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Displaying "Type here to ..." until the user enters text into a TextBox is a well-known usability feature nowadays. How would one implement this feature in C#?

My idea is to override OnTextChanged, but the logic to handle the changes of text from and to "Type here" is a bit tricky...

Displaying "Type here" on initialization and removing it on first input is easy, but I want to display the message every time the entered text becomes empty.

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is this ASP.NET or windows forms? –  M4N Mar 21 '10 at 12:54
    
What technology are you interested in? is it ASP.NET, winforms or WPF, and maybe silverlight? Any way it's called "Watermark textbox" and you can find lots on each of the technologies. –  Shimmy Mar 21 '10 at 12:57
    
WinForms. -- Ah, didn't know that term. Thanks! –  mafu Mar 21 '10 at 13:06
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9 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What you're looking for is a texbox with "watermark"

There's a sample implementation for C# here.

Hope it helps

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Based on @Pooven's answer (thank you!), I created this class. Works for me.

/// <summary>
/// A textbox that supports a watermak hint.
/// </summary>
public class WatermarkTextBox : TextBox
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The text that will be presented as the watermak hint
    /// </summary>
    private string _watermarkText = "Type here";
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or Sets the text that will be presented as the watermak hint
    /// </summary>
    public string WatermarkText
    {
        get { return _watermarkText; }
        set { _watermarkText = value; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Whether watermark effect is enabled or not
    /// </summary>
    private bool _watermarkActive = true;
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or Sets whether watermark effect is enabled or not
    /// </summary>
    public bool WatermarkActive
    {
        get { return _watermarkActive; }
        set { _watermarkActive = value; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Create a new TextBox that supports watermak hint
    /// </summary>
    public WatermarkTextBox()
    {
        this._watermarkActive = true;
        this.Text = _watermarkText;
        this.ForeColor = Color.Gray;

        GotFocus += (source, e) =>
        {
            RemoveWatermak();
        };

        LostFocus += (source, e) =>
        {
            ApplyWatermark();
        };

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Remove watermark from the textbox
    /// </summary>
    public void RemoveWatermak()
    {
        if (this._watermarkActive)
        {
            this._watermarkActive = false;
            this.Text = "";
            this.ForeColor = Color.Black;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Applywatermak immediately
    /// </summary>
    public void ApplyWatermark()
    {
        if (!this._watermarkActive && string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.Text)
            || ForeColor == Color.Gray ) 
        {
            this._watermarkActive = true;
            this.Text = _watermarkText;
            this.ForeColor = Color.Gray;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Apply watermak to the textbox. 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="newText">Text to apply</param>
    public void ApplyWatermark(string newText)
    {
        WatermarkText = newText;
        ApplyWatermark();
    }

}
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Something that has worked for me:

this.waterMarkActive = true;
this.textBox.ForeColor = Color.Gray;
this.textBox.Text = "Type here";

this.textBox.GotFocus += (source, e) =>
  {
    if (this.waterMarkActive)
    {
      this.waterMarkActive = false;
      this.textBox.Text = "";
      this.textBox.ForeColor = Color.Black;
    }
  };

this.textBox.LostFocus += (source, e) =>
  {
    if (!this.waterMarkActive && string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.textBox.Text))
    {
      this.waterMarkActive = true;
      this.textBox.Text = "Type here";
      this.textBox.ForeColor = Color.Gray;
    }
  };

Where bool waterMarkActive is a class member variable and textBox is the TextBox. This probably should be encapsulated though :) There might be some issues with this approach, but I'm not currently aware of any.

I recently discovered that Windows support water marks in text boxes; they are called cue banners (see here). It's very easy to implement:

// Within your class or scoped in a more appropriate location:
[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern IntPtr SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, int Msg, int wParam, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string lParam);

// In your constructor or somewhere more suitable:
SendMessage(textBox.Handle, 0x1501, 1, "Please type here.");

Where textBox is an instance of TextBox, 0x1501 is the code for the windows message EM_SETCUEBANNER, the wParam may either be TRUE (non-zero) or FALSE (zero), and lParam is the water mark you'd like to display. wParam indicates when the cue banner should be displayed; if set to TRUE then the cue banner will be displayed even when the control has focus.

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If this is ASP.NET (as opposed to winforms), you could do this:

If you are using jQuery, add this to your document ready (or however you initialize your page):

var $textbox = $("textbox selector"); // assumes you select a single text box
if ($textbox.val() == "") {
   $textbox.val("Type here to...");
   $textbox.one('focus', function() {
     $(this).attr('value', '');
   });
}

You'll need to do some small refactoring if you are selecting more than one text box (put the if statement inside of an each on the element).

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I'm just starting to learn C# this semester so I'm not an expert, but this worked for me: (This is using windows forms)

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    textBox1.SelectionStart = 0;  //This keeps the text
    textBox1.SelectionLength = 0; //from being highlighted
    textBox1.ForeColor = Color.Gray;
}

private void textBox_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
    Cursor.Current = Cursors.IBeam; //Without this the mouse pointer shows busy
}

private void textBox1_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (textBox1.Text.Equals("Type here...") == true)
    {
        textBox1.Text = "";
        textBox1.ForeColor = Color.Black;
    }
}

private void textBox1_KeyUp(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (textBox1.Text.Equals(null) == true || textBox1.Text.Equals("") == true)
    {
        textBox1.Text = "Type here...";
        textBox1.ForeColor = Color.Gray;
    }
}
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You can draw string "Type here" to the textbox background until it empty

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Interesting idea, I'll try –  mafu Mar 21 '10 at 12:53
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Handle the lost focus event and if the property Text is empty, fill it with your default string.

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If this is for ASP.NET then you can try TextBoxWatermark.

If this is for Windows Forms, this is already answered here in SO.

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Why using OnTextChanged? I would suggest to remove the text "Type here" when the TextBox gets focus. When the control loses focus and no text is entered, you can display the text again.

Same result and no need for tricky logic.

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