()
{
    return await Task.NRBQService.GetNRBQEntity();
}

...but get, "'System.Threading.Tasks.Task' does not contain a definition for NRBQService'"

So what should I do to get it compile/work?

share|improve this question
1  
Delay is a static method on the Task class. NRBQService is not. What you're probably looking for is an equivalent of NRBQService.GetNRBQEntityAsync. – Stephen Cleary Jul 21 '14 at 17:22
2  
return await Task.Run(()=>NRBQService.GetNRBQEntity()); But how do you think it will help you? – EZI Jul 21 '14 at 17:22
3  
@EZI: Not recommended on ASP.NET. – Stephen Cleary Jul 21 '14 at 17:23
1  
Are you having performance issues and trying to fix them? Because this is very very unlikely to fix anything. That tip in general should come with a whole ton of caveats. Async is good, but its not doing anything magical - it just potentially frees up threads. This is usually useful when using libraries designed for async - typically requests to other web services and maybe heavy duty file processing. – George Mauer Jul 21 '14 at 17:30
1  
As a matter of fact, that entire list is a bit naive. Every single item on there should come with a boatload of caveats, enough that each can be an article in itself. The first thing that any optimization job needs is profiling to figure out what exactly is causing the issue. Then work at unblocking that. Generic "tips and tricks" are likely to result in non-meaningful micro-optimizations. – George Mauer Jul 21 '14 at 17:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can only await a Task or Task<T> (also other awaitables, but its unlikely you need to use one). Task.Delay is an asynchronous method that returns a Task. That allows you to write:

await Task.Delay(2000);

NRBQService.GetNRBQEntity is a method that returns an int, and so can't be awaited. You would need to create an asynchronous method that returns Task<int> like this:

public async Task<int> NRBQService.GetNRBQEntityAsync()
{
    // ...
}

And you could use it like that:

[Route("api/Deliveries/Count")] 
public async Task<int> GetCountOfDeliveryRecords()
{
    return await NRBQService.GetNRBQEntity();
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Interesting trivia - you can actually await anything that has a GetAwaiter method...and extension methods count! So it technically would be possible for the OP to await an int, just pointless. – George Mauer Jul 21 '14 at 17:26
1  
@GeorgeMauer true. That's why whenever i say "you can only await a task" I feel the need to add 2 paragraphs explaining why that's not true although you should act as though it is. – i3arnon Jul 21 '14 at 17:29

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